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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
No...I'm not really serious about that title. I'm currently in Base 3 and venting a little.

It's not easy to do this much volume during the winter. Let's see, yesterday I cummuted to work and then extending my ride by two hours on the way home. All of this was done below freezing and mostly in the dark. When I got home I ate and got on the rollers for another 30 minutes to spin. Oh yeah, then I did some core strength exercises for 30 minutes.

It's Friday morning and I've already up 13 hours of exercise for the week. Today, I'll rest by doing just one hour. Saturday includes a 3+ hour team training ride and sunday will be two hours on the MTB. This doesn't include some time on the rollers and more strength stuff.

Just to make things a little more difficult, I'm paying close attention to my intake in order to drop a few pounds. After reading a very enlightening book, I'm averaging 60:20:20 (carbs:fat: protein) for the last 6 weeks.

Now, for the good news. I'm already lighter than I've been in the last two years. Down from my holiday peak of 164 to my current 153. BF% had gone from 12% to 8%. My LAT is near where it peaked last year in August. I'm ready to tear up the road in the build phase!

Bring on Spring!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

"The greatest motivation to train is knowing that your competition isn't" :D
 

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What race category are you and what did you pick as your yearly training goal?

I'm trying to follow Friel's stuff for the first time this year. I'm just a Cat 5 (raced a bit last year but didn't really get too into it) but I have the time and I know I can handle it so I picked 500hrs as my training goal. I live in MA, I think I start Base 3 in 2 weeks. It's my 5th season cycling seriously but I haven't followed a dilligent training plan before. We still are having pretty cold weather but I'm managing to get my outdoor stuff in.

I am counting my weight workouts as 1hr towards the weekly figures, I work full time but so far it hasn't seemed like it's going to be ridiculous to make the hourly goals. I believe my longest week is in Base 3 and is around 14 hours. If I get in good hours on both saturday and sunday I don't think I'm going to have too much trouble with needing a ton of time during the week. Once daylight savings hits I know it will be easy.

It has been working great for me too, I have managed to keep my knees really healthy, got my squat up almost 50lbs from last year, and I'm almost 10lbs lighter than last year. I'm psyched for the season as well, I think I'm going to do quite well based on how I did last year.

I'm guessing you are at a higher level than I am and are doing higher training volume, but I also feel like I have been doing an awful lot of slogging through bad weather outside due to the training plan.

Ben
 

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Roadies Rejoice
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Damn Ben, I though I was having a decent winter, but then I read your post. I'm out most days but generally don't have much more that 90 minutes on a weekday. On weekends I always seem to run out of time short of a three hour ride, although that's what I have planned for tomorrow.

How are you doing your testing re BF% and LAT? Also I assume your 60-20-20 is %, no?

Steve
 

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Doing CTS here

I am enjoying the scructure training and find their approach works better for me.

But all the trainer time is making me bitter- the nicer weather better get here soon I can let loose a nice attack soon. Hopefully all this training will have a payoff in an unpleasant surprise for some people in the springs first group rides/races.

Coolhand
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Answers...

To BeninMA,
I'm a recent upgrade to Cat. 3. I pulled some strings and went against the judgement of some sandbagging teammates. I have a little self-doubt about how competative I'll be in the 3's. I've been busting butt to make sure I don't make a fool of myself. I've got something to prove to myself and I wouldn't mind shutting the mouths of a few others.

Last year I did 550 hours so this year I planned for 600. That calls for 13.5, 14.5, and 15.5 hours in the Base 3 weeks. I'm currently in Base3, Week 2. I've been going over the hours in most weeks except the rest week. Keep in mind that some of my time is off the bike. For instance, this week I've done an hour of running and two hours of strength. In the end, I'm doing Friel's hours on the bike and added a couple extra by cross-training.

It's my second year using Friel's plan. Last year's Base phase turned into a bust due to the weather. I was frustated all week because I couldn't get out enough. Then, on the weekends, I tried to make up for lost time and it didn't happen. I'm planning better this year.

