Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,583 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
That may be a stupid question. I just do not know.

I am very new to cycling and I am training for motocross. I recently had test run and my vo2max was freakishly low.

I read a comment on another thread that said if you lose weight your vo2max will go up.

Is this quantifiable?

Thanks
 

·
Impulse Athletic Coaching
Joined
·
5,576 Posts
What was your VO2max?

Absolute VO2max is measured in liters of O2/minute. Relative VO2max is measured in milliliters O2/kilogram body weight/minute. It's not too hard to convert from one to another if you have your test handy.

I guess the easiest way is to multiply your relative VO2max by your weight during the test (in kg). Then, divide by your target weight (in kg).

Eg, 45ml/kg/min and you weighed 80kg for the test. If you want to know your approximate VO2max at a certain weight, for example:

At 75kg: 45*80/75=48ml/kg/min
At 70kg: 45*80/70=51ml/kg/min

As you can see, weight has plays a part, but it's not huge. Don't expect to hit 75ml/kg/min if you are at 45. Also note, that in order to lose your weight, you will probably be riding a lot more for a longer period of time. That can also increase your VO2, somewhat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,583 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply.

The test results show my Vo2 max was 27.7 ml/kg/min. But they mistakingly put my weight in as 154 it was actually 145 and has since dropped to 140.

The data for vo2 L/min was 1.828

I thought that I read somewhere vo2 max was genetic and couldnt really be improved. Is that true?

I think I understand that you were telling me that since weight is part of the formula for vo2 max then of course the number will rise in relation to weight if the weight goes down.

Does that mean that if your vo2 number goes up due to weight loss you may not have improved your fitness?
 

·
waterproof*
Joined
·
41,611 Posts
vo2 can be trained; in fact one of my favorite kinds of intervals is sometimes called "vo2 intervals"

but yeah, I think the conventional wisdom is, even though you can train it, you're not likely to go from "average" to "superstar" scores.

but take heart, vo2 is only one of many factors that decide racing performance. and a lot of people think it's a relatively minor one.
 

·
Cycling Coach
Joined
·
1,734 Posts
151 said:
Thanks for the reply.

The test results show my Vo2 max was 27.7 ml/kg/min. But they mistakingly put my weight in as 154 it was actually 145 and has since dropped to 140.

The data for vo2 L/min was 1.828

I thought that I read somewhere vo2 max was genetic and couldnt really be improved. Is that true?

I think I understand that you were telling me that since weight is part of the formula for vo2 max then of course the number will rise in relation to weight if the weight goes down.

Does that mean that if your vo2 number goes up due to weight loss you may not have improved your fitness?
VO2 Max can be improved through training but yes there is a genetic component/limit as well.

But really, I wouldn't worry too much about VO2 Max numbers. It's sustainable power output that matters from a fitness change assessment perspective, and changes to your power output are due to more than just changes to your VO2 Max.
 

·
Impulse Athletic Coaching
Joined
·
5,576 Posts
Creakyknees said:
vo2 can be trained; in fact one of my favorite kinds of intervals is sometimes called "vo2 intervals"

but yeah, I think the conventional wisdom is, even though you can train it, you're not likely to go from "average" to "superstar" scores.

but take heart, vo2 is only one of many factors that decide racing performance. and a lot of people think it's a relatively minor one.
I'd love to believe that, but try doing multiple laps on a course with a 5min hill that is attacked every lap by a bunch of 1/2s.

But, I agree, it's only one part of many that make for success in racing. Train your weaknesses, race your strengths.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top