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I'm gonna be totally honest with you.

You aren't asking very good questions, which makes it really hard to get good answers.

Can you make the bike lighter? Surely, just fork over a bunch of money on lightweight wheels and components.

Is that going to make it faster? NOPE!

The only thing that will make it go faster is the human riding it.

Someone else can tell you what the dollar per gram cost is to lighten a bike (I have no clue myself - weight is never a consideration for me, but it's *really* expensive). I can tell you that it's going to make nearly ZERO difference in the speed of the bike.

Now as far as riding 'better'. That's a slightly better question, but still too vague.

What is it you don't like about it now? Uncomfortable? Hands, Butt? Feet? Knees? Too much vibration? Too jarring on bumps?

I'm going to quote a post by "Mike T" from this forum just yesterday. This post should be a popup for every new user to this site.

Here is how you make your bike 'ride better'.

A proper fitting by a competent person.
Correct tire pressures for you. (Note: This is probably MUCH lower than you think - migen21)
The ideal tires for you.
The perfect saddle for you.
The rider (fitness, core strength, mobility).


Lowering your tire pressure as low as you can without risking a pinch flat is the single best upgrade you can make to the 'ride' of your bike, and it's FREE. It will make it ride smoother, less fatigue to the rider, track better in sketchy conditions, handle and grip better in turns, etc... I would start there. Once the bike is riding 'better', spend more time riding it. That is how it will get faster.

Edit to add: If you are running a really skinny tire (i.e. 23mm) running lower pressures can risk pinch flats. I think this is what Mike T was hinting at with his suggestion about 'tires for you'. When new tires time comes around, get the widest tires you can fit on that frame with those wheels, then follow the advice above about lower pressure.
 

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What Migen21 says is pretty much correct and changing components just for weight's sake won't drastically improve your performance.

That said, while it's not the lightest frame in the world overall it's a good bike for its time. New wheels might make you happy, you could update/upgrade the cockpit for bling's sake.

Blue book might say it isn't worth a ton but it's not a bad bike and upgradable.

Edit: I forgot, I had a similar frame and one upgrade I made due to necessity (broken) was the fork. Changed to a Ritchey WCS and honestly could notice better handling. Ran between $200-$250 though.
 

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I generally agree with Migen21 and jetdog9. You already have a solid bike, so the year doesn't much matter.

As for enhancements... 'ride better' (to me) means 'ride smoother', so I agree tires and pressures are the place to start. If you're running 23's, consider 25's. If you're running 25's, consider 28's, even if they'll only fit at the rear. You can run 28's (rear) and 25's (front). From there, experiment with tire pressures. A search will get you a chart or two you can use a guide.

Component-wise, the bike is already spec'd with 10 speed 105, and even that year/ version was solid, so my advice is to stay with it. They do spec no name brakes, but if they're operating smoothly/ efficiently, no reason to change there. You may want to consider KoolStop salmon pads. Cheap, and they may make a noticeable difference in braking.

As to the bikes gearing, if it works for you, stay with it. Don't fix what ain't broke.

Looks like your fork is full CF. Can't get much better than that. A bit lighter, maybe. But at what cost?

I initially thought a wheelset upgrade *may* save some weight, but (as an example) going from your Aksium's to something like Fulcrum 5's, you'd only save about 8-9 ounces. Not worth the $200+ cost.

Lastly, if the bike fits and is comfortable to ride, I wouldn't change contact points. If OTOH you see room for improvement, consider getting a bike fit. Just make sure it's from a reputable fitter, or you could introduce fit issues you don't have presently.

Just as a FYI, I have an '08 Tarmac Comp. I ride a lot, so have replaced wheelsets a couple of times, changed gearing as terrrain and fitness changed, but it's essentially remained as I purchased it. I'm thinking of tearing it down and repainting it 'just cuz', rebuilding it and riding it a few more years. Point is, if you like your bike, buck the trend of new=better and personalize your bike as you see fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i enjoy the bike, basically i was wondering if a newer bike would ride better, or upgrading it would give me a better feel for the road.

im into cars , technology has changed so much. A Porsche of the 80s isnt going to perform like a newer one.

thanks for all the replies!
 

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i enjoy the bike, basically i was wondering if a newer bike would ride better, or upgrading it would give me a better feel for the road.

im into cars , technology has changed so much. A Porsche of the 80s isnt going to perform like a newer one.

thanks for all the replies!
It's a cost benefit analysis kind of thing and I actually don't think it is a ridiculous question to be honest. I wouldn't invest more money on that bike if it were me. I think you would get a lot more value by going with a newer bike like an Allez Smartweld, Sprint, or (entry level) Tarmac, etc. Now, if your plan is to upgrade components anyway, your frame is solid like other folks have said and it may be more economical to get the wheels and components you want now and then upgrade the frame once you replenish you bike budget, etc. The reverse can be done as well, keep the wheels and components you currently have and then just add a sweet frame to ride. Components and wheels can be upgraded a little at time down the road, etc.
 

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One of the most single pieces of equipment that made me go faster was a power meter. I'm a numbers person and knowing that, I push to get the numbers higher. Aero wheels helped a bit too.

What people forget the most is that when you are excited about going on a ride, you tend to be faster. Having new equipment will usually get the pulse up knowing you got the fastest wheels, components, helmet, etc. It always comes down to the engine and whatever motivates the engine to go faster is a good thing.

Another cheap investment is a good strong group ride. Pick a ground of riders that are slightly better than you. Your ego to be better will get you in the front real soon. Don't settle for being the leader, there is always a stronger group out there.

Whatever you do, have fun and keep stretching for new heights.
 
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