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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I appreciate that one's budget is directly correlated to the content of one's wallet. For someone who has been a casual rider, and (after a few bike-a-thons) is looking to buy his first road bike, am I crazy to spend $4k? I am looking at a Serotta 2009 CDA. Will I likely after 6 mos regret not having spent half the amount because I didn't know what I didn't know? Am I on the righteous path or about to learn the hard way?
 

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Not really enough info to help you with that choice. How much do you ride, miles, frequency? What are you riding now? What type of roads, hilly? What makes you like this bike? Does the bike fit like a dream? These are the kind of questions to ask yourself.
If you have 4K to spend take a look around and ride lots of bikes before setting your sights on just this one. If you come back to it then it was ment to be but at least you will be more sure in your decision.

Ekh.
 

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*sigh* The body of this thread is incredibly disappointing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I ride a Trek Hybrid and have rented road bikes for long halls. I am just getting into the sport. I actually haven't been on the CDA. Test rode the Fierte and really liked the ride (I had a Fuji road bike in the early 90's for weekend riding which I loved). The LBS has a stock-custom CDA frame in my size that apparently is a really good value ($500k more than the Fierte) and much more pleasing on the eye (not to mention that the CDA has many more +'s). Again, I am new to the Road Bike world so your counsel is much appreciated. In regard to getting on as many road Bikes as I can to demo, any way of doing this that supports remembering one bike's ride to another one from weeks prior?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
sorry to disappoint -- apparently i was misinformed that the Forums were designed to "help" all users vs. entertain -- give a new guy a break
 

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bondbike said:
I appreciate that one's budget is directly correlated to the content of one's wallet. For someone who has been a casual rider, and (after a few bike-a-thons) is looking to buy his first road bike, am I crazy to spend $4k? I am looking at a Serotta 2009 CDA. Will I likely after 6 mos regret not having spent half the amount because I didn't know what I didn't know? Am I on the righteous path or about to learn the hard way?
Grow into it. IMO, you need some miles in your legs and butt before you can be an informed participant in the sort of fitting and custom build that makes a bike like that worthwhile. If bought spec'd for someone else or off the rack, it's not a $4K bike.
 

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Yes,
You have to work your way into it slowly to truly know what you are getting into.
 

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buy a good $1000-$1500 bike and save your money. You really will need to prove to yourself that you will stick with it. It's nice to spend the money and look at it but if it becomes another thing that collects dust.....If you buy a bike like that put the miles on it and make sure that you use it.
 

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Are you a dentist?

Just wondering.

Serottas are big with dentists.
 

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I have to go with the crowd here. I was going to say I don't think anybody needs a $4000 bike, but replacing either of my road bikes would probably cost $3000+, so I have no high ground to stand on (I only paid about half that for them, but times change...).
Really, though, if you're newish to the sport, your goals and ideas may be different in six months or a year than they are today. A $4000 bike is usually better than a $1500 one, but it isn't twice as good. I'd say buy something in the $1500 range, and when you have 5000 miles on it, figure out if you need a new one. You may not--I bought my Atlantis to tide me over until I could afford a Rivendell custom, and it's so close to perfect I've stuck with it for five years. And if you do decide to get something else, you'll have a spare bike/rain bike/beater right there.
 

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Dude if you have the coin and arent starving your kids or dogs to buy it then hell man, step up and buy it. If I won powerball I wouldnt be asking a bunch of internet clowns whether I should buy my first Ferrari.
 

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Sure, go for it. From here it looks like a 58cm will fit you just fine. :)







OK, as others have said, the 1000-1500 will buy you a pretty nice bike. That's what I did last year and it's still the engine that's the weakest link.
 

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I say look around and buy what you want, otherwise in 6 months you will want another bike. I bought a nice road bike for my first one, an 08 Synapse 3SL. It's not a $4,000 bike but I liked it and so far I have been very happy with it. I just did an MS150 prep ride Sunday and I am glad I purchased a higher end bike than I first looked at. It's very comfortable and perfect for the longer rides. I did get a great deal as it was back in October and got the bike at a great price. If I was buying a bike today I would ride a couple of others also just to compare them so I suggest doing the same, make sure you get the right bike which might not necessarily be the most expensive. Good luck, I have really enjoyed my first road bike.
 

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If you can afford it, it fits you well and fells good, sure buy it. Ride some others first of different materials, manufacturers, price levels, etc.

