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I recently had two flats, I thought I checked the tire thoroughly for anything stuck in there but saw nothing, after the second flat though I took the tire off and went through every inch really really close. I found two tiny tiny pieces of glass that were around where the puncture was. So small I had to take out with a tweezers. Is this normal for road tires? I'm coming from mtn background so the tires are a lot thicker, if those pieces were in a mtn tire they never would have made it through but these little ones did. Could it be the make of tire? They're the stock specialized ones that came on the bike. Are there tires that are still light weight but more resistant to little bits of glass?
 

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I have the semi-cheap Specialized Mondo 700x23C tires, and I get glass and rocks in them all of the time. I have to pick them out with a mini screw driver, etc about once a week. I don't generally get flats from them. I'm not sure it's common on higher end tires...

-Dan
 

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If it is sharp enough to puncture the rubber and kevlar belt (assuming your tire has one), then it can be pretty small and still work it's way through the tire to the tube. Glass usually reflects light pretty well, so using a strong flashlight or halogen work light can help. Be aware also that sometimes the glass, or whatever is causing the flat, can "hide" in the tear in the tire after it is deflated. If you can find the tear in the tire, make sure that there is nothing inside that hole.

Wait until you pick up a bit of wire from a car tire's steel belt. That is almost impossible to see - sometimes the wire causing your flat is finer than a hair. The best way I've found to find something small like that is to locate the approximate location by matching the tube with the tire, and then run a cotton ball lightly along the inside of the tire. The wire will snag on the cotton and you can find it then.



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It's fairly common. Every time I get a flat I check the tire tread carefully for imbedded items. It's most likely when you get repeated flats or slow leaks with the same tire. The worst case I ever had was a small piece of wire that was barely visible.
 

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After getting four flats in a week shortly after I got my Scott I replaced the stock Continental Ultra Race with Maxxis Re-Fuse. That was over 2,000 miles ago and I haven't had a flat since. The tires are starting to look a bit worn so it's probably time I got new ones.
 

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You had the key there when you said stock Specialized tires that came with the bike. That means the tires were not the absolute best for flat protection. I went and asked my LBS on which was the best...they responded with Maxxis Re-Fuse. So far no flats after 700 plus miles.
 

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It is common.
It is more common in the spring as more debris is along the sides of the road.
There is not much you can do to prevent flats other than keeping a weather eye out when riding, trying to avoid debris as best and safely as you can.
Flat "resistant" tires are only adequate until they wear. The thinner the rubber the more vulnerable they are to punctures.
 

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Le Misérable
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Hooben said:
You had the key there when you said stock Specialized tires that came with the bike. That means the tires were not the absolute best for flat protection. [...]
That's putting it mildly.:) While no tire is immune to flats, there is a massive difference between what came on your bike and what's available on the flat-resistant market. I've been using Hutchinson Intensive for the last two seasons and have had exactly two flats over many thousands of kms; when commuting in the city about 10 years ago I put Armadillos on my flatbar road bike and had zero flats in 4 years; however, the last new bike I bought came with Rubinos (not Rubino Pros, just Rubinos, didn't even know they existed) so I thought I'd try them, but I ended up junking them within a few hundred miles because I flatted all the freaking time.

The really flat-resistant tires are a little heavier and don't offer the smoothest ride possible, but IMO it's a fair trade-off for not flatting very much.
 

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really common flats. things that are hard to see and avoid. wire from tire belts are the nastiest Always run your fingers on the inside of the tire and inspect your tires regularly before after rides. Rainy day rides are times when you will pick these up in the tires.
 

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What Would Google Do.
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its normal/common.
you can get heavier tyres and more puncture resistent* ones whose threshold for puncturing is higher usually. but they are heavier and 'heavier' on roads its all compromise
 

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When I get a flat with no apparent cause I not only run my fingers through, and look in the tire, but take the tire, turn it inside out, and stretch it a bit. Sometimes you can find tiny bits of tire eating stuff that way.
 

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I get really nervous if I get a flat and can't find the reason. Makes me think if I put in a new tube it will go flat as well. Sometimes you run over something, and it causes a puncture, but doesn't stick to the tire. I really look hard for the culprit, and do wipe my tires with glove to possibly dislodge something before it causes a flat. Not sure if wiping really helps, but it makes me feel better.

john
 

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I always carry two spare tubes in my saddle bag. Last year 8 miles from the truck I got a flat. Replaced it and kept going. Then I got a 2nd flat about a mile later. Both times I removed the tire completely and didn't see anything causing the problem. Decided with no more spares to head back to the truck. 3 Miles from the truck it went flat again.

The only funny part of the story (now not that day) was it was one of those not to cold but cool days. I stopped to take off my jacket and when I turned around I saw a "Trail Guide" flying past me just out of shouting range. He had no idea I was in trouble he thought I was just taking off my jacket. When I was within eyesight of my truck someone finally stopped to offer help.

Both he and my LBS said don't use tire wrenches when changing a flat. Just use you hands. I got new tubes and a puncture resistant tire.I have had one flat since then (blowout at the valve stem) replaced it by hand and have been fine since.
 

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jmlapoint said:
I get really nervous if I get a flat and can't find the reason. Makes me think if I put in a new tube it will go flat as well. Sometimes you run over something, and it causes a puncture, but doesn't stick to the tire. I really look hard for the culprit, and do wipe my tires with glove to possibly dislodge something before it causes a flat. Not sure if wiping really helps, but it makes me feel better.

john
That is cool John. I usually run my glove over the tires whenever I run over debris, especially glass. It normally dislodge whatever **** that the tires pick up. It does helps....be it tubular and clinchers.
 

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If you decide to rub off the debris while riding, be careful because you don't want to jam your hand into the space between your rear tire and brake calipers...

I like to check my tires very carefully every now and then and pick out the crap embedded. I found 2 tiny slivers of glass and a microscopic wire stuck in them just the other day -- no doubt that wire was a flat-to-be averted... :)
 
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