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ChrisMBianchi said:
and I need help with some terms.

Whats a Fred?

And the term PIE?

Fred has multiple meanings but kinda revolves around a cyclists with questionable knowledge and/or skills riding on a: a bike well above their needs or b: dressed in a kit (cycling clothes, usually coordinated as in team wear) they haven't earned (only an issue with a small group of folks as many persons will support their favorite teams by wearing their kits... it's only an issue during sanctioned events (yeah, like somebody would mistaken me for Rashaan Bahati) or c: a person who talks like Cliff Claven from Cheers, an expert about nothing at all.

Dunno PIE... wonder if it's like PITA?
 

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Pie! doesn't mean anything...or it means everything. :D

Note the threads it appears in and I'm thinking you'll get the meaning. Kind of an internet thread killer--means to change the subject.

e.g.

Newbie1: Who is Lance's girlfriend these days?

Another poster: I like PIE!

Yet another poster: PIE! is delicious...\

etc. etc.
 

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Fred and poser/poseur

Akirasho said:
Fred has multiple meanings but kinda revolves around a cyclists with questionable knowledge and/or skills riding on a: a bike well above their needs or b: dressed in a kit (cycling clothes, usually coordinated as in team wear) they haven't earned (only an issue with a small group of folks as many persons will support their favorite teams by wearing their kits... it's only an issue during sanctioned events (yeah, like somebody would mistaken me for Rashaan Bahati) or c: a person who talks like Cliff Claven from Cheers, an expert about nothing at all.
Your a and b definitions are more like poser/poseur than Fred. Fred is more about unskilled, clueless, etc. though sometimes it is used as a dig at those who shun "the latest" equipment and are proud of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So is it OK to wear a team discovery jersey to a club ride? I bought mine to help with Livestrong and feel proud to be part of that seeing as my Mom and Grandmother are survivors. I dont wear any other team gear just that one. My Oscar the grouch jersey is by far my favorite.
 

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If you see a guy riding down the street with no helmet, a tee shirt, baggy shorts, tennis shoes, and white knee socks with burgundy strips around the tops - you've found yourself a fred.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
Your a and b definitions are more like poser/poseur than Fred. Fred is more about unskilled, clueless, etc. though sometimes it is used as a dig at those who shun "the latest" equipment and are proud of it.
I always thought of those "shunners" as simply being retro... a kind of endearing term (I've got a bud who rides his retro fixed gear, Fuji Del Rey like a metronome).

I kinda see Fred and Poseur in the same light (you shoulda seen me at my last TT... full aero bike... ultra aero wheels... aero lid... and a party keg instead of a six pack).:cryin:
 

· Call me a Fred
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Kerry Irons said:
I think you've found yourself a 3X DUI case and a suspended license. :)
Except for the socks, that's what I ride around town wearing. I have a feeling that my neighbors think that I must not have a valid license as they never see me drive a motorized vehicle.
 

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jsedlak said:
Do you guys actually call people this?
... yes, because we're petty judgemental bastids...

Seriously, by nature, humans are tribal and tend to label their surroundings... While it might not be politically correct, it does have a certain dividend. If a new rider shows up on your training ride, an ongoing assessment of his/her bike handling skills and demeanor can save shedding skin on pavement later. If said rider showed up in the middle of a paceline on their aerobars and even at that, they're squirming all over the bike (and road) just to keep up, then you'd not only call them a few names... you'd prolly avoid riding with them again (or at least for a looooong time).
 

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Akirasho said:
... yes, because we're petty judgemental bastids...

Seriously, by nature, humans are tribal and tend to label their surroundings... While it might not be politically correct, it does have a certain dividend. If a new rider shows up on your training ride, an ongoing assessment of his/her bike handling skills and demeanor can save shedding skin on pavement later. If said rider showed up in the middle of a paceline on their aerobars and even at that, they're squirming all over the bike (and road) just to keep up, then you'd not only call them a few names... you'd prolly avoid riding with them again (or at least for a looooong time).
Right, but take me for example. I am by no means a noob, but at the same time am no where near a veteran. I ride a 25+ year old bike that is nothing like the new bikes, ride it quite often and trying to become a better rider. I am planning on spending a large sum of money on a new bike. Does this mean I am a "Fred" because I am riding a bike that is above my current needs?

Let's put it this way, if I were to show up to one of your rides with a brand new $3600 bike and had some troubles knowing what to do in a pack situation what would you do?

a) Stay clear of me, while being rude by making jokes to other riders or to me
b) Tell me what I am doing wrong so I can fix it, and then see if I do

Fact is a new rider can't learn unless someone takes the time to teach them. Having said that, I have never been taught anything about my bike. Like skiing, I am mostly self taught, learning by watching others and seeing what feels right and what doesn't. Thus the way I ride may be completely "wrong" in certain situations and I rather you tell me than to scoff at me.
 