Steve,
My commute is 1.5 hours round trip. I've been doing that 4 days a week. That really helps. There is no way I could do this volume without commuting. This way I don't have to spend much time on the trainer, which I really dread. The running is just cross-training. The core strength exercises are used to strenghten a weak lower back which is a habitual problem if I slack off.

I have a scale that does BF%. It's a knock-off of the Tanita scales. It's been very consistant for me and I just use it to record trends.

I use a Friel test to figure my LAT.
From his book:
"T3e CP30, Speed
BT: Long warm-up. Then ride a 30 minute time trial all out. Race effort. Use a flat, out and back course. 10 minutes into the time trial punch the lap button on your heart rate monitor. Afterwards, record your average heart rate for the last 20 minutes. Also record distance covered or average speed."

My average heart rate for the last 20 minutes is an estimate of my LATHR. I noticed last year that this number always slightly higher than my avg. HR in my MTB races. This year, I plan to use this info during the MTB races.

Lastly, yes...the 60:20:20 I refered to was %. I'd prefer to see the fat % go down but most of my high protein choices include fat. I'm still experimenting with different foods.

I'm glad to read that you are getting out and riding. We have to hook up again when the weather becomes more bearable.

Biknben
 

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biknben said:
I'm glad to read that you are getting out and riding. We have to hook up again when the weather becomes more bearable.

Biknben
Ben;

Sounds good to me, but I'm going to have to kick my training up a notch to hang with you! Anyway, this winter I've met by chance while out riding a few guys (who also don't know how to read a thermometer) who live real close to me and would probably join us on one of your loops. Good riders, nice bikes.

Steve
 

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Sounds very similar

I think my training sounds very similar to yours bikenben. I have a 50 min commute twice a day, 4 days a week, and without that I wouldn't be able to get the hours/miles in. I play football (soccer!) twice a week - I consider it useful cross training but also just helps me not go insane with life, cycling, the universe and everything! Soccer ends at the end of march then it's race season and all hell breaks loose on the intervals!
 

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Base 3 is the toughest for volume.

Just wait `till build, the intensity ramps up, you will beg for a 3hr easy ride!
 

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Yah...

We had mid 40s on saturday, I got out for 4 hours.

Then yesterday it was in the teens and the plan said go out again. I suffered through 2 hours, probably should have done more... it sucks doing that in the cold though. It's really miserable.

Hopefully the real big hours we'll have some decent weather.

Ben
 

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I'm becomming a disbeliever....

Second race of the season yesterday and results werent great. Im not really worried about it due to the fact that Im in the first week of build, and was sick last week and also had some rear dr malfunctions due to a last minute wheel switch... but I didnt have the legs to be competitive anyway.

Nonetheless, it got me thinking about Friel and how he has structured his training around the science, and not the real world practicality of racing. Friel and Carmicheal seem to purposely keep you out of shape for minimal gains in your peak. So when you ride group rides and early season races, you likely get cracked.. .and that probably has some serious adverse psychological effects. Number one, if you get cracked, you will probably have all sorts of excuses in your pocket (see above). Number two, bonking and getting dropped by the pack often will make you think you arent in as good as shape as Friel tells you that you are or will be. Three, as other riders get faster due to earlier season power, and more early season race efforts... they get faster as you inch along. So when you come out in May in your "peak" form.. .and still get whacked... you have to figure out...did you fail Friel, did Friel fail you, or do you just suck.... It happened to me last year... and so I thought that maybe I didnt adhere to the plan close enough... but then I sat down with a guy on my team that is a USCF licensed coach and we just discussed the relative weaknesses of Friel and it started to become clear. It seems that there is more benefit in every week racing in increasing form through race efforts, than these baby steps that seem to only give you a marginal increase in power in performance. Kind of like... would you rather perform at 95% of your ability consistently, or would you chose to perform at significantly below for most of the season and put out 100% once or twice a season. The percentage gain seems like it is not really worth the effort....you know?

How many other people have found that the Friel plan dissentigrates when it comes to the busy part of the race season? Just curious.
 

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some guys I know

The science may not fit everyone.

