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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't stop, but have to pace myself. Visited all three Home Depots within 10 miles of the house yesterday alone, bringing home a carload of flowers.

Planted some Montauk daisies alternating with some seedum x (Autumn fire) and tall purple things that the bumblebees love. Then a bit of scrawny, lanky yellow wildflower things and some "big burly" yellow flowers. Also some dark purple bushy things with blue flowers. Also mums lining the front path. My entire body is sore from digging.

Most of you guys seem to have vegetable gardens; anybody have experience with perrenial wildflower stuff? I didn't realize until this morning that Montauk daisies can grow into big shrubs. :blush2: Kept the tags, but don't remember the names of everything offhand. Basically trying to alternate the seasons and colors. Backyard gets plenty of sun while the front is very shady (I fear for the mums.)
 

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Seat's not level
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Wasn't there a manscaping thread last week? Lots of 'scaping' going on around these parts.
 

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Meow!
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Girchy and I planted a bunch of perrenials earlier in this summer to supplement some that the previous owners had already established. I'm a newbie at this myself, so there's been a lot of trial and error. Some things have flourished better than others. The dry conditions we've had of late haven't helped, and I'm really sick of watering. We mixed in some annuals for dependable color, and they've started to look really sickly for lack of rain.

Let us know how the mums do. I read up on them a bit yesterday and decided to forego planting them for fear that they wouldn't have enough time to establish themselves before winter. Most of what I read recommended trying to plant them earlier in the year--although they're harder to find--and to look for hybrids that are known to be hardy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My mother had a yard full of mums bordering the pool when we were growing up. They proliferated like crazy, but in retrospect they were in a sunny location. Guess I'm naïve in thinking that if Home Depot is selling them, it must be the season to plant them. :rolleyes:
At least they're kinda cheap! I included some purple asters with the mums, so we'll see if they fare any better/worse (or are they really the same thing?? I dunno.)

Maybe the heat wave we've had this summer will extend the planting season? One can hope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There might even be more than three. I only hit the ones I know about. Technically, the one in Union Square is w/in 10 miles (I think), but I'm not driving into NYC for that. I think you can double the # of them for every additional 10 miles you're willing to travel :p
 

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Find a good regional flower gardening book. That will get you in the ballpark with regard to seasons and light requirements. As for the size of things, there are bazillions of varieties of some plants so the only way to know how big a particular variety will get or how it will behave is from the tag or some online resource. You can also check out www.gardenweb.com - in particular the gardenweb forums.

(I'm just a veggie grower.)
 

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Zaphod Beeblebrox
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The town I grew up in now has a Home Depot, Lowe's, and Menards all within not much more than a stone's throw between them all. I fail to understand.


Perennials are nice because you don't have to keep replanting them but generally they bloom once a year so you need more careful planning to have color from early spring all the way up to frost. Mums are what I would consider a tender perennial, after a hard frost I'd cut them back and mulch them heavy then uncover in the spring and hope for the best. There might be enough time for a mum planted now to establish itself but I wouldn't count on it being there in the spring. Best thing you could do is to stop shopping at big box garden centers and find a small nursery that has a knowlegeable staff that knows your (micro)climate and can help plan accordingly.
 

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Plants that grow in such a fashion can generally be divided up. Move the divisions to other areas, trade with neighbors or give them away.
We divided up some daisies on Monday and planted them in other locations in our gardens, keeping a 1/4 sized piece in its' original location.
 

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Moderatus Puisne
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I raked

this weekend, since the trees are starting to lose their leaves (already!)

Took me about 20 minutes.

I love my 1800 ft^2 lot!

The rain has started, though, and the vegetable garden is threatening to overwhelm the small space. Next year the little strip of grass will probably go away and be replaced with more garden space. The butternut squash and cucumbers take all kinds of space.

I kind of hate grass. I mean, meadows and prairies are cool, but in front of houses, meh.
 

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Argentius said:
I kind of hate grass. I mean, meadows and prairies are cool, but in front of houses, meh.
I'm with you on this. I already tore up pretty decent sized "patches" of lawn to put in gardens. One was a 25 x 35 ft patch, one was 20 x 25 ft, and the other two will happen next spring. The lawn just looks like poop(we don't water because I'd rather save the water for the fishies) in the late summer. Plus, it will add a nice curbside garden I don't have yet.:thumbsup:
 

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Frog Whisperer
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Argentius said:
I RAKEDthis weekend, since the trees are starting to lose their leaves (already!)

Took me about 20 minutes.

I love my 1800 ft^2 lot!
Hush yo mouf........

I am seriously thinking about buying a bagger for my new mower to NOT spend 20 hours raking leaves again!
 

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....

1. Throw it on the ground.
2. Water it a lot.
3. Leave what I like.
4. Pull out what I don't.

I occasionally remind the neighbors that as long as I live next to them, their place will look terrific.

Within 10 miles of my place, a dozen Home Depots and Lowe's.
Because they know that when my lawnmower runs out of gas, it's time for a new lawnmower.
 

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DLMKA said:
The town I grew up in now has a Home Depot, Lowe's, and Menards all within not much more than a stone's throw between them all. I fail to understand.


Perennials are nice because you don't have to keep replanting them but generally they bloom once a year so you need more careful planning to have color from early spring all the way up to frost. Mums are what I would consider a tender perennial, after a hard frost I'd cut them back and mulch them heavy then uncover in the spring and hope for the best. There might be enough time for a mum planted now to establish itself but I wouldn't count on it being there in the spring. Best thing you could do is to stop shopping at big box garden centers and find a small nursery that has a knowlegeable staff that knows your (micro)climate and can help plan accordingly.
Trying to have something in bloom throughtout the entire season is a real art. The house in which I live came with perennial gardens. Some of the plants have died over the psst 17 years, but we usually have something in bloom. If I had to start from scratch, I don't know if I would be able to replicate what we have. If you are serious about perennnials, you need to consult with someone who is local and can give you a combination of plants that will bloom at different times.

Although a local nursery (if one exists in your area) is a good source for knowledge, I would not stop shopping at big box stores. Some of the best things I have planted in the past 17 years have come from Home Depot and similar places. You have to know what you are looking at, but I have found some unusual and healthy plants at Home Depot at a fraction of the price that they would have cost at the local high end nursery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Pleased to learn that the tall purple things (anise hyssop) are edible! Fun watching the bees go to town on them. They do smell nice too. I didn't realize they were in the mint family, and grow as such- yikes! John was warning me about mint, how it takes over. Need to take some of the landlord's mint, but grow it in an outdoor container.

Also looked up the scraggly yellow wildflowers- coreopsis I believe. Seem like troopers. Love the wildflower look. Hoping the seedum xs will turn pink soon. The other yellow flowers I got are nicknamed "Big Burly," need to read up on those.

As for the mums, they're cheap enough, will manage if they don't come back. Sucks that the front yard is so shady near the house, but sunny near the sidewalk. But I think there are some colorful shade-tolerant plants that'll manage.

Gotta plant something noticeable against the mostly-sunny back fence. The yellow trumpet vines looked cute, but somebody complained in a review that they take over big-time. Something besides hydrangeas, which seem so common.......although I need something besides summer-autumn bloomers. Maybe lilac?
 
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