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The truth is that the faulty designed head tube on Treks require a high spacer stack. It's also over 50 grams heavier than advertised.
 

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Henry Chinaski said:
KB is pretty conservative when it comes to safety/failure, and his top $$$ lightweight fork has an AL steerer. I guess Trek's lawyers could have hand in this, too... Still, interesting. (I won't ride a fork unless it's steel :D ).

http://www.bontrager.com/Road/Components/Forks/5758.php

edit--dang, is this the wrong forum? :confused:
How many times has a fork failed because of a carbon steerer? I've heard of the steerer crushing when the stem is over-tightened but that's not when riding. Forks have failed where the steerer meets the fork crown but that happens with aluminum steerers too.
I'd rather have a true one piece carbon fork where the steerer/crown is a continous piece of carbon instead of trying to mate two different materials
 

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Faulty

Not sure it's faulty but Trek does deliberately have low standover and allow a lower front end than, say, a Colnago.
 

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As an interesting observation concerning carbon steer tubes crushing when clamping the stem... I had a perfect chance to test the strength of the carbon steerer on my new Time Edge build. After I cut the fork I put the piece of steerer tube I cut off the fork into my vise. It took a cheater bar on the vise handle to crush the the tube so the sides touched each other. But when I released the vise, the tube sprang out to an oval shape (closer to a full circle than crushed). There was no catastophic failure of the tube and even now with the deformed piece one cannot use hand pressure to change its shape. There is no stem that I can think of that would crush or even damage the carbon steer tube of this fork! Just an observation.... and I have to agree that I would be more careful around the bonded edge of the aluminum and carbon than the full carbon fork as stated before.
 

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Does KB actually design these bits anymore?

I lusted after Bontrager's Race Lite MTB frames back when he made them in Santa Cruz. But after Trek bought him out, his name just seems to be a rubber stamp they put on Taiwanese bits that don't get the Icon badge. I've lost my wood for this stuff.

Kestrel's Evoke fork has an aluminum steerer, and they go about $100 wholesale. They were supposed to be cutting edge in carbon design, but I wonder now.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sablotny said:
I lusted after Bontrager's Race Lite MTB frames back when he made them in Santa Cruz. But after Trek bought him out, his name just seems to be a rubber stamp they put on Taiwanese bits that don't get the Icon badge. I've lost my wood for this stuff.

Kestrel's Evoke fork has an aluminum steerer, and they go about $100 wholesale. They were supposed to be cutting edge in carbon design, but I wonder now.
I think he's pretty involved.

http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=tech/2004/features/bontrager
 

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Good article

Tho' hard to say..."I do some design, some engineering and some mentoring of engineers with less hands on experience." If he would have said "I spec'd my top line fork with an aluminum steerer because I didn't want to sacrifice stiffness when sprinting" or something, my ears would perk up. But with Trek's deep pockets, I could easily see them giving him a salary to use his name and be associated with the company, even if it was mostly for ride-testing prototypes and such. He seems to be a big fan of carbon wheels, even off road, so its strange that he would have an aversion to carbon steerers.
 

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In my experiences with several bikes, carbon steerer tubes are hard to keep quiet. If you sweat on the stem/fork like I do :(, corrosion sets up inside the spacers/stem/fork junctions which leads to creak and click noises after only a few of weeks riding. With an aluminum steerer, you can slather grease all over the steerer where the spacers run and things have a better chance to stay quiet.
 

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Henry Chinaski said:
KB is pretty conservative when it comes to safety/failure, and his top $$$ lightweight fork has an AL steerer. I guess Trek's lawyers could have hand in this, too... Still, interesting. (I won't ride a fork unless it's steel :D ).

http://www.bontrager.com/Road/Components/Forks/5758.php

edit--dang, is this the wrong forum? :confused:
part of it, I'm sure, is that Lance is wary of carbon steerers.
 

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Maybe he feels that there is just no "real" need for them. Many "Pro" bikes are at or under the weight limit already.
 

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Unfortately you now need to take most stuff KB says with a grain of salt. I remember him railing about certain product types, only to come out with his own version the next year. Meh. House brand parts priced like innovative competitors IHMO- pass.
 
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