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A few years back I received a Trek Madone 5.9 as a replacement for a LeMond Zurich on which the rear dropout cratered after 7 years. A gift horse for sure.
However, the rear brake is mounted under the frame just behind the bottom bracket and adjusting it is not a completely simple process. One has to thread a 2mm hex key into the high or low limit screw and position the caliper from outside of the crank, that's not so bad. But what is bad is that the set screws frequently work their way loose and the right side caliper then starts rubbing against the rim.
At one point I pulled the crank and installed new set screws and used Loctite to "cement" them in place, this held for about 6 months. So in frustration I took it to an LBS near me and had them do the adjustment as they stated that one of their guys really had this issue dialed in. It looked good when I got it but as soon as I changed the tire I realized that his fix seemed to be to really tighten the quick release while applying pressure to the side of the rim to hold it away from the brake pad. Hell I could do that! Besides I think the additional torque on the races and bearings of the wheel would cause premature wear and failure.
After thinking about it for a little while I decided that I could bias the wheel over without putting undue strain on the bearings. My solution is to add some temporary washers to the left side of the wheel axle when I put it on the truing stand and retrue the wheel. This caused the rim to center about 2-3mm to the left of true center and pulled it away from the brake pad. I took it out for a 40 mile ride and tried to be attentive to the handling. It tracks straight even when riding without hands on the bars and I couldn't feel any difference in handling or turning. Can anyone think of a compelling reason why this won't work as a long term solution? Thanks for any comments. Cheers :cool:
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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As long as you don't feel anything weird it should be fine. Those brakes do tend to find their way out of adjustment on a regular basis. Another fix would be try a Shimano brake, they seem to hold adjustment better.
 
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