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jsedlak said:
Right, but take me for example. I am by no means a noob, but at the same time am no where near a veteran. I ride a 25+ year old bike that is nothing like the new bikes, ride it quite often and trying to become a better rider. I am planning on spending a large sum of money on a new bike. Does this mean I am a "Fred" because I am riding a bike that is above my current needs?

Let's put it this way, if I were to show up to one of your rides with a brand new $3600 bike and had some troubles knowing what to do in a pack situation what would you do?

a) Stay clear of me, while being rude by making jokes to other riders or to me
b) Tell me what I am doing wrong so I can fix it, and then see if I do

Fact is a new rider can't learn unless someone takes the time to teach them. Having said that, I have never been taught anything about my bike. Like skiing, I am mostly self taught, learning by watching others and seeing what feels right and what doesn't. Thus the way I ride may be completely "wrong" in certain situations and I rather you tell me than to scoff at me.
In a perfect world, there would be no derogatory terms for anyone/anything... but as I said above, that's just not human nature. But, as you've pointed out, that's not a definitive excuse either.

As with most things human... familiarity breeds familiarity. There can be a pecking order/heirarchy in cycling (not always, but often) and you kinda have to "earn" your way in. Sometimes it can be by reputation... or who you know... or by deeds, but likewise, I don't wanna imply that all cyclists (especially roadies) are elitists snobs who shun outsiders. There can sometimes be a fine line 'tween informing an noob and insulting an experienced rider who simply went in a different direction today (occasionally, I hop aboard my Bianchi Milano with sneakers and baggy shorts but still sound like a roadie if you talked to me... I'd come off as a know it all on a cafe bike).

While I still stick by my definitions and the "right" to move beyond political correctness, I rarely use the term except when... earned. I'm more of an "innocent until proven guilty" or "remain silent and be thought the fool rather than open your mouth" kinda guy. That said, you can satisfy all of the riders some of the time... some of the riders all of the time... well, you get my drift.
 

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Akirasho said:
In a perfect world, there would be no derogatory terms for anyone/anything... but as I said above, that's just not human nature. But, as you've pointed out, that's not a definitive excuse either.

As with most things human... familiarity breeds familiarity. There can be a pecking order/heirarchy in cycling (not always, but often) and you kinda have to "earn" your way in. Sometimes it can be by reputation... or who you know... or by deeds, but likewise, I don't wanna imply that all cyclists (especially roadies) are elitists snobs who shun outsiders. There can sometimes be a fine line 'tween informing an noob and insulting an experienced rider who simply went in a different direction today (occasionally, I hop aboard my Bianchi Milano with sneakers and baggy shorts but still sound like a roadie if you talked to me... I'd come off as a know it all on a cafe bike).

While I still stick by my definitions and the "right" to move beyond political correctness, I rarely use the term except when... earned. I'm more of an "innocent until proven guilty" or "remain silent and be thought the fool rather than open your mouth" kinda guy. That said, you can satisfy all of the riders some of the time... some of the riders all of the time... well, you get my drift.
I can certainly understand the pecking order. When I got my car and joined up with a few people around the area I was most definately at the bottom. It took me 6 months of working for one of the guys in his shop on these cars just to be recognized as someone who wasn't just another dumb kid driving a "fast" car. (My car isn't fast by any means.)

So I can understand all of that, but I hope that you (and others reading this) can understand that not all of us have the background or the group of friends to be able to gain admittance into such a culture. That some of us need one or two of the people higher up on the order to welcome us and take a chance. I can understand getting angry/scared/etc if we are told and taught but do not learn. But I just can't understand anyone's want to put another down, in anyway, simply because they are not in the know or not in the group.

Just because it is human nature doesn't mean everyone has to engage in it. I encourage you to take the time and help out an inexperienced person (cycling or not) next time and welcome them in. Not only do you help spread the culture and community, you get a lot back. Trust me.
 

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Just because it is human nature doesn't mean everyone has to engage in it. I encourage you to take the time and help out an inexperienced person (cycling or not) next time and welcome them in. Not only do you help spread the culture and community, you get a lot back. Trust me.
... agreed...

Still, I've paid a few dues... and even as such, I have the sense that when I'm out of my area (tribe) there's that little undercurrent running... nature of the beast (and to a degree, male dominated sporting/social events in general).

I guess the last thing I would say on the matter, and again, not trying to justify "bad" behavior would borrow from Grandma and the song New York, New York...

What doesn't kill ya makes ya stronger and...

If I can make it there I'd make it anywhere...

Hopefully most of us will have a thick enuff skin to get through the "initiation" and to the point where you're comfortable enuff with yourself and such that any undercurrents (or terminology) don't matter.
 
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