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I read an article that said latex tube roll 10% faster than common butyl tubes cause its lighter. Its that true and is that really that significant? Does it easily punctured?

If its true, any good brand?
 

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Sounds like a marketing gimmick to sell more tubes. I did get better performance and a smoother ride when I went from 23 to 25 tires and went with a name brand, Continental. As for the puncture resistance, Mr. Tuffy Tire Liners are excellent to help prevent flats.
 

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I read an article that said latex tube roll 10% faster than common butyl tubes cause its lighter. Its that true and is that really that significant? Does it easily punctured?

If its true, any good brand?
The first thing to mention is what article you read, because their methods for determining how well tubes roll could be flawed. Secondly, if they could definitively say that latex tubes rolled 10% faster than butyl tubes, it's a misleading statement. That doesn't mean to say you'll immediately go from averaging 20mph to 22mph with the same effort. Having 10% less rolling resistance does not mean you can take whatever speed you average and multiply by 1.1.
 

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The first thing to mention is what article you read, because their methods for determining how well tubes roll could be flawed. Secondly, if they could definitively say that latex tubes rolled 10% faster than butyl tubes, it's a misleading statement. That doesn't mean to say you'll immediately go from averaging 20mph to 22mph with the same effort. Having 10% less rolling resistance does not mean you can take whatever speed you average and multiply by 1.1.
funny, that's exactly the same number that popped into my head when i read the OP's question. agreed, no chance that latex tubes alone will get you 10% more speed.
 

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The debate on this goes back decades. Some swear that latex tubes make for a better ride and less rolling resistance, others swear that the differences are imagined by the proponents.

The one thing that is certain is that latex tubes lose air faster and have to be pumped up more often. They're usually more expensive, too. They may be less reistant to some kinds of punctures, but more resistant to other kinds. That, too, is unclear.
 

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I use standard Kenda butyl tubes (48mm) that are $4.79 each at Bike Tires Direct and weigh 98g. The lightest tube I found on that site was the Continental Race Supersonic which is 50g and actually happens to be butyl yet costs $16.79.. The difference for a set is 96g, or 3.39 oz. That miniscule difference for an extra $24/pair doesn't make sense to me.
 

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I train right, watch my diet, ride a lot, and I can't see a 10% increase from all of that. If latex tubes can make me roll 10% faster, that means I can eat junk food, cut my training in half, and still achieve the same result. Sounds like a win-win situation, I best order me some latex tubes today!
 

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I read an article that said latex tube roll 10% faster than common butyl tubes cause its lighter. Its that true and is that really that significant? Does it easily punctured?

If its true, any good brand?
They do not ride 10% better, closer to 1%. For example in a tire test done by Al Morrison he tested a Velo Flex Pave clincher tire with a butyl tube and a latex tube, the wattage savings was just under 3 watts; a Schwalbe Ultremo was just under 1 watt; a Michelin Pro 2 was just under 1 watt; a Vittoria Open Corsa EVO was just under 2 1/2 watts.

If the average rider puts out 210 watts then as you see the wattage savings is about 1%, sometimes a bit less sometimes a bit more. However 1% gain over a 100 mile ride could mean the difference between winning or losing if you're in 2nd place by fractions riding butyl. In racing every legal advantage is important, and you can bet other racers will be using latex.

Personally unless you're racing latex tubes are useless, you will never feel 1 to 2 watts of savings. I've used them on and off for the last 40 years and found no advantage other then a slightly more comfortable ride which some people find that as advantageous. But by the time you spend $15 or more for a tube, and the frailness of latex, you wipe out any advantage. I don't consider latex losing about 25% to 33% of it's air over 24 hours as a disadvantage unless you will be doing a long 12 hour or 24 hour race because you should be checking your air pressure in butyl tubed tires before every ride anyways.

Edit; perhaps if you were using cheap very heavy thorn resistant tubes vs light latex tubes then maybe you would save 10%.
 

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Whenever someone claims a 1 or 2 watts benefit my BS meter pegs. The margin of error is usually at least that large.
 

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Whenever someone claims a 1 or 2 watts benefit my BS meter pegs. The margin of error is usually at least that large.
Roller Data click on whatever year of study you want, latex still only saves 1 to 2 watts. This was very scientifically done howbeit the only way it can be done and get consistent results, so put your BS meter away.
 

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I can't say latex tubes makes me faster but I can definitely attest that there is a stretch of chip seal I ride on where it is noticeably smoother with the latex tubes.

My experience is with Bontrager race x lite butyl vs bontrager latex. I lose about 1-3 psi overnight with the butyl. About 15 psi with latex.
 

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I can't say latex tubes makes me faster but I can definitely attest that there is a stretch of chip seal I ride on where it is noticeably smoother with the latex tubes.

My experience is with Bontrager race x lite butyl vs bontrager latex. I lose about 1-3 psi overnight with the butyl. About 15 psi with latex.
i'm happy with latex tubes. don't know if it's made me faster, not sure i really care. it is more comfortable though, noticeably if not dramatically.
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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Roller Data click on whatever year of study you want, latex still only saves 1 to 2 watts. This was very scientifically done howbeit the only way it can be done and get consistent results, so put your BS meter away.
I'm not going to try to preach to the converted, and I realize there are religions of energy savings in triathlon, but... those tables have been around for a long time and still only show a value for something you'll never see on an actual road. Yes it's scientific but there are numerous items the tests don't consider that can easily overshadow the tiny, miniscule Crr gains... wind resistance, material reaction to a change in temperature, debris layer effects, material flex due to changing torque... the list goes on and on. One thing I have learned, when people start talking about how their new revolutionary bike this or that is winning them races... they're a lying sack of poop and probably doing you know what. There are numerous car tires that claim gains for Crr and I guarantee you'll never see a difference for the same sized tire in terms of mpg because it is such a tiny, tiny fraction of the overall energy required to move the vehicle. A bicycle is analogous.
 

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What data do you have that shows they don't?
I'd list Eddy Merckx's 1972 hour record as strong evidence that any tire material and other similar improvement gains since this era are generally negligible in practice.
 
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