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Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in a pretty hilly area, so if I take out the fixie (which I do just about every day) I'm going to be going uphill. Not mountains, not huge hills, but hilly nonetheless. So of course when I'm going uphill i'm just mashing away. But now i've noticed that my comfortable spin on my roadie has gone from 95-100 to probably 87-92. When I say comfortable spin, I mean cadence/speed vs. effort. Is there something else going on or are my legs just adjusting to the mashing?
 

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The fixte is turning you into Jan Ullrich.

A fixte gives you a broader power band, a gearie trains you to ride at your optimal cadence but slowly over time makes you weaker unless you force yourself to go out and train in harder gears.

Congratulations, you are getting stronger.
 

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Agree with MB 1 -your'e gaining leg strength. With all the great advice out there to spin as fast and as long as you can, it helps to tell yourself every so often that pushing down hard on the pedal remains the other vital part of the power equation. If you can't push a big gear, you're not going to "gain ground" as they used to say.

Re about your "something else going on:" Greg Lemond had an interesting take on that. He didn't think the old-school regimen of fixed-gear in spring was helpful at all. His (probably more his coaches Guimard and/or Koechli) reasoning was that the fixed gear "does a lot of the work of creating the round stroke for you . . . and it becomes difficult to take the round stroke you learned on a fixed gear and apply it to a normal road bicycle."
 

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wim said:
Agree with MB 1 -your'e gaining leg strength. With all the great advice out there to spin as fast and as long as you can, it helps to tell yourself every so often that pushing down hard on the pedal remains the other vital part of the power equation. If you can't push a big gear, you're not going to "gain ground" as they used to say.

Re about your "something else going on:" Greg Lemond had an interesting take on that. He didn't think the old-school regimen of fixed-gear in spring was helpful at all. His (probably more his coaches Guimard and/or Koechli) reasoning was that the fixed gear "does a lot of the work of creating the round stroke for you . . . and it becomes difficult to take the round stroke you learned on a fixed gear and apply it to a normal road bicycle."

I feel if riding down hills on a fixed gear doesn't help your pedal stroke, nothing will help your pedal stroke.
 
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