Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone. I've decided to use cycling as a way to lose weight and try to improve my health. I am currently 330 pounds, 6'5". A friend gave me his used bike to help with my goals and I'm concerned about whether or not it is appropriate for my weight. It is called a Giant Defy Advanced bike. It has a flat bar with the shifters on it rather than the ram's horn handlebar it originally came with. The wheels are 32 spokes in the front and back.
My main concern is that the frame is made of carbon fiber. Before I was given the Giant, my plan was to purchase a Steel framed bike. My question is this, would I be better off purchasing a steel framed bike to use until I lose the first 80-100 pounds of weight? Or does the current set up seem okay to use from the beginning?
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
Many manufacturers do place weight limits on CF framesets. For example, IIRC Specialized has a limit of 220 lbs. I'd advise you to check with Giant on that. You'll probably need the model year and/ or serial number.

Just as an aside, most weight limits imposed are to provide the manufacturer with an out on warranty coverage in the even of frame failure. Yours being used has no warranty, but still, you don't want to suffer a failure and crash.. or worse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
PJ352, thank you for the good advice. I will visit the local Giant Dealer and see if I can get some information about weight limits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,493 Posts
I'd be more concerned with the tire size. The Giant Defy will not fit tires which should be more appropriately sized for your weight.

I'd recommend a mountain bike or hybrid bike with no suspension front or rear, and tires anywhere from 1.5-2" in width. You can evolve to a bike such as the Giant as your weight comes down.

The Giant was a gift, so there's no harm done if you break it in the process of riding. And I highly doubt if the frame broke it would be a catastrophic failure leading to injury, even at your weight.

It would be sort of uncool to not ride the bike as it was a gift intended for your benefit, said Ann Landers ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,492 Posts
At your weight, the primary consideration is wheels and tires.

The major problem in using the gift bike is that it appears not to be possible to fit a tire wider than 25 mm.

At a weight of 330# + 20# for the bike, the recommended tire pressures for 25mm would be 127 psi front and 195 psi rear. Clearly impossible.

OP, you need a frame capable of taking 40mm tires minimum. At your weight the inflations would be around 60 psi front, 85 psi rear which would likely be within the range of recommended pressures for that size tire. (my 40 mm Clement MSO's are marked 55-90 psi).

As @peter suggests, this is going to be a cyclocross frame or rigid MTB. Wheels will need to be very sturdy, probably built with 36 spokes minimum.

Bicycle tire pressure calculator

Anyone know the weight limit of the giant Defy Advanced? - Bike Forums
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks to everyone for taking the time to share your thoughts. I will hold on to the Giant for my leaner cycling days. I am looking at a steel Kona Roadhouse bicycle. I've been assured that my weight will not be an issue and I can have wider tires and strong wheels installed. I've read some nice reviews that mention the Kona's weight, which with my mass won't make much of an impact. If anyone has some thoughts on this bike I would like to hear them. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,493 Posts
I haven't seen pictures of you, but looking at the Kona Roadhouse, I don't think it would be a good choice for you.

I'll guess you have a lot of girth, which may prohibit you from reaching over comfortably to the handlebars on a road bike, which are typically lower than a hybrid or mountain bike.

I'd suggest a hybrid or mountain bike with a rigid fork.
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
Pretty solid specs on the Roadhouse. On paper, at least, it looks to be a good choice, IMO.

Of course, test ride before deciding, but (as one example) the Spec Roubaix's frame stack is ~2 CM's less than the Roadhouse, so with some tweaking to fit, the Roadhouse should lend itself to a more upright/ relaxed riding position.
 

·
Off the back
Joined
·
1,850 Posts
A fellow rider in my parts was about your size, before he began cycling. He lost a good 120 lbs! And that was 25 years ago! Powerful cyclist who's won masters category races and put the hurt on us many times at the lead of our huge group rides.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,492 Posts

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
14,443 Posts
Thanks to everyone for taking the time to share your thoughts. I will hold on to the Giant for my leaner cycling days. I am looking at a steel Kona Roadhouse bicycle. I've been assured that my weight will not be an issue and I can have wider tires and strong wheels installed. I've read some nice reviews that mention the Kona's weight, which with my mass won't make much of an impact. If anyone has some thoughts on this bike I would like to hear them. Thanks again.

Good idea to wait until you are leaner before you use the Giant. If it's carbon, that was an expensive gift and you don't want to ruin it. Most road bikes have a weight limit of 250lbs. or less. You will get there, so be patient.