There are some racers around here that flat out kick butt, and how do they train? They simply go out and ride hard, really hard, several times a week. They are pure hell to ride with, because if they are feeling good, they put the hurt on. I think their attitude is "forget all that namby pamby science stuff -- I get faster by riding hard. Period." Their easy rides are merely easy because they have destroyed themselves the day before. If they could ride harder, they would.

No heart rate monitors, books, video tapes, cadence computers, training logs, etc. Just lots of hard riding.

I think this is a "make me or break me" strategy. These guys get injuries, but not necessarily more than others. That's their "off-season", then. Otherwise, there is none.

For whatever reason, it really does work for some. Can't deny the results.





funknuggets said:
Second race of the season yesterday and results werent great. Im not really worried about it due to the fact that Im in the first week of build, and was sick last week and also had some rear dr malfunctions due to a last minute wheel switch... but I didnt have the legs to be competitive anyway.

Nonetheless, it got me thinking about Friel and how he has structured his training around the science, and not the real world practicality of racing. Friel and Carmicheal seem to purposely keep you out of shape for minimal gains in your peak. So when you ride group rides and early season races, you likely get cracked.. .and that probably has some serious adverse psychological effects. Number one, if you get cracked, you will probably have all sorts of excuses in your pocket (see above). Number two, bonking and getting dropped by the pack often will make you think you arent in as good as shape as Friel tells you that you are or will be. Three, as other riders get faster due to earlier season power, and more early season race efforts... they get faster as you inch along. So when you come out in May in your "peak" form.. .and still get whacked... you have to figure out...did you fail Friel, did Friel fail you, or do you just suck.... It happened to me last year... and so I thought that maybe I didnt adhere to the plan close enough... but then I sat down with a guy on my team that is a USCF licensed coach and we just discussed the relative weaknesses of Friel and it started to become clear. It seems that there is more benefit in every week racing in increasing form through race efforts, than these baby steps that seem to only give you a marginal increase in power in performance. Kind of like... would you rather perform at 95% of your ability consistently, or would you chose to perform at significantly below for most of the season and put out 100% once or twice a season. The percentage gain seems like it is not really worth the effort....you know?

How many other people have found that the Friel plan dissentigrates when it comes to the busy part of the race season? Just curious.
 

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Agreed.

DougSloan said:
The science may not fit everyone.

There are some racers around here that flat out kick butt, and how do they train? They simply go out and ride hard, really hard, several times a week. They are pure hell to ride with, because if they are feeling good, they put the hurt on. I think their attitude is "forget all that namby pamby science stuff -- I get faster by riding hard. Period." Their easy rides are merely easy because they have destroyed themselves the day before. If they could ride harder, they would.

No heart rate monitors, books, video tapes, cadence computers, training logs, etc. Just lots of hard riding.

I think this is a "make me or break me" strategy. These guys get injuries, but not necessarily more than others. That's their "off-season", then. Otherwise, there is none.

For whatever reason, it really does work for some. Can't deny the results.
You've just described the training routine of the strongest riders I know.
 

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That is the

Mercx training plan. There are few pro/1/2/3 racers I know that follow this routine. There are some, however, they are very rare on my team.

Also rare is the full bore Friel routine. 99% of us fall in between somewhere. The 1s and 2s on my team simply ride incredible amounts. There is lots of reason to their rhyme though. Others base their days routine somewhat around their resting heart rate numbers in the morning after they've determined their level of "restedness".
 

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I don't know about a static "plan" per se.

I'd like to think that you've got a training plan that's based on work with a coach/doctor that's checked you out, seen you ride, know your results, where you're trying to get, etc.

More "personal".
 

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Periodization does work, though perhaps not the Friel or Crawford version. It works in studies and for world class athletes. Studies with control groups can detect small differences and world class athletes are so close that small differences can be the difference between 1st and 2nd place.

But for most amateur athletes, they aren't highly trained enough that periodization would really benefit them. Their time would be better spent improving their baseline fitness because improvements come more rapidly at the lower levels. You can peak all you want but if your baseline fitness is low, the results will not be all that impressive.
 
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