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Finally, homeopathic remedies must be labeled saying there is no scientific evidence supporting their efficacy. It took forever, but now the consumer must be notified of what these preparations really are: pseudoscientific woo woo. For the consumers who simply don't care what science says, there is at least some consolation in knowing they can't overdose.

https://www.ftc.gov/system/files/do...athic_drug_enforcement_policy_st atement.pdf

In case you weren't aware of how ridiculous homeopathy is, James Randi will tell you.

 

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I didn't watch the video, but I've read plenty about homeopathy. In the catalog of mumbo-jumbo methodologies, it occupies a special place. To claim that a dose of substance that has been so diluted that it contains literally not one molecule of the purported active agent is nonetheless effective because the water somehow "remembers" the now-vanished stuff is quite remarkable. The fact that people spend money on such preparations is a testament to the power of gullibility and marketing (and the placebo effect).
 

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Schuylkill Trail Bum
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When I lived in Philly, the tap water there remembered being muddy, polluted, and full of stinky fish Schuylkill River water.

You could taste and smell that water memory now and then. Even a brita filter couldn't completely give philly water amnesia.
 

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The fact that people spend money on such preparations is a testament to the power of gullibility and marketing (and the placebo effect).

The fact that people don't care about mountains of evidence makes me wonder if it's even unethical to "scam" then. If they're being scammed willingly, is it even a scam? :idea:

People seem to confuse "homeopathy" with "natural" or "herbal." At least this will educate those who lump them all in together.
 

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The fact that people spend money on such preparations is a testament to the power of gullibility and marketing (and the placebo effect).

The fact that people don't care about mountains of evidence makes me wonder if it's even unethical to "scam" then. If they're being scammed willingly, is it even a scam? :idea:

People seem to confuse "homeopathy" with "natural" or "herbal." At least this will educate those who lump them all in together.
Valid point. As humans if we want to believe something we have an amazing ability to filter out facts
 
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