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Is Jan Ullich's legacy going to be the same as Raymond Poulidor's, "The Eternal Second". Although he won the grand Tour In 97, Ullich's ultimate legacy will be finishing 2nd 5 times, 3rd once, and 4th once. Like Poulidor, (Poulidor's Grand Tour totals being 2nd 3 times and 3rd 5 times), Ullich will go down in cycling history as the beloved second banana behind Armstrong and most probably in 06, Ivan Basso. But like Poulidor whose humanity outshone his physical accomplishments, Ullich will go down as one of the greats for his class act acception of his lack of wins and his supreme talent. Poulidor had Anquetil and Merchx, Ullich had Pantani and Armstrong and both will be remembered as "eternal seconds".
 

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I don't think of him as an eternal second

Let's not forget two World ITT titiles, Olympic Road Gold and Olympic ITT Silver. If you strictly frame it up within the context of the Tdf, perhaps.

I was in Lisbon when he won the 2001 World ITT, beating David Millar. Some controversy about his minute man as well but to all those near him on the pit lane when he was coming to the podium, he was incredibly happy about the victory and you felt the vibe, something noticeably lacking in the four Tdf's I was present at which LA won.

Gregory said:
Is Jan Ullich's legacy going to be the same as Raymond Poulidor's, "The Eternal Second". Although he won the grand Tour In 97, Ullich's ultimate legacy will be finishing 2nd 5 times, 3rd once, and 4th once. Like Poulidor, (Poulidor's Grand Tour totals being 2nd 3 times and 3rd 5 times), Ullich will go down in cycling history as the beloved second banana behind Armstrong and most probably in 06, Ivan Basso. But like Poulidor whose humanity outshone his physical accomplishments, Ullich will go down as one of the greats for his class act acception of his lack of wins and his supreme talent. Poulidor had Anquetil and Merchx, Ullich had Pantani and Armstrong and both will be remembered as "eternal seconds".
 

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funct
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and when he does a Greg Lemond in the last TT of what just could be the nailbiter from hell this July and it becomes 2x winner of the TdF plus sundries, suddenly he doesn't look remotely like Poulidor.

but then he could come second again, give it all up and twenty years from now your synopsis could be close(ish) to the mark.

Still I get the feeling that either way he'll at least get invited to the launch parties, etc that some others don't. He's a class act. So who's to say he doesn't win either way?

ps I still want him to pull his finger out
 

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gastarbeiter
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1. agree with francois - he's still racing

2. forget the pou-pou comparison. he's more of a joep zoetemelk
 

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fmw said:
I think the hall of fame ranks him in the top 20 of all time. Not a bad legacy.
I like the ranking they do at Cycling4all.com better than that Hall of Fame ranking because it assigns points to races considering how important they were at the time the riders were riding and it is broader, taking into account points jersey's etc.

Anyway, it ranks Ullrich as the highest active rider in 24th. For comparison Armstrong ended his career ranked 15th. Other active riders ranked highly: Zabel (30th), Heras (63rd, not sure if this includes last year's Vuelta), Rebellin (66th), Bettini (67th), Simoni (85th), interestingly Boonen still has a long way to go, ranked 345th at the end of last year.
 
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