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scruffy nerf herder
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For those of you who have experienced an unexpected job loss... when you started your new job search... what was your relative resume/application output per day/week?

I have officially been out of a job since last friday, and even despite being saddled with a 2 year old since we "cannot afford a babysitter" (which is a crock because we can as I have full severance, plus unused vacation, plus bonus, plus she is working full time now)...

I feel I have been pretty productive on that front.

I have eight resumes sitting at different companies where I actually KNOW people having hiring or strong reference power, I have a lukewarm potential opportunity in April (just dont want to get too optimistic until I have offer in hand), and probably 10 resumes out that are to positions at places where I do not have any personal contacts. I also have started polishing up my LinkedIn and joined several networking organizations. So that is 18 resumes out there... so far.

My wife's father called last night to see how things are going, and this also got my significant other riled up, and she indicated that if I dont find a job soon, she doesn't want me using the fact that I have my daughter as some sort of excuse. WTF. Its only been 4 days in this market... it just seems things are slow to materialize.

Am I underproducing or is she unrealistic?
 

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Genitive Declensioner
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12,146 Posts
funknuggets said:
My wife's father called last night to see how things are going, and this also got my significant other riled up, and she indicated that if I dont find a job soon, she doesn't want me using the fact that I have my daughter as some sort of excuse. WTF. Its only been 4 days in this market... it just seems things are slow to materialize.

Am I underproducing or is she unrealistic?
she is unrealistic...especially given the current job market (lack thereof). A good friend
(stellar resume) just got hired after 7 months of looking. I think a good job offer in anything less than 3-4 months is very very good right now....
 

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Back from the dead
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20,626 Posts
That's totally unrealistic. Even companies that have openings are waiting to see how the economy does in the near term. It's a really tough market overall, and your local market could be even worse.

funknuggets said:
My wife's father called last night to see how things are going, and this also got my significant other riled up
Wait a minute. You have a wife and a significant other? How does that work?
 

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Hermia commutes
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1,496 Posts
I would say that calls from the in-laws to "check in" are not productive at this point. I'm sure your wife is freaked out by the situation and having visions of you turning into some terrible sitcom in a wifebeater and 6-day stubble. I'd maybe sit down and set some ground rules for your unemployment. You'll keep her posted, make reasonable efforts, etc, and she'll keep her panic-induced nagging to herself. Also, do you guys have a plan for what happens to the 2 year old if you get called for an interview?

It seems like a conversation about everyone's expectations and roles is in order here.
 

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Shirtcocker
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60,639 Posts
funknuggets said:
Am I underproducing or is she unrealistic?
I think my last job search took about 6 months and that was in a much better market.
 

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Bacon!
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9,190 Posts
She better expect "months" and not days in this market unless you've got the ability to fill a niche that few people can. If I were you I would be sending my resume to every possible thing that comes up. I was unemployed in the last mini recession (due to my own dumb choices) and it took almost six months to find something. I don't know what it's like in your area but around here, unless you know someone, it could take most of a year to find something unless something happens to fall your way.
 

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Registered
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183 Posts
9 months and counting for me out of work (I am in the investment field, so may never find work!). Agree with all the others - she is WAY out of line, likely stressed out, pressure from her family, etc. Sounds like you have better than average leads out of the gate. I hope she calms down.
 

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Premium Member
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10,106 Posts
funknuggets said:
Am I underproducing or is she unrealistic?
She probably is scared. I am no pollyanna when it comes to assessing the current state of the economy. It sucks. But, I am hearing all kinds of extreme doom and gloom from people who should know better and will not be starving even if the world economy is plunged into a depression that lasts for several years. My guess is that she does not want to say directly what is bothering her, but that what you are hearing is a byproduct of her fears. This is a stressful time for both of you. Try to keep your cool and when you have to blow off steam, the Lounge is always open. :thumbsup:
 

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p != b
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Like everybody else said, unrealistic. My wife (although currently employed) has been looking off and on for more than a year, looking pretty seriously for the past four months, and nothing yet.
 