When I returned to road riding a few years ago, I test rode a Serotta CSi, although it was way above my price range. Something about the bike sung to me. I only rode it for a couple miles, but it was perfect and has been my benchmark ever since. I would love to pick up a Legend one day. I am now on my third bike chasing that feel.

$4,000 is a lot to spend for a first bike, but it is a lot cheaper than buying a half-dozen $1,000 - $2,000 bikes trying to figure out what you like. Besides, think of all the time you will be enjoying this bike while others are chasing something they can't find.
 

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You're the only person in this thread that can say whether a $4K bike is correct for you.

The lesson I learned away back when was that rather than set artificial limits on purchases, it was much better to spend the most I felt comfortable spending on what I wanted at the start. Because on several occasions, I'd buy a $1500 bike and then spend tons upgrading this and that to the point where I had the bike I wanted in the first place.

Don't go cheap if you're going to wish you had bought the more expensive one. Otherwise, you're going to end up spending $6K on two bikes to satsify a first, a bunch of internet posters and then, yourself.

And in that case, think about what bike you could have had for that same $6K.
 

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bondbike said:
I appreciate that one's budget is directly correlated to the content of one's wallet. For someone who has been a casual rider, and (after a few bike-a-thons) is looking to buy his first road bike, am I crazy to spend $4k? I am looking at a Serotta 2009 CDA. Will I likely after 6 mos regret not having spent half the amount because I didn't know what I didn't know? Am I on the righteous path or about to learn the hard way?
I'm going with it depends on the contents of your wallet...... Fact is, 4K is not that much to some and quite a bit to others..... If I had an unlimited budget when I was shopping for my first road bike(December/January/February)......I would have opened my search into a different range of bikes.

That said, there are many that would say that it was too much for a "starter bike."

I say figure a budget of what you are willing to just part with. Then let the shopping begin. You find something that feels great, you love the look of and it seems to call out to you to you from the garage......."Bondbike....come take me out on the road...." Having those bases covered and no worry about the out of pocket expense, how can you really go wrong......
 

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I am the wrong person to be answering this thread because I purchase these things with my heart (however cheesy that sounds) rather than logic. I bought a bike in the $4000 range as my first bike and have never regretted it. I just passed the 6 month mark actually, and still ride it day in and day out. What's worse is I bought it without riding it, instead riding a higher end model. I rode another brand's frame and absolutely hated the feel of it. Got on a bike with the same geometry I ride now and loved it.

But that works for me time and again for things like these. I could say more, but it is hard to write this poast without being too cliche.

As for the budgeting side of things, if you have a budget that allows for it, then go for it.
 

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bondbike said:
I appreciate that one's budget is directly correlated to the content of one's wallet. For someone who has been a casual rider, and (after a few bike-a-thons) is looking to buy his first road bike, am I crazy to spend $4k? I am looking at a Serotta 2009 CDA. Will I likely after 6 mos regret not having spent half the amount because I didn't know what I didn't know? Am I on the righteous path or about to learn the hard way?
You are nuts. You WILL learn the hard way. Get yourself a $1k bike. You have too much to learn regarding fit and geometry to risk it on a $4k bike, regardless of the pedigree of the manufacturer, shop, or fitter you use. Your body will undergo some serious position changes as you accrue miles, therefore the bike that felt right when you first started doing bikeathons will not feel right after a couple years. You need to EVOLVE to that Serotta. I'm not saying you don't DESERVE it; I'm saying it's not time yet. Get yourself an education on fit, position, and geometry. That $1k bike is part of the education.

Here's what one framebuilder had to say about building bikes for experienced riders versus newcomers:
"! A skilled builder needs to find out what the rider is looking for and turn that information into a finished bike. I prefer to deal with the more experienced rider. That makes my job easier. Let’s face it, no matter what, it is the legs that make the bike go and in many cases the newer rider has unrealistic expectations of what a new bike can do for him/her. I rely on experience and rider input to come up with a bike to make my client happy. "
 

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+1

gh1 said:
Dude if you have the coin and arent starving your kids or dogs to buy it then hell man, step up and buy it. If I won powerball I wouldnt be asking a bunch of internet clowns whether I should buy my first Ferrari.
Two or three years from now, you won't be wishing to upgrade. Ever since Serotta built bikes for the 7-Eleven team in the 80s, he's been up there with the best. Not even comparable to a 1500. lookalike, but if you got one of those, you wouldn't know the difference. If you're sure about size, go for it.
 
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