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This is an epidemic problem. I got doored by a cop once. Luckily I didn't get hurt, just knocked on my ass. He was actually very apologetic, practically insisted that he call a paramedic to check me out.

I just counted myself lucky, shook his hand, and made a joke about remembering my face in case he pulled me over in my car for a moving violation, and continued my ride.

I have been really trying to be on the lookout for car doors, and have taken some steps to TRY to avoid them, though nothing is fool proof.

When I am cycling down a street with a lot of parked cars, if traffic permits, I don't stay all the way to the right, this way I won't get doored. If I absolutely have to ride in the small lane where doors open, I slow down and WATCH very closely as I am passing a line of cars, and try to see inside the cars because you can often tell someone is about to open a door.

I hate to say it, but I think slowing down is one of the most important things I can do when coming up to a line of a bunch of parked cars in a row.

I have also taken to taking very long, painstaking routes sometimes to avoid HUGE avenues with both a lot of traffic and a lot of parked cars, particularly in areas where there are a lot of open stores in the middle of the day and people are parking, jumping out to grab something quick, and often in "too much of a hurry" to be bothered by actually looking before opening a car door.
 

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Why would a cyclist ride that close to a row of cars? I just don't get it. I lived and rode in NYC and NEVER did that. Trust that they're going look? HA!
 

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Why would a cyclist ride that close to a row of cars? I just don't get it. I lived and rode in NYC and NEVER did that. Trust that they're going look? HA!
Sometimes you have to. When cars are flying by, beeping, and trying to pass you, it often feels a lot more dangerous to take the lane or a larger part of it to allow for opening doors. Not an easy quandary. On the one hand, I don't want to get doored and don't have faith in people to look before exiting the driver's side. On the other hand, do I have more faith in the 20 cars flying at me from behind to not hit me while trying to buzz me, or just being in so much of a hurry they ram right into me instead of passing?

Another problem, too, is the ever-increasing problem of road rage. Some of these motorists when they want to pass me and can't get all bent out of shape and agitated because I am either forced to take the lane (due to a double parked car, a bus, or debris in the road) or I need to "share" it with them in many spots. Now my instinct is to say "too bad! I'm doing the best I can out here!" But the problem is that there is a lot of road rage and I don't want to cause any more, even if I am, 100% in the right.
 

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if you're gonna get doored, get doored by a multimillionaire.
 

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Why would a cyclist ride that close to a row of cars? I just don't get it. I lived and rode in NYC and NEVER did that. Trust that they're going look? HA!
I call BS on this... where in NYC did you live and ride?
 

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I call BS on this... where in NYC did you live and ride?
Damn. Ya busted me. Really? I lived on 55th street (east side) for 3 months, moved to 95th and 3rd - there for 4 years. Most of my riding was to and from midtown (worked in 50 rock) or in Central Park in the early morning.

Granted, the Upper East Side is like the suburbs of NYC - I'll give you that. MUCH less chaotic than other parts of the city
 

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^ yup. and watch for taillights and a head above the driver's seat.
 

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Simply ride outside the door zone. It's perfectly legal.
That's not even close to being possible in a traffic-heavy city like NY where I ride all the time. Sometimes you can, maybe even a lot of times on the less busy streets. But most of the time you have traffic flying up on your left, and it is very easy to get hit, and if you start doing that, and motorists feel I am blocking them or slowing them down, that right there is a recipe for road rage and getting buzzed.
 

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It is when you ride faster than 13 mph. :idea:

I mean, at some point you have to evaluate your surroundings and adjust your riding accordingly.
Actually higher speed makes it more dangerous on city streets, because of increased time to stop and decreased reaction time, but that is a whole different topic.

Just being legally in the right isn't enough when you are dealing motorists who all seem to be in a hurry and have no patience for cyclists to begin with/

But hey, if you want to assert your legal right to take that lane or ride far enough away from parked car doors and deal with all the fallout from pissed off motorists who will respond with road rage to you, then God Speed you you, Sir!
 

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Actually higher speed makes it more dangerous on city streets, because of increased time to stop and decreased reaction time, but that is a whole different topic.
Given that the streets were designed to account for its fastest vehicles (cars), increasing your own cycling speed won't have a noticeable detriment on reaction or stopping time.

