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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which is better. I'm a 225lb 72" male who rides abour 50-75 miles per week. Occasionally more. Which is better? Pros and cons? I dont race, I just ride for the love of riding. I have been using kevlar bead but i now need new tires and am wanting to know what the consensus is and what yall think would be best. I'm Tired of wandering aimlessly through bike shops buying stuff. I am trying to learn more and be more specific on what i buy... Not just what i can afford at the time. Thanks in advance any help.:blush2: :thumbsup:
 

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Thank you, Dave, for answering this one, so I don't have to. Perhaps he was referring to wire-bead tires?

Just a thought.
 

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Same difference

twitch1 said:
Which is better. I'm a 225lb 72" male who rides abour 50-75 miles per week. Occasionally more. Which is better? Pros and cons? I dont race, I just ride for the love of riding. I have been using kevlar bead but i now need new tires and am wanting to know what the consensus is and what yall think would be best. I'm Tired of wandering aimlessly through bike shops buying stuff. I am trying to learn more and be more specific on what i buy... Not just what i can afford at the time.
As noted, it is the Kevlar bead that allows a tire to be a folder (wire bead tires are the stiff ones that can't be folded), so it's not clear what your question is. However, there are so may other factors in tire design that this should not be your decider. At your weight, definitely consider 25 mm or even 28 mm tires if they will fit your frame. After that, considerations like flat resistance come into play and may drive your choice if you live in an area where punctures are a serious issue. Otherwise, look for tires on sale and get ones in color that you like at your price point.
 

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Perhaps you are confusing wire beads with folding/kevlar beads. Wire bead tires are generally heavier and less expensive than folding ones. And, of course, they don't fold. Kevlar/folding bead tires are lighter, usually more expensive and can be folded.

Personally I only buy folding bead tires because they are lighter and the roads are very hilly where I ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok... Thanks all to the reply. I was just misunderstanding what the "difference" was. I thought they were two different types instead of both being folding tires. I understand now. I was refering to kevlar not wire. On price point some said kevlar and some said folding so i was under the understanding that it was 2 different types. Is a kevlar bead better than i guess a "regular" folding tire? If that makes sense. And i run a 700x23 tire and havent had any problems with that size yet. You think a bigger one would be better for me? Whats flat resistance? Sorry if these sound like silly questions but ive just gone with what was on the bike already. I got the bike second hand from a guy i used to ride with. I've obviously never learned much about what I need as far as parts go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
And if it helps your answers my wheels are Rolf Vector Comps. A nice red color with black and yellow writing. haha:wink:
 

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A kevlar bead IS a regular folding bead, so there's no benefit there either way. Some marketing guys just like to point out that it's made from Kevlar, because Kevlar sounds cool. "Folding bead" doesn't have the appeal that "kevlar" has, but when it comes down to bicycle tires, they're synonyms.

25mm tires should be more comfortable and should last longer, especially given your weight. Larger tire = load distributed on a larger surface = larger contact patch = more traction and less wear.

And my answer to the third question "what's flat resistance" is well... just how a tire resists to punctures (flats). Some racing tires are very soft and weak. Sure they perform, but you will have a flat as soon as you hit pointy rocks, splinters, thorns and whatnot. Tires that have a thicker thread and/or some form of protection under the thread (kevlar or vectran layer, etc.) will be much less prone to flats i.e. they are flat resistant.

That should cover all the questions you adressed in your post :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the schooling... I guess ive been thinking regular tires are the ones without kevlar. Yall have been very helpful. I'm going to go buy new tires now... I love this site. Thanks again.
 

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I second the recommendation on 700 x 25 tires. I am gradually switching all my tires to 25s (or larger) as my 23s wear out. They ride much better and last longer with little weight penalty.

One other thing to point out. Many tires also have kevlar belts in the treads to help prevent flats. This is a good thing. The kevlar belts increase puncture resistance without adding much if any weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
what tires have the kevlar belt? Cuz i cant seem to ride without getting a flat most of the time. I just pulled my bike out to change the pedals and i have a freakin flat. I think my wife is letting the air outta my tires or i have a small small small leak, cuz i cant seem to find it.
 

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Andrea138 said:
There are some nice 25c Conti tires on Bonktown right now if you're quick...
Blue or yellow though. :rolleyes: Not for me.
 

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twitch1 said:
what tires have the kevlar belt? Cuz i cant seem to ride without getting a flat most of the time. I just pulled my bike out to change the pedals and i have a freakin flat. I think my wife is letting the air outta my tires or i have a small small small leak, cuz i cant seem to find it.
this is a problem that regularly gets beaten to death on this forum. you can replace tubes 'til you're blue in the face, but unless you find the cause you're throwing money away. put air in the punctured tube and locate the hole, then check the tire at that location (which is easy to find because you put the lable on the tire sidewall where the valve comes thru the rim) and remove the offending object. then you can replace the tube.
 
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