I don't think the Kona Roadhouse would be a good bike for you. This is more of a gravel/adventure bike, probably not a good choice. The stock tires are only 700x30c which are too narrow for you. The wheels are a low 24 spoke count, light weight road type and will not last very long for you. The frame itself appears robust enough to handle your weight, though I am very concerned about the carbon fork.

A complete steel touring bike like these would be a better choice:

Long Haul Trucker | Bikes | Surly Bikes

520 | Trek Bikes

These are touring bikes, so they are designed to take a lot of weight. They also have 36 spoke wheels which is what you should be riding. Another plus for a touring bike is that you will get much better low gearing (26/36/48T triple crankset) which will allow you to ride up hills easier. With the Kona's 34/50T crankset, you will be walking up those hills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,658 Posts
I'd suggest getting a cheap hybrid or even beach cruiser type.
One of two things will likely happen. you don't stick with it or you lose a bunch of weight, decide you'll get serious and in the process learn what type of bike suites the type of riding you want to focus on and what type of bike fit would be best. With your weight you really can't ride what's a good bike bike for the person you may become even if you were to guess correctly on fit and style correctly so either way there's no point in investing much at this point.

A lot of serious and talented riders got there from getting a hybrid and the snowball effect. Even when you advance beyond typical hybrid riding it's still nice to have on for running to the store and stuff like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,492 Posts
Good idea to wait until you are leaner before you use the Giant. If it's carbon, that was an expensive gift and you don't want to ruin it. Most road bikes have a weight limit of 250lbs. or less. You will get there, so be patient.

I don't think the Kona Roadhouse would be a good bike for you. This is more of a gravel/adventure bike, probably not a good choice. The stock tires are only 700x30c which are too narrow for you. The wheels are a low 24 spoke count, light weight road type and will not last very long for you. The frame itself appears robust enough to handle your weight, though I am very concerned about the carbon fork.

A complete steel touring bike like these would be a better choice:

Long Haul Trucker | Bikes | Surly Bikes

520 | Trek Bikes

These are touring bikes, so they are designed to take a lot of weight. They also have 36 spoke wheels which is what you should be riding. Another plus for a touring bike is that you will get much better low gearing (26/36/48T triple crankset) which will allow you to ride up hills easier. With the Kona's 34/50T crankset, you will be walking up those hills.
^ this advice is better than mine. I hadn't looked at the wheels on the Kona. You need as a minimum 36 spoke sturdy wheels, with wider (24 mm) rims, and 40 mm tires.
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
I am looking at a steel Kona Roadhouse bicycle. I've been assured that my weight will not be an issue and I can have wider tires and strong wheels installed.
To those voicing concerns re: wheels/ tires, it's already been addressed by the OP above.

OP, there are a wealth of choices out there. You just need to settle on exactly what will best keep you motivated to ride... consistently.

Personally, I think there's a lot to like about the Roadhouse, but would suggest spending a bit less and consider the Wheelhouse... assuming it'll accommodate your anatomy and wider tires.
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
14,443 Posts
To those voicing concerns re: wheels/ tires, it's already been addressed by the OP above.

OP, there are a wealth of choices out there. You just need to settle on exactly what will best keep you motivated to ride... consistently.

Personally, I think there's a lot to like about the Roadhouse, but would suggest spending a bit less and consider the Wheelhouse... assuming it'll accommodate your anatomy and wider tires.

OK, he did mention that wheels and tires could be swapped out.

I am still concerned about a carbon fork for a 330lb. person. I still think a touring bike would be a better choice.
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
OK, he did mention that wheels and tires could be swapped out.

I am still concerned about a carbon fork for a 330lb. person. I still think a touring bike would be a better choice.
Understood. I'm not trying to stifle discussion, just point out that the wheel/ tire concerns are a non-issue. Most any reputable LBS will swap those out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,492 Posts
Understood. I'm not trying to stifle discussion, just point out that the wheel/ tire concerns are a non-issue. Most any reputable LBS will swap those out.
They are the main issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I am truly thankful for all the replies and advice offered here. Thank you. Later this afternoon I am test riding some of the Kona bikes and, if I have time, will try to explore the hybrid and Trek bikes mentioned as well.
I don't intend to be the guy with the bike with one ride in the garage. I'm looking at bike riding as a new adventure that I can incorporate into my day to day life. In fact, I'm hoping to add many years to my life by cycling my way to a level of fitness I lost after College, many many years ago.
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
I'm impressed with Kona's current line-up, but it's a good plan to branch out and test ride other makes/ models.

I think at this point you're savvy enough to know what questions to ask of LBS's and what to look for in bikes.
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
Top