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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am contemplating going with rollers...I hate the stationary trainer....is there a big difference between the Alloy and Challenger models (other than $$) ?? Any other recommendations, such as Dyno-Lyte? Your opinion is appreciated.

Merci'
 

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******* said:
I am contemplating going with rollers...I hate the stationary trainer....is there a big difference between the Alloy and Challenger models (other than $$) ?? Any other recommendations, such as Dyno-Lyte? Your opinion is appreciated.

Merci'
I have the original PVC ones and they've held up great, so I think it's probably just a money, coolness factor thing. Can't help you on the diameter issue.
 

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Poly-Lytes

I have the poly-lytes. They are nice. I can spin in a small gear and do a recovery ride, or put it in the big ring and get a tough workout. It's the right balance for a rider like me. I ride seriously, but I don't race. I like rollers better than trainers in general. I have to work on my spin, and concentrating on my form seems to make time go faster. It's less boring!

Coot!
 

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I also can't tolerate the trainer. I use mine like 1% of the time for warming up before races and sprint work that I can't do on rollers.

A good set of rollers feels like riding on the road. There's not a huge difference between the alloy and challengers but I've heard of the Challengers's endcaps cracking during shipping. You'll have this set of rollers for life so the extra $$$ might be worth it. Get the fan unit for sure.
 

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Ditto the Poly-Lytes

I have owned a set of the Poly-Lytes for about four years and they have held up like new. They have endured two moves, one of them overseas, and show no signs of wear. While the metal end caps will probably hold up better, it would be over such a long time that I couldn't justify the increased price for recreational use.

I also asked about drum size advantages/disadvantages and the advice I received was spot-on for my riding style. As a strictly recreational/fitness rider (not competitive) the larger drum size is more stable yet still allows me to get a good workout. The smaller drums do not maintain their rotational energy as long requiring even greater effort and they also require more control to stay one. As I was new to rollers when I purchased them, I was already nervous enough about being able to ride them, without going to something even more difficult.

Hope this helps.

John G
 

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Poly-lytes here too.

I like them--a good range and smooth operation. No appreciable wear on the end caps in a couple of seasons.
 

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1 more Poly-Lyte owner

This is my first off season with rollers. I felt I needed another option to the trainer and figured these should fit the bill when I wanted to mix things up.

They're super smooth and I now wonder how I got through previous winters without them. I'm no roller pro but these things are great. The learning curve wasn't bad at all as I started to feel comfortable on them after just a couple of half hour sessions. I'm not doing sprint workouts on them but I feel comfortable enough to do just about anything else on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys, the feedback by all is great......I'm in the same boat as John G......just ride for recreation, exercise and enjoyment, but do want to increase my performance and I'll opt for the big rollers.
 
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