Just being legally in the right isn't enough when you are dealing motorists who all seem to be in a hurry and have no patience for cyclists to begin with/
Well, it is NYC after all. All major cities are like that, but you've still chosen to reside there and cycle in its streets. I don't understand how you can accept the responsibility and risks of dense city life but not assert your own personal safety.

But hey, if you want to assert your legal right to take that lane or ride far enough away from parked car doors and deal with all the fallout from pissed off motorists who will respond with road rage to you, then God Speed you you, Sir!
You get buzzed more often when you hug the far right side because motorists think they have enough room and try to squeeze past you. This is an easy experiment to replicate, so I invite you to test it. Moreover, read NY statute 1234. While it initially says you have to ride as far to the right side as practicable or on a usable bike lane/shoulder, the statute continues to provide a plethora of exceptions that allow you to control the lane. I exercise lane control whenever I ride in downtown Saratoga or Albany, and I've rarely had problems doing so.
 

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Given that the streets were designed to account for its fastest vehicles (cars), increasing your own cycling speed won't have a noticeable detriment on reaction or stopping time.
I don't agree with this at all. I respect your opinion, but I think this is incorrect. I have also noticed that all the cycling accidents or really bad close calls I have witnessed while on the road involved cyclists who were traveling at or near the motor vehicle speed limit (which is now 25). I have almost never seen an accident with a cyclist who was going at a slower, and I would argue safer speed.

Well, it is NYC after all. All major cities are like that, but you've still chosen to reside there and cycle in its streets. I don't understand how you can accept the responsibility and risks of dense city life but not assert your own personal safety.
I am accepting the responsibility and risks of living in NYC. That's why I cycle slower. I have more reaction time for potholes and doors opening, and by making sure there is plenty of room for motorists to pass me on my left as much as I can (unless I absolutely have to move into the lane for double parked cars, bad road conditions, and such) I have less cars beeping and me and buzzing me. I have noticed an appreciable decrease in angry motorists and verbal conflicts as well as "buzzing" since I started cycling like this.


You get buzzed more often when you hug the far right side because motorists think they have enough room and try to squeeze past you. This is an easy experiment to replicate, so I invite you to test it. Moreover, read NY statute 1234. While it initially says you have to ride as far to the right side as practicable or on a usable bike lane/shoulder, the statute continues to provide a plethora of exceptions that allow you to control the lane. I exercise lane control whenever I ride in downtown Saratoga or Albany, and I've rarely had problems doing so.
I do control the lane when I have to. I am not going to slam into a parked car, slam on my brakes, ride over broken glass, or ride through toad construction. When I need to take the lane, or the right side of the lane, I do.

I also take the part of the statute to heart that says "...as far to the right as is practicable." I find that I can cycle to the right a lot more than I used to believe I could, and this has helped to make my relationships with motorists a lot smoother and more pleasant.
 

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Getting doored sucks. I hope he made it right. Seems like a pretty laid back guy. Not like his character on the show at all.

My wife is a flight attendant and had him as a passenger on a flight. She said he was totally zooted on either pills or weed. He started doing yoga poses in the aisle during the flight. She said he was cool and very polite, although a bit kooky.
 

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Actually higher speed makes it more dangerous on city streets, because of increased time to stop and decreased reaction time, but that is a whole different topic.

Just being legally in the right isn't enough when you are dealing motorists who all seem to be in a hurry and have no patience for cyclists to begin with/

But hey, if you want to assert your legal right to take that lane or ride far enough away from parked car doors and deal with all the fallout from pissed off motorists who will respond with road rage to you, then God Speed you you, Sir!
Not a whole different topic.

The matter seems to revolve more around you doing what you want (riding at a jogging pace on a busy city street) regardless of your surroundings, which I guarantee will piss off more people than a cyclist riding with the flow of traffic.
 

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You get buzzed more often when you hug the far right side because motorists think they have enough room and try to squeeze past you. This is an easy experiment to replicate, so I invite you to test it.
100% correct in my experience. Where I ride, with lots of little half shoulders dotted with rumble strips, the difference between riding 6 inches to the left of the line is night and day from riding 6 inches to the right of the line. 6 inches to the right invites anyone and everyone to pass as if you aren't even there. Doesn't take long for most people to figure it out.

In a busy area or city, I just take the lane seeing as how I'm essentially even with traffic due to slowdowns and the like. Granted, that's faster than 13 mph. :rolleyes:
 
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