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Lets Go Hokies!!!
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I have a slight tear in my right meniscus that I don't feel like getting fixed (its workmans comp, so its not my dime, I just don't feel like it right now). The only time it really bothers me is when I'm doing squats at the gym. I was wondering if I am using an improper form, or if its just gonna happen? If so, does anyone have any suggestions on something else I can do instead of the squats? Unweighted squats aren't bad, but they're not great. Thanks!
 

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Scary Teddy Bear
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HokieRider said:
I have a slight tear in my right meniscus that I don't feel like getting fixed (its workmans comp, so its not my dime, I just don't feel like it right now). The only time it really bothers me is when I'm doing squats at the gym. I was wondering if I am using an improper form, or if its just gonna happen? If so, does anyone have any suggestions on something else I can do instead of the squats? Unweighted squats aren't bad, but they're not great. Thanks!

As a browns fan, I SHOULDN'T tell you anything, but if you have a small tear of your meniscus, it will likely go away on it's own, but it will also likely hurt whenever your knee is in flexion and an axial load is applied. SLR or terminal quad extensions may be helpful for quad strengthening, and reverse curls, isolating the hamstrings may be more comfortable for you.
 

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grippy...
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different injury, but...

physasst said:
As a browns fan, I SHOULDN'T tell you anything, but if you have a small tear of your meniscus, it will likely go away on it's own, but it will also likely hurt whenever your knee is in flexion and an axial load is applied. SLR or terminal quad extensions may be helpful for quad strengthening, and reverse curls, isolating the hamstrings may be more comfortable for you.
The mantra i heard in PT was to be sure not to flex the knee past 90 degrees, particularly with a load. My rehab began with exercises (like squats, curls, etc) at higher angle limits, eventually working my way to that 90 degree limit.
 

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Deadlifts.

They work much the same muscles, you can control the bend in your knee by varying the width of your feet, and you'll strengthen a lot of other important muscle groups.

Des
 

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um, yeah, take a break from squatting. I would not do deadlifts in lieu of squatting myself although deadlifts are a great exercise.

Is your form OK?

1. Do NOT use the pad on the bar for the back of your neck. The prime indicator of someone who is clueless on how to squat is people using the pad. The bar will fit on your back in a 'sweet spot' further down toward the top of your back (but not on your neck). ]

2. Make sure your knees do not go over your toes when you are in the squat motion. You want your a$$ to stick out backward and your knees should never go over your toes whenst squatting down. (the same goes for leg pressing & hack squatting too - keep your toes at the top of the platform (if not a little over).

3. Although going down parallel is great for developing total leg size & strength, it is not that necessary for cycling. When riding, your leg is never near a 90 degree bend. You can do an 'athletic' squat and not go down to parallel. This is a little easier on your knees & something that I do in recovery from a knee scope and an overuse injury. If you want to work on your hamstrings and glutes, you can get on a leg press sled - go lighter - 2-3 plates per side (or 1 if you're a little guy) and then go down deep - til your legs hit your chest. Keeping light here is key to not jack your knees. Then you don't have to push up all the way - just up 'til past 90 degrees working the bottom range of motion.

4. Do not put 2.5 lb plates down on the floor and stand on them (heels) when squatting. This is supposed to isolate your quats - but it's plain stupid and dangerous. This causes people to lean forward too much. If you want to isolate your quads, do front squats and/or hacks.

5. The best lifting knee advice I have is to never do leg extensions. They are totally useless to an athlete and cyclist pending you're doing other leg exercises (squatting, hacking, and leg pressing). Leg extensions will F your knees up pretty badly. I was doing sets of 100 w/ 170 lbs (yes you read that correctly) back when I was into lifting a lot and one of my knees is still pissed off from that winter.
 

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Scary Teddy Bear
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Okay..

The Carlster said:
um, yeah, take a break from squatting. I would not do deadlifts in lieu of squatting myself although deadlifts are a great exercise.

Is your form OK?

1. Do NOT use the pad on the bar for the back of your neck. The prime indicator of someone who is clueless on how to squat is people using the pad. The bar will fit on your back in a 'sweet spot' further down toward the top of your back (but not on your neck). ]

2. Make sure your knees do not go over your toes when you are in the squat motion. You want your a$$ to stick out backward and your knees should never go over your toes whenst squatting down. (the same goes for leg pressing & hack squatting too - keep your toes at the top of the platform (if not a little over).

3. Although going down parallel is great for developing total leg size & strength, it is not that necessary for cycling. When riding, your leg is never near a 90 degree bend. You can do an 'athletic' squat and not go down to parallel. This is a little easier on your knees & something that I do in recovery from a knee scope and an overuse injury. If you want to work on your hamstrings and glutes, you can get on a leg press sled - go lighter - 2-3 plates per side (or 1 if you're a little guy) and then go down deep - til your legs hit your chest. Keeping light here is key to not jack your knees. Then you don't have to push up all the way - just up 'til past 90 degrees working the bottom range of motion.

4. Do not put 2.5 lb plates down on the floor and stand on them (heels) when squatting. This is supposed to isolate your quats - but it's plain stupid and dangerous. This causes people to lean forward too much. If you want to isolate your quads, do front squats and/or hacks.

5. The best lifting knee advice I have is to never do leg extensions. They are totally useless to an athlete and cyclist pending you're doing other leg exercises (squatting, hacking, and leg pressing). Leg extensions will F your knees up pretty badly. I was doing sets of 100 w/ 170 lbs (yes you read that correctly) back when I was into lifting a lot and one of my knees is still pissed off from that winter.
If you have a torn meniscus, DO NOT DO ANY AXIAL WEIGHT LOADING onto the affected knee, especially when combined with torsional forces, you run a HIGH risk of extending the meniscal tear into a complex tear that may require surgery and will lay you up longer. THIS INCLUDES DEADLIFTS. I would personally, only do light spinning in an easy gear until this resolves. Hamstring curls will be okay, as well as terminal leg extensions. The above is correct in that full leg extensions like the type the football players in high school were always trying to max out on do very little, but doing LIGHT weights and focusing on the last 20 degrees or so of extension will strengthen your quads. We use it extensively in rehabbing knee injuries, patellofemoral disorders, and after total knee replacements. I am trying to give you good sound orthopedic advice, you can either heed it or not, the choice is yours.
 
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