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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How about with some sort of lattice?

Our house is a plain block of brick that could use a bit of character. The ivy in the front yard/planter is going nuts, and could be trained to go up the front wall, but I'm sure it would be best with something for it to climb besides the old brick.

Have read up and am aware that it could be a problem, but it seems to be used often enough that there must be a way to do it properly?
 

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How about with some sort of lattice?

Our house is a plain block of brick that could use a bit of character. The ivy in the front yard/planter is going nuts, and could be trained to go up the front wall, but I'm sure it would be best with something for it to climb besides the old brick.

Have read up and am aware that it could be a problem, but it seems to be used often enough that there must be a way to do it properly?
If you ever take down the ivy you will find that the ivy has left permanent marks where it attached itself to the brick. My parents did the ivy thing on their brick house and regretted it
 

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Ivy has no problem climbing up brick. just got back inside from ripping it away yet again from the side of the house, including a window screen. The pictures of the Ivy covered English cottages look quaint but I've seriously considered renting a flamethrower and torching everything in my yard just to get rid of that crap.
 

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Ivy is great if you enjoy tuck pointing.
 

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It's worked at Wrigley Field pretty well! Used to love going to the Cubs games when I lived there.....nothing, NOTHING, in the world like getting to the game early, walking up to your seats during batting practice and coming out to the sound of the organ music, the sun of day baseball, the smell of popcorn and cotton candy and beer....loads and loads of beer, and the ivy on the brick walls of the outfield. Damn, I miss Chicago in the summer! :)
 

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Ivy is great if you enjoy tuck pointing.
this, it is incredibly hard on already bad mortar joints, and it will literally send roots into wood on a house

Self-clinging climbers such as Boston ivy and Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus sp.) do not usually cause damage to wall surfaces, but common or English ivy (Hedera helix sp.) supports itself by aerial roots and where these penetrate cracks or joints they may cause structural damage. Sound masonry is unaffected.
 

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this, it is incredibly hard on already bad mortar joints, and it will literally send roots into wood on a house
Exactly. The vines "roots" will exploit any weakness or crack in the mortar or brick and grow into it. It looks nice until you realize that it is physically breaking your house apart.
 

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I once saw a hanger that was attached to the eaves from hooks. It was in essence a wire mesh screen that was about a foot away from the wall for vines to grow on. By doing so it allowed air circulation behind the vines as well and in this use, allowed the owner to unhook the screen and lay it down for cleaning and painting behind it as needed.
 

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I once saw a hanger that was attached to the eaves from hooks. It was in essence a wire mesh screen that was about a foot away from the wall for vines to grow on. By doing so it allowed air circulation behind the vines as well and in this use, allowed the owner to unhook the screen and lay it down for cleaning and painting behind it as needed.
any ivy I have ever seen would go through the mesh and be on the wall as well as the mesh, That would be a real mess
 

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I mean . don't get me wrong, there are lots of vining plants that would look good and live on a trellis
I just wouldn't put ivy on MY house. What other people do doesn't bother of affect me
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've seriously considered renting a flamethrower and torching everything in my yard just to get rid of that crap.

Hmmm reading between the lines, this sounds like a "no." :p

I guess the ivy is too muchwith even a trellis behind it? Could see that, it's pretty stubborn stuff.
 

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I have eradicated all of the IVY and Pachysandra in my yard. It took me years. Unfortunately most of my neighbor's lots are overgrown, and once I'm gone, I doubt the next owner will be near as vigilant. Birds continue to spread the seeds too. Might as well give up and plant bamboo, garlic mustard, lesser celandine and multiflora rose before I move.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Might as well give up and plant bamboo, garlic mustard, lesser celandine and multiflora rose before I move.

Doesn't seem to be a whole lot of ivy fans around here.......... :lol:

So not even cascading out of window boxes?? A woman can dream........ :idea:
 

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I've seriously considered renting a flamethrower and torching everything in my yard just to get rid of that crap.

Hmmm reading between the lines, this sounds like a "no." :p

I guess the ivy is too muchwith even a trellis behind it? Could see that, it's pretty stubborn stuff.
will you own the house in 20 years? we put a bunch in the parking strip recently (contained, right?) and I'm waiting for it to take over the entire front yard...
 

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So not even cascading out of window boxes?? A woman can dream........ :idea:
Bougainvillea. Keep it well watered with a bit of fertilizer, and you'll think you're in the south of France. We grew it in planters on our porch in Toronto one year, and it kept going until October. It was spilling all over the place - looked spectacular.
 

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My father has a large windowless wall and has patiently pruned a pear tree to grow up in essentially 2 dimensions with branches that come out horizontally from the trunk. I don't have a picture but there are examples on line. It's a brick house and hasn't caused damage. I'm guessing he planted it when we moved into the house when I was pretty small, maybe around 5, so it's only taken 40 years or so but it's looked pretty good for years, people stop and come ask him about it frequently and it does produce as ass load of pears.
 

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