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Matnlely Dregaend
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I did my 1500 mile service on the bike today, usually at this point I swap in a new or used chain, but I hung up the old and new KMC X10SL chains next to each other and there appears to be very little wear, less than 1/16" across the entire length of the chain. Should I keep riding this chain for another 1500 before I swap in the new one? That would mean 6000 miles per chain. I'm somewhat concerned about cassette wear because I do have DA Ti cogs...

New gold chain on left, old chain on right.

 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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5,046 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I usually swap in the new chain, then 3000 miles later put on the old chain for another 1500. That way I get 3000 miles out of a chain. I only ask because usually my chains stretch more than this.
 

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Yeah, I am pretty impressed with KMC products at this point also.

You will likely hear that there is no need to replace a chain that is not worn (and I would agree). However, it sort of depends on how you are measuring wear.

The number of miles on a chain are somewhat meaningless (especially if you stop and think how variably people use their bikes...a heavy sprinter, vs a lightweight rec rider). I may have a training block where I am putting a lot of stress on a chain AND weather conditions/ride length wear a chain quickly, while other times I am "taking a break" and racking up easy miles doing a charity ride or something in prime weather conditions.
 

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advice...

That amount of elongation is about normal. I've got a cheaper DX10SC with 2000 on it that is only elongated about 1/16" over the full length.

The problem is that elongation does not tell the full story on wear. The rollers wear and mine have increased form the original .210 distance between them to about .225 inch.

Ti cogs may not last even half as long as steel, particularly if you use those Ti cogs a lot. The smart thing to do is buy a new chain and put it into service, but don't toss the old one. Use the new chain for 1500 miles and then install another new one. If you don't get chain skip in any cog after 3,000 miles, then you can use the third chain for the next 1500, then start reusing the old ones. With luck, you might get 9,000 from those three chains and one cassette. If you have all steel cogs, then you can get quite a bit more life.
 
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