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Collin's Dad
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1,858 Posts
I think it's either TerryB or LenJ that usually says "your job is now finding a job"....but it sounds like she's just nevous and probably isn't her intent to hound you about the job search. Seems to me that you are doing pretty good so far getting out resumes, etc...
 

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Stumpcake!
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5,950 Posts
MarkS said:
She probably is scared. I am no pollyanna when it comes to assessing the current state of the economy. It sucks. But, I am hearing all kinds of extreme doom and gloom from people who should know better and will not be starving even if the world economy is plunged into a depression that lasts for several years. My guess is that she does not want to say directly what is bothering her, but that what you are hearing is a byproduct of her fears. This is a stressful time for both of you. Try to keep your cool and when you have to blow off steam, the Lounge is always open. :thumbsup:
I was thinking the exact same thing. Like Mark said, I think she is probably pretty wigged out about it. Just keep at the job search and blow off steam here or on the bike. If you engage in this kind of disagreement no one wins. Let it go and talk to her calmly about the situation. Work it through that way.

Or get her raging drunk and tell her to STFU, HTFU, etc. Seriously....don't do that. I'm just being silly.
 

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Windrider (Stubborn)
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A job search is 1,000 no's followed by a yes.........the faster you can get the no's out of the way the quicker you can get to a yes.

My job search rules of thumbs:

1.) Never start sending stuff out and making calls in the first couple of weeks......that is the panic approach. Rather, spend that time, sharpening your tools......putting together a killer resume, purging the resentment, anger and hate, lining up references, negotiating final seperation both financially & emotionally, from my previous employer, putting together a core group of people that I trust implicitly to advise me and support me thru muy search, putting together a budget with my wife to allay the fear...showing her the timetable, pulling together a list of every contact I can think of that might know someone that might know of an opening, researching companies in the geography or industry that I want to target with my network calls etc, etc.......basicially, building my battle plan.
2.) Respond to known openings from networking with cover letter & resume = approx 2 to 5 per day....sourced from network groups, execunet and similar high end sites.
3.) Make 7 to 15 calls per day to network contacts.
4.) From calls, set up 3 to 7 network meetings....coffee, lunch, quick get together etc.
5.) Have 2 to 4, 1/2 hour to hour network meetings per day.
6.) From each meeting, garner 2 to 4 additional network contacts & ability to use the persons name as the entre'
7.) Try to help one other person per week in their job search. It's a tough lonely process, I don't want to go thru it alone...no one else should either.

A job search is about building momentum......things you do in week one don't pay off until week 8 to 10....the more you do, the more momuentum you build up.

A job search should be a full time job. Your job is to get a job. Anything less is going to show itself as a longer time to placement.

A job search is about effort at the right things.

A job search is an effort to be positive about yourself and your ability to contribute at a time when the very foundation of that is being attacked. Do whatever you can do to feel good about yourself. Working a good process and trusting the process is a good way to do that.

IMO

Len

PM if you want another "Advisor" I've been thru the professional job search thing 3 times....at very high level jobs. There is a process that works.
 

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eminence grease
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An excellent primer on how to do it.

Question though - you come at this from a career in consulting where I imagine you have built a long list of business acquaintences that would form a decent network. What would you recommend for people on the other side, people who have been inside a company for a long time ini jobs that lack all that external interaction?

Take me for example, I've been in here for almost 20 years, in a real nichey kind of job yet one with requirements that could be broadly applicable (startups, mgmt, Chinese, tech). I have an extensive network, on the inside, which of course would be of no use in some sort of RIF scenario. Or if I just wanted to quit.

The thing I'm finding different these days (yes, I am looking) is that the entire recruiting business seems to be more centered on the corporations looking for people than on people looking for corporations. In the golden days of semiconductors, I used to pick up the phone, call a headhunter and I could have a job lined up in weeks. Now, despite the incredible informational power of the net, recruiters seem to be more angling towards corporate business (judging from the sites I've looked at) than in finding people to fill the openings they are representing.

How do you think people might connect with jobs without someone representing them and without a network to give them leads?
 

