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banned from the museum
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DaveWC- yes, anything can fail, including a titanium frame.

That last picture is really scary, full weld failure on the top tube, I'll bet whoever forgot to take that bike off the roof rack before pulling into the garage had a really bad day.

I ride a Ti bike, and I'm very happy with it, but I wouldn't hesitate to replace it with a carbon bike if it ever fails or meets with an accident.

Since I've had my Ti bike for over 15 years, that may not be anytime soon, but I wouldn't mind a new Cervelo or Pinarello when the time comes!
Fixed it for you.

Any material can break. Any material can be noodly. Any material can be stiff. Can we stop arguing frame material now? Tires actually make a difference in ride quality. I just got my first pair of Vittoria 25 mm tires, and wow is all I can say. Smooooooooth!
 

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The last picture looks like the impact was below the head tube. A roof shot would break it in the other direction.
Yep, that last photo is clearly a frontal impact where the TT/HT weld failed during the impact. Most likely it was a collision with a car, though it could have been with anything solid - but the first part of the bike in that photo to hit something was the front wheel. The point is, that weld was a total failure. A good weld would have held to the point of tearing some of the frame material but that weld separated cleanly.

One time riding my Kestrel MXZ (mountain bike) I missed a hairpin and t-boned a tree stump so hard that the read derailleur cable popped completely out of the cable guides. All I had to do was to loosen the cable anchor bolt and re-adjust the cable. If the frame had been any type of alloy I am sure that the down tube would have looked like the one in that last photo. Conclusion: not all carbon is flimsy. Yes, some top of the line racing bikes are made with very thin carbon frames - but any bikes in that weight range will be susceptible to damage no matter what the material.

Honestly I have no horse in this race: I have four steel bikes, three carbon ones and two aluminum bikes. Of those I regularly ride one steel, the two aluminum (Kleins) and one of the carbons.
 

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Music Man
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I agree, any type of material can break, but after my experience with the Infinito, I just decided to go in a different direction after reading a lot of posts here, getting opinions of a lot of other riders, and talking to a lot of manufacturers of Ti bikes. Nothing wrong with going in a different direction, is there? As long as you're happy with your choice of material and you're riding happy on it, that's what counts the most. For now, I'm just happy that I got a 35% discount on the complete bike that made the cost, with upgrades, very competitive with a CF bike of the same class. Can't wait to get on it and ride.

As far as tires go, I agree! It makes a big difference too. I usually use Conti Gatorskins 700 x 25, but may try something else when the bike arrives. I need puncture proof tires around here in Florida.
 

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untitled
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All frames have the ability to fail. So if Ti fails I guess you abandon that for steel. I can see deciding that Bianchi is not a company you want to deal with but if you abandon entire swaths of the products available you could be riding bamboo before long.
Thanks for that. Love the documentation you provided. I've put app. 100 miles per week on my [Specialized] carbon frame for the last 4 years, and have been involved in at least 2 incidents where the frame went down hard onto asphalt or concrete, once after the derailleur hanger let loose and sent the entire RD through the rear spokes. Another time I went down hard when another rider braked in front of me. Handlebar and grips both bent beyond repair. In both cases, the bike was examined and repaired - with zero damage to the frame. Moreover, the bike shop I purchased it from has consistently assured me that if the frame fails for ANY reason, they'll replace it at no cost to me. And that warranty is backed up by the very few who have utilized it.

I went to toast a slice of bread yesterday, and noticed a bit of mold on one of the slices. Must I now give up eating bread?
 

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I went to toast a slice of bread yesterday, and noticed a bit of mold on one of the slices. Must I now give up eating bread?
Bread is prone to mold. I once left the bread out and some mold developed (a day *prior* to the expiration date) and the store gave me two options: return half a loaf and get a half store credit or just cut off that edge of the slice and keep eating. Well, I took the store credit and donated the remaining loaf to a food pantry for a tax write off. There are horror stories about people accidentally sitting on their loafs and the loafs failing. On my baking forum, there are countless threads on bread failing every week. Not me. I switched to biscotti and never looked back. It just has a feel that you can't get from plain bread.
 

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Please don't modify other forum member's quotations - it's bad form, and disrespectful to the other member, and misleading to other forum readers.
That's a fairly typical practice. And he did put the changes in bold as well as indicating that he had "fixed that for you".

In your case it would be better if you quoted the person you're referring to when you make a post like you just did as it isn't obvious who you are talking about.
 

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la dolce vita
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I have no proof and may be wrong, but I'd be inclined to believe that people tend to keep steel and titanium bikes longer. Since they tend to be more durable and lend themselves to repair much easier than carbon or aluminum, there's no reason to discard them after a few years (besides just wanting a different frame). The whole n+1 thing not withstanding, if you have one or two bikes you like that you know will last without any special care (beyond normal wrenching), you wouldn't be looking to replace those bikes every couple of years. No bike shop is gonna keep items in stock that aren't gonna sell but one or two every six months (if they're lucky).
I own a Ti bike, hence my handle, but when I was shopping around I remember going into a Boulder CO bike shop and when the owner heard I was looking for Ti, he said "if I sell you Ti, I will never see you again."
 

