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Old Tunnel Road
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why is it that shorts can have fairly long lasting tight leg grippers but jersey elastic hems seem to weaken quickly leading to sagging pockets and collars riding up on the throat?
Or am I missing some brands that adequately address this problem?
 

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Why is it that shorts can have fairly long lasting tight leg grippers but jersey elastic hems seem to weaken quickly leading to sagging pockets and collars riding up on the throat?
Or am I missing some brands that adequately address this problem?
Familiar with the problem! Cheap jerseys aren't cut very well for leaning forward on the bike, hence the collar riding up in front. The elastic on a favorite Pearl Izumi jersey gave way after a year or two and contents sag in pockets.

I've had good luck with Primal in the reasonably priced range. If you want to go first class, Assos are well cut for leaning forward as well as holding up around the waist. They're a close cut, though, not friendly to midriff bulge if you know what I mean.

Good luck!
 

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Old Tunnel Road
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, though Assos will strain the budget. Have some Primals and will pay attention to their abilitiies. I mean even little pull tight toggles like on windbreakers might prove useful.
 

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While for certain it's quality that plays a major role in cycling clothing longevity-which is why you pay extra for the premium brands-there is something you can do to extend the life of your jersey hems.

If you machine dry your jerseys, stop. Heat deteriorates the elastic. Line dry your cycling clothes.

Personally, I have replaced sagging hems in jerseys and I imagine a local tailor could do the same. Basically I leave the existing elastic in place if there's sufficient material below the pockets, and fold over the material around the new elastic. The new elastic is already cut to be snug around the waist, then stitched together to make a loop. It is then pinned in place in 8 equally spaced locations. The hem is then stretched so it lies flat against the new elastic while the elastic is stitched in with a zig-zag stitch.

You could remove the existing elastic first, but as I've found out, it's a lot of work.
 

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While for certain it's quality that plays a major role in cycling clothing longevity-which is why you pay extra for the premium brands-there is something you can do to extend the life of your jersey hems.

If you machine dry your jerseys, stop. Heat deteriorates the elastic. Line dry your cycling clothes.

Personally, I have replaced sagging hems in jerseys and I imagine a local tailor could do the same. Basically I leave the existing elastic in place if there's sufficient material below the pockets, and fold over the material around the new elastic. The new elastic is already cut to be snug around the waist, then stitched together to make a loop. It is then pinned in place in 8 equally spaced locations. The hem is then stretched so it lies flat against the new elastic while the elastic is stitched in with a zig-zag stitch.

You could remove the existing elastic first, but as I've found out, it's a lot of work.
Good info. The seamstress at the local dry cleaner could sew new elastic into an old jersey.

Sweat destroys the elastic. If wet, I take it off and throw it in the kitchen sink, let it soak in cold water with mild laundry detergent, rinse, and hang it up to dry in the shower.

I've also noticed new elastic materials that look more like plastic rather than traditional elastic, as in rubber or latex. Do those hold up better?
 
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