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Registered
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Unrealistic. In that matter I'm lucky with my girlfriend she wouldn't ever say something like that so rough (that's what it sounded to me).
 

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Seat's not level
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19,372 Posts
A whole week and you haven't found a job. Man, what a slacker :D :blush2:

Both your wife and SO are out of line, especially in this economy.

FIL, needs to STFU unless he has contacts or a job for you. Prying is just going to set off the wife and/or SO again.

Cherish the time with your daughter...a little 1 on 1 time every day with her will put a smile on your face. Smiles are important when you get an interview.
 

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More cowbell!
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I've heard (and experienced) that a good rule of thumb is 1 month between jobs for every 10K in annual salary.

If babysitting is in the budget, it would allow you to focus on your new job.
 

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It's not TOO Cold!
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2,498 Posts
My spouse and in-laws were always wondering when I was going to get a job (took 2 years). I did work part time at Home Depot for a year, that slowed down the pestering. I would spend about 40 hours a week chasing leads and searching the internet for possible fits. My problem is, with my degree and experience most positions were in the rust belt of Houston, I didn't want to go there. Perserverance does pay off.
 

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Seat's not level
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Cyclo-phile said:
I've heard (and experienced) that a good rule of thumb is 1 month between jobs for every 10K in annual salary.

If babysitting is in the budget, it would allow you to focus on your new job.
Ah, come on, a cryin baby in the background while on a phone inteview is always a plus. :thumbsup:
 

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Windrider (Stubborn)
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22,021 Posts
terry b said:
An excellent primer on how to do it.

Question though - you come at this from a career in consulting where I imagine you have built a long list of business acquaintences that would form a decent network. What would you recommend for people on the other side, people who have been inside a company for a long time ini jobs that lack all that external interaction?

Take me for example, I've been in here for almost 20 years, in a real nichey kind of job yet one with requirements that could be broadly applicable (startups, mgmt, Chinese, tech). I have an extensive network, on the inside, which of course would be of no use in some sort of RIF scenario. Or if I just wanted to quit.

The thing I'm finding different these days (yes, I am looking) is that the entire recruiting business seems to be more centered on the corporations looking for people than on people looking for corporations. In the golden days of semiconductors, I used to pick up the phone, call a headhunter and I could have a job lined up in weeks. Now, despite the incredible informational power of the net, recruiters seem to be more angling towards corporate business (judging from the sites I've looked at) than in finding people to fill the openings they are representing.

How do you think people might connect with jobs without someone representing them and without a network to give them leads?
Here is my process & I think it applies to your questions.

1.) Make a list of everyone you know.....everyone you have in your Outlook contact list, bot professional & personal. Include anyone that you've interacted with. DON'T edit it down because the person can't help you.

The very exercise of putting this list together will be very theraputic.

2.) Now do 2 ratings on each person (0 to 5 scale)

first rating is a combination of how well they know you and how positivly they think of you....in other words would they be an asset or a liability to your search.

second rating is How strong do you think THEIR professional network is.

3.) Add the 2 ratings together and sort the list by the total of the 2 ratings. You have now created your network contact priority list.

4.) Don't screen out people in the company you are leaving unless you are leaving under a very dark cloud..........most people are more than happy to help you (People know that more likely than not they will need help at some point). (Obviously the process is slightly different for someone who is looking while still employed vs someone who has already been RIF'd or left). My rule is, when in doubt.....leave someone on the list. You never get the order you never ask for.

The higher the job in an organization, the more likely that it will be handled by a retained recruiter....one of the goals of your network meetings is to get positivly introduced personally to any retained recruiters...especially one's that specialize in your industry or function.

The other goal of the network calls and meeting is to help people help you (which most want to do) by having them give you part of their network to contact. I always try to get 3 names I can contact using them as an intro. Think about the math here.......if you do 3 network meetings a day, and get 3 contacts each, even if you start your own network list with 50 people on it (& you will have much more than that), before too long you will have more people to contact than time......that's what I meant by building momentum.

Hope that helps.

len
 
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