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DaveWC - I hit "reply" directly under the message - I thought that it would order my reply under the message I was replying to, I guess it doesn't do that.

As to altering other member's quotes, it may be common, but it shouldn't be.
 

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Music Man
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My son in law had a warranty issue with Bianchi and it was not resolved in a satisfactory manner. But years ago I bought a Specialized Allez that was seriously defective and they refused to warranty it.

Not sure how Bianchi is doing financially but Specialized has not been bothered one bit from my lifelong boycott.
One more reason to buy a Specialized. Some stand behind their warranty 100%. Some stand aside and don't want to warranty their bikes.
 

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DaveWC - I hit "reply" directly under the message - I thought that it would order my reply under the message I was replying to, I guess it doesn't do that.

As to altering other member's quotes, it may be common, but it shouldn't be.
happens all the time (to many of us). fair warning was given in bold and "fixed it for you". Effective and humorous way to make a point.
we take it in stride. Unless poster is annoyed, no reason why you should be
 

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As to altering other member's quotes, it may be common, but it shouldn't be.
Ok then. I did more than simply say it's a common practice. I tried to explain to you why it's not bad form, and is not disrespectful to you, and why no one would be mislead into thinking that your quote was unaltered. But if you're determined to be put out go for it.
 

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One more reason to buy a Specialized. Some stand behind their warranty 100%. Some stand aside and don't want to warranty their bikes.
thanks for the tip.

Or you may want to consider bicycles that probably will never fail if you are just a recreational rider...

the steel touring bicycle.

and for 99% of us, probably the only bicycle you will need anyway. my Fuji Touring bicycle was chosen because the legendary toughness of these machines. no wimpy light weight bicycles spoken here, NO WAY!!!

Other bikes in the running would be the Legendary Trek Touring bike, Nashbar Touring bicycle and perhaps the Bikes Direct Motobecane and Windsor toughy touring bikes.

The King of all these bikes is probably the Surly Long Haul Trucker, take a peak under the hood of this beefy ride and get wowed by The frame’s tubing which is thicker-walled and larger-diameter than standard road and sport-touring frames.

That should give pause to any silly carbon framed thoughts buzzing in one's head.

Surly goes on and over the top, and may i quote their website: Like all our frames, it’s made of CroMoly steel. You’ll probably never need to have the frame repaired, but if you do you’re more likely to find someone who can weld steel than someone who can weld titanium or aluminum. Repair carbon fiber in the middle of Mongolia? Good luck with that.

Who needs aluminum, carbon, titanium when CroMoly steel is the Real Deal! :thumbsup:
 

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one of the reason why I ride almost Ti is the belief that these frames don't fail catastrophically.
Looking at these pictures, I'm kinda scared...
As said so many times...any material can break.
The skill of the designer and builder is far more important than the material.
And matching the frame to the intended purpose is just as important. A friend of mine got a Merlin Extralight frame because he was a weight weenie and the thing broke right away. But a heavy duty Sandvik-made Kona Score would last forever.
 

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As said so many times...any material can break.
The skill of the designer and builder is far more important than the material.
And matching the frame to the intended purpose is just as important. A friend of mine got a Merlin Extralight frame because he was a weight weenie and the thing broke right away. But a heavy duty Sandvik-made Kona Score would last forever.
thanks for confirming my suspicions about weight weenie bikes.
 

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untitled
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Bread is prone to mold. I once left the bread out and some mold developed (a day *prior* to the expiration date) and the store gave me two options: return half a loaf and get a half store credit or just cut off that edge of the slice and keep eating. Well, I took the store credit and donated the remaining loaf to a food pantry for a tax write off. There are horror stories about people accidentally sitting on their loafs and the loafs failing. On my baking forum, there are countless threads on bread failing every week. Not me. I switched to biscotti and never looked back. It just has a feel that you can't get from plain bread.
Made my day. But only after I read it the second time. Thanks.
 
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One more reason to buy a Specialized. Some stand behind their warranty 100%. Some stand aside and don't want to warranty their bikes.

Possibly you misread my post. I boycott Specialized because my brand new Specialized Allez (1982 model) was seriously defective and Specialized refused to warranty it. So I boycott Specialized products. I have purchased many bicycles over the years for my kids, wife and myself. None of them are Specialized.

My theory is one we have all heard.

Fool me once, "shame on you", fool me twice "shame on me".


Anyway the garage is full of bikes that belong to all of us. None are Specialized. I think there are 14 bikes in the garage at the moment. 2 of them are my bikes. A Cannondale and a Lighthouse.
 

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Possibly you misread my post. I boycott Specialized because my brand new Specialized Allez (1982 model) was seriously defective and Specialized refused to warranty it. So I boycott Specialized products. I have purchased many bicycles over the years for my kids, wife and myself. None of them are Specialized.

My theory is one we have all heard.

Fool me once, "shame on you", fool me twice "shame on me".


Anyway the garage is full of bikes that belong to all of us. None are Specialized. I think there are 14 bikes in the garage at the moment. 2 of them are my bikes. A Cannondale and a Lighthouse.
Hmmm... that 1982 Specialized was a CroMoly steel frame. I guess that people are going to have to go to a straight gauge hi-tensile steel frame if they don't want to risk a broken fame...
 
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