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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've riden on Speedplay X/2 pedals for 15 or so years. I love them. But, and there's always a but, I'm replacing the cleats every six months when I used to replace them every three years or so. The metal bars in the cleats are breaking on me.

To answer the questions:

1. I have not gained weight.
2. My riding style/mileage hasn't increased, it's probably gone down.
3. I don't walk in my cleats any more than I used to (minimally).
4. I've replaced the pedals once (about five years ago).
5. Same bike frame for past 15 years, and except for periodic wheel upgrades, same basic componentry.

The only thing I can think of is Speedplay is using cheaper metal for their cleats.

At any rate, If I can't get this figured out, I'm looking at switching pedal systems.
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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You're breaking the ring clamp spring?


Riding in foul weather more or not lubricating the cleats as much? I've never snapped an X ring clamp spring wire in all the years I've used them
 

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Been using Speedplay Zeros with Walkable cleats for the last few years. I have not experienced any problems with the springs.

If you walk a lot, or, like me, are heavy and push off hard, you will stretch the covers though. If stretched enough, they can interfere with them clipping in cleanly. Fortunately the walkable covers are cheap to replace.

I think I replaced the cleats twice over the last few years. Once when I got new shoes. Not because they were broken, but they were just looking really warn.

Speedplay recommends replacing the cleats every 3k-5k miles. I'm pretty sure I went more than double that on my last cleat.

How often should I replace my Zero cleats?
Replace cleats at least every 3000-5000 miles or sooner if the cleat parts show advanced wear. Lubricating the cleat springs with a dry-type (PTFE) lubricant, keeping the cleats free of dirt and debris by cleaning them regularly and using Zero Coffee Shop Caps (cleat covers) when walking will greatly extend the life of your cleats. Never ride on parts that are damaged or show excessive wear. If you have any doubts about worn parts or their serviceability contact Speedplay or your Speedplay dealer before riding. Never install cleats using any combination of new cleat parts and old cleat parts

And this is their cleat/pedal surface lube recommendation

How often should I lubricate the Zero cleats and bowties?
Applying a dry-type(PTFE)lubricant, such as SP-LUBE, Super-Lube Dry Film, RD-50, DuPont Performance Dry, Liquid Wrench Dry Lube, Pro Gold, or Finish Line Dry Lube, to the cleat springs and the cavity of the cleat where the pedal nests as often as before each ride will significantly prolong the life of the cleats and the pedals. The more often you lubricate the better the system will function.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, I think so. I don't know the proper name, but the two metal bars in the cleats that clip to the pedals, fore and aft. One will snap in half after about six months, so the contact is not as positive. I could probably lubricate them more often, riding less in foul weather than when I was a little younger. Perhaps the lubrication is the thing?
 

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Yes, I think so. I don't know the proper name, but the two metal bars in the cleats that clip to the pedals, fore and aft. One will snap in half after about six months, so the contact is not as positive. I lube them every few months as I always have, riding less in foul weather than when I was a little younger.
Interesting. Is it happening on both shoes? Did it start after you changed shoes?

I wonder if your cleat is a little distorted from the curve of your shoe sole? If you loosen the cleat mount screws, does the cleat rock back and forth? Or does it sit flat on the bottom of your shoe?

If the cleat deforms when you bolt it down, it will prevent that spring from moving freely. That, over time, could stress that spring enough to break prematurely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Curiously, it usually happens with the right foot first, even though I usually unclip the left at stops. The shoes are the same Sidi Genius ones I've had for years. But, they're old, and I wonder if you might be on to something migen21. Perhaps the sole has distorted with time so the cleats don't sit as flush as they used to. It might be my imagination, but perhaps the float I enjoyed when the shoes were young has diminished as the shoe aged. I've been looking for an excuse to buy new shoes. ;)
 
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