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I'm starting to get into Cyclism Sundays on OLN. Like any other cyclist, I like to have some reference between the speeds and distances the pros are riding compared to me. Makes it fun to watch. Seems like the European races are the gold standard of bike racing, and of course everything is measured using the metric system. I know it's not a difficult conversion, but what's the point? I think even some American races use kilometers(?)

My question is: why don't we set our computers to KPH and be done with it?
 

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Still On Steel
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Tried it. Didn't like it.

Jack1576 said:
My question is: why don't we set our computers to KPH and be done with it?
I tried this once, briefly, for sorta-kinda the reasons you detail. I'm not a racer and never have been, but I watch all the races I can on the tube, and at some point it occured to me that as long as I kept track of my speed and distance using any consistent system (miles, kilometers, furlongs, cables, whatever), it really didn't matter which system I used. So I set my cyclocomputer to metric and amazed myself at how much "faster" and "farther" I was suddenly able to ride.

But I soon found the situation akin to when I studied German in high school. I got to the point I could speak the language fairly well, but I still did all my "internal" speaking (i.e., thinking) in English. And so it was on the bike. Whenever I'd look down at my computer, I'd instantly have to do the conversion in my head for the readout to be fully meaningful. Miles were just too deeply ingrained to set aside. So I put the computer back the way it was and that was that.
 

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I am currently spending this whole year riding under the KM measurement. I guess being an accountant, the math part just comes pretty easy. A good Saturday ride will give me a metric century, or 62 miles. Did 152KM on Sunday of this past week.

I like the KM measurement. It makes for some big numbers. Speed is always fun. We were pegged out last night on my clubs "A" ride, on a flat stretch, at 50 kmh. Felt pretty good, wasn't redlining, but staying tucked in.

For reference, I recently heard that Mario Cippolini had a top sprint of 74KMH at his prime. That's 45.88mph by my count. That, my friend, is moving.
 

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But no matter the measurement you use, your velocity is just the same. ;)

We use KM here in Canada, so I have no conversions to make. :)

When I lived in the UK I had to remember that all distances and speeds on the roads are measured in miles. That took getting used to, but it wasn't a difficult transition at all. I just remembered that 30mph was close to 50kmh, and that 70mph on the motorway was much faster than I was allowed to drive in British Columbia!
 

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Funny how even in running in the US, most "citizen" event races are 10K or 15K or whatever... same with skiing.

I recently moved to europe- I struggle mostly with temperature- and my height and weight in metric. Kilometers isn't that big of a deal- although it is strange that our car in only in km. It was strange at first, thinking everything was so far awy when reading distance road signs.

Jack1576 said:
I'm starting to get into Cyclism Sundays on OLN. Like any other cyclist, I like to have some reference between the speeds and distances the pros are riding compared to me. Makes it fun to watch. Seems like the European races are the gold standard of bike racing, and of course everything is measured using the metric system. I know it's not a difficult conversion, but what's the point? I think even some American races use kilometers(?)

My question is: why don't we set our computers to KPH and be done with it?
 

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If you think in kilometers, set your bike computer to kilometers. If you think in miles, ....................................
 

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filtersweep said:
...I recently moved to europe- I struggle mostly with temperature- ...
Fast (and dirty :wink5: ) conversion formula. Double the Celsius temperature and add 32. It will actually give you a higher Fahrenheit figure, but it will be close. Or you can do what I did when I studied in Austria (way too) many years ago. Don't even try to convert to your old references. :rolleyes:
 

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Temperature conversions

PomPilot said:
Fast (and dirty :wink5: ) conversion formula. Double the Celsius temperature and add 32. It will actually give you a higher Fahrenheit figure, but it will be close. Or you can do what I did when I studied in Austria (way too) many years ago. Don't even try to convert to your old references. :rolleyes:
I just try to remember a few conversion points and the conditions associated with them.

0C = 32F = freezing (barely)
5C = 41F = pretty chilly cycling weather
10C = 50F = cool spring day
20C = 68F = room temp or a nice not-too-warm day
30C = 86F = pretty hot = perfect cycling weather (IMO)
35C = 95F = pretty darn hot
40C = 104F = way hot
 

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filtersweep said:
I recently moved to europe- I struggle mostly with temperature- and my height and weight in metric. Kilometers isn't that big of a deal- although it is strange that our car in only in km. It was strange at first, thinking everything was so far awy when reading distance road signs.
When I moved to Europe from good old metric Canada, I just had to choose the one E.U. country that isn't totally metric -- Britain.

But at least their weather reports are in celsius.
 

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You are one sick puppy- all I need to know is between 5 and 10C- the temp seems to be in this zone all year. 10 is starting to feel warm.

JCavilia said:
I just try to remember a few conversion points and the conditions associated with them.

0C = 32F = freezing (barely)
5C = 41F = pretty chilly cycling weather
10C = 50F = cool spring day
20C = 68F = room temp or a nice not-too-warm day
30C = 86F = pretty hot = perfect cycling weather (IMO)
35C = 95F = pretty darn hot
40C = 104F = way hot
 

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I often tell my friends that I rode a double century over the weekend, but don't mention that it was a metric double. :) :thumbsup:
 

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Is this as simple as I think it is? If in km/h, multiply by 0.6, you can pretty much do it in your head, i.e. 35 km/h = 21 mph. If you can't do that in your head, I dunno....

Shortcut for C to F, double it and add 30, this works for most typical temps. If that isn't close enough, F = 9/5C + 32. So take the C temp, round up or down to nearest multiple of 5, then the math is easy, you can do it in your head. Add a degree up or down to compensate for the rounding. Close enough?
 

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I started using metric last April for a Brevet. The queue sheets were in km. Been riding that way ever since. I do admit that I find myself converting a lot on the bike though. There is a bike trail near me that is 6.25 miles long (real real close to 10,0km), so for distance I think in multiples of that bike trail.

I don't switch back because when I think about it, "miles" make no sense in relation to any other measurement (quick, how many inches in a quarter mile)
 
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