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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just finished Jobst Brandt's book for the 2nd time. He recommends swaged spokes (double butted) because they can be brought up to a higher tension and have less chance of losing tension because they stretch in the tensioning process.

In my wheelbuilding history, i have built (my first set of wheels) with 32 3x DT swiss revolutions. Never really knew any better than using it all around. Road these velocity escapes with tiagra hubs for a whole CX race season without ever having a problem until i actually dented the rim beyond repair... rebuilt with same spokes and Major tom. No noted problems.

Built up 3 new sets for CX with DT Revs front and NDS, and Comps NDS (after doing reading recommending NDS heavier spoke).

Now I am building a carbon road set (that will be dual purposed in the fall for CX). The set will be used for TT/CRIT/CIRCUIT/RR over the summer. I was planning on the Revolution front Rev/Comp rear (24 2x/28 2x).

What is the 'flexiness' that people are referring to with the revolutions? Shouldn't they all operate very similarly once brought up to tension? For windup, I just mark the lateral most side of the spoke with a sharpie while I am building them up. I'd like the wheels to feel good and solid in crit's/circuit races.

I am doing a 38mm set for my wife (135#), 50mm set for myself (195#).

Thoughts?
 

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Because the spoke has an effectively lower cross section, an applied load will cause more deflection (or 'strain') than a spoke with a larger cross section. Therefor a wheel built with revolutions will theoretically have more lateral and rotational deflection than one built to similar tension with comps or champs. Whether you notice is another question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Because the spoke has an effectively lower cross section, an applied load will cause more deflection (or 'strain') than a spoke with a larger cross section. Therefor a wheel built with revolutions will theoretically have more lateral and rotational deflection than one built to similar tension with comps or champs. Whether you notice is another question.

That was some of my question. Sometimes I feel like people stress/exaggerate some of the 'theory' that they understand into a feeling that they get in reality. My thought was that was a 50mm wheel with 24/28 lacing should be plenty stiff, but I don't want to go through the whole process and be afraid to dive the wheels into a corner.

The wheels that I am coming off of were Bontragers (43mm) 16 spoke. Raced them without any real problems, but could definitely get them to rub when I stood up on short power climbes, or if i really leaned the bike to one side when riding in a straight line (could get it to scrub the brake pad). I am thinking nearly any wheel (deeper and more spokes) should be stiffer than these, which I sold because I was convinced 16 spokes had a limited lifespan with me on them.
 

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I lace my low depth rims (24 to 28mm) with Race or Force, 28f/32r or 32/32. My carbon are 45mm deep and are laced 24f/28r with CxRays.
I am heavier than you and these combos are fine so I dont believe you need to be concerned about diving into a corner with a similar setup at your weight. I should also say that I use hubs and lacing patterns that help to assure the most laterally stiff wheels I can.
 

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I have a set of Roval Rapide CLX40 wheels on my Roubaix that use these spokes.
Roval Rapide CLX40

•Rim Profile: Aero
•Rim Material: carbon fiber
•Rim Construction: molded
•Braking Surface: carbon fiber
•Brake Track Height: 9mm
•Rim Depth: 40mm
•Rim Width: 16.2mm, internal; 23mm, external
•Front Spoke Pattern: radial
•Rear Spoke Pattern: radial/2-cross (2:1)
•Spoke Count: 18 front, 24 rear
•Spoke Type: DT Revolution, butted, straight pull
•Nipple Type: DT spherical alloy
•Front Hub: Roval, sealed ceramic cartridge, carbon/alloy shell
•Rear Hub: Roval, wCNC machined alloy body, sealed ceramic cartridge, DT Swiss 240 internals and ratchet system cassette
•QR: Roval Cr-Mo
•Assembly Method: hand-built
•Total Wheelset Weight: 1,396g

When I first got the bike the brakes were adjusted really close and I could hear them rub the brakes when up out of the saddle pushing hard. The brakes are a bit looser now (more of a "normal" clearance) and I dont have that. I'm ~ 170#. As you can see from the specs, they are 18f/24r on 40mm CF rims.

I like the wheels. They have a really nice ride. I also have a set of Mavic Ksyrium Elites on another bike. Good durable wheels, but really thick stiff spokes. No defection and a bit harsh riding.

Not sure this helps, but thought I'd share my limited exp with them.
 

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Madcow
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Flexy is about perspective. Given two identical wheels, will a DT Comp version be stiffer than a revolution version? Yes. But does that mean that the revolution version will be flexy, not necessarily. It depends on the rider, rim, hub, spoke count etc... There is definitely more to consider than just the model of spoke you choose.

I think it's also important to point out that you rarely hear that DT Aerolite or Sapim CxRay spokes are "flexy" and both of those are equal to the DT Revolution.
 
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