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08 Madone 5.2 Rider
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Whilst busy picking out the shoes/pedals/etc. at the LBS, I got a better idea of the bike fit they will do for me when I pick up the 5.2.

I am supposed to show up with all my gear and allot about 2 hours for a final fit and adjustment. The description sounds pretty good and it appears that I will get a decent fit from the LBS.

Rock on....:thumbsup:

dave
 

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Yup. Bring your shoes, shorts/bibs, jersey, gloves, helmet, socks, waterbottle, saddlebag with gear. If you have your own saddle bring that too.

They will fit you, adjust saddle, install your cleats, adjust handlebars. They most likely will not cut the steerer until you have had some time in the saddle.

Then take it out on the road (reason for helmet, gloves, water bottle and saddlebag) and stretch it out for a few miles. It is one thing to spin on the trainer, it is another to take it out on the road, run up and down through the gears, hammer on the flats/hills, bunny hop it, ride no hands, make sure there are no rattles etc.

One thing to ask when you bring it back for its first adjustment (or do it yourself if you are so inclined) is to shorten up the cables. They usually come long from the factory with lots of play and end up slapping the frame and generally making alot of noise on bumpy roads.

Have fun, ride safe, but RIDE
zac

PS. Trek is now spec'ing KMC missing links on Shimano road bike chains. Ask your dealer how to use them ie remove/reinstall. They are reusable and are bidirectional, so you really cant screw it up. The odd thing is, is that they are really hard to find here in the US.

Before you leave the store: If you don't already have them, get some spare tubes, a mini patch kit, tire boot (The Park TB-2 is awesome), inflator of your choice and a floor pump, tire irons, and a small multitool. Your don't need a chain removal tool. Water bottles. FWIW, the Bontrager RaceLite cages are color matched to the Madones, they hold bottles well and last pretty good.

Also some chain cleaner (the Park stuff is real good), chain lube, and a small bottle of Tri-flow (for brakes and derailleurs)
 

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Zac -
With all due respect, I have to disagree with your last bit on shortening up the cables. While its not uncommon to tweak the cables at some point, I would recommend riding the bike for a few hundred miles then bring it in for some adjustments if need be. My cables were fine right out of the box, didn't rattle, didn't make any noise and didn't slap the frame. The LBS did tighten them up a bit at the 300 mile range, but thats normal as new cables will tend to stretch with initial use. Let him ride it a little, then see if anything needs adjusting. No need to open a can of worms before he steps out the door with it.
Only my 2 cents for whatever its worth.
 

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08Madone5.2 said:
Zac -
With all due respect, I have to disagree with your last bit on shortening up the cables. While its not uncommon to tweak the cables at some point, I would recommend riding the bike for a few hundred miles then bring it in for some adjustments if need be. My cables were fine right out of the box, didn't rattle, didn't make any noise and didn't slap the frame. The LBS did tighten them up a bit at the 300 mile range, but thats normal as new cables will tend to stretch with initial use. Let him ride it a little, then see if anything needs adjusting. No need to open a can of worms before he steps out the door with it.
Only my 2 cents for whatever its worth.
Yeah that is why I said at the first adjustment, which is usually after a month or so of riding. (I should have been a bit more clear on that)
I guess it is just a peeve of mine. I take about 6" off the cables right out of the box. I like 'em tight, goes back many years.

Just that I hear a lot of complaints about slapping noises and it is often attributed to the cables flapping in the wind. Simplest solution is just to shorten the cables.
 

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zac said:
Yeah that is why I said at the first adjustment, which is usually after a month or so of riding. (I should have been a bit more clear on that)
I guess it is just a peeve of mine. I take about 6" off the cables right out of the box. I like 'em tight, goes back many years.

Just that I hear a lot of complaints about slapping noises and it is often attributed to the cables flapping in the wind. Simplest solution is just to shorten the cables.
Zac -
I stand corrected, I didn't see that you said "at the first adjustment." 6" off the cables seems like alot though.
 

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6" give or take. That is just me. Can't wait for the D/A 7900 with hidden cables.

In another thread you guys seem to ride in VT. I have a home up there and ride frequently in the Northern part of the state.

There are alot of riders, and Vermont has a bed and breakfast system that caters to bike tourers. Have you ever done the six gaps? Bolton access road? Jay Peak? Equinox when it is open? And the two big climbs: Ascutney and Burke toll road? They are great climbs some even require special gearing. Those are all the well known ones. I have a couple more that are awesome (not all on pavement though) with views that are just spectacular...like 122 south from Glover to Wheelock with 6 miles of uninterrupted highspeed downhill on good pavement...woohoo...!
 

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08 Madone 5.2 Rider
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
"They will fit you, adjust saddle, install your cleats, adjust handlebars. They most likely will not cut the steerer until you have had some time in the saddle."

Hmmm....cut the steerer? I have no clue what that refers to...:confused:

I like the fact that they will take that much time to fit a new owner. They even said to take about 15 minutes clipping in and out just to get used to it.


dave
 

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I got fit on my bike last night and it took a little over two hours. They did a lot of measuring and adjusting while we discussed how I like to ride and how fit I am. Adjusted some more, flipped the stem, talked saddles, practiced clipping, pedaling, and so on and so forth. The ride got better with each adjustment made too.

Also, I asked them to go over some of the more basic stuff like changing flats, etc and they were happy to show me. If this is your first bike, don't be afraid to just talk and ask questions. The more they know you and understand how you ride, the better the fit.
 

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dave_gt said:
"They will fit you, adjust saddle, install your cleats, adjust handlebars. They most likely will not cut the steerer until you have had some time in the saddle."

Hmmm....cut the steerer? I have no clue what that refers to...:confused:

I like the fact that they will take that much time to fit a new owner. They even said to take about 15 minutes clipping in and out just to get used to it.


dave
Dave don't worry about cutting the steerer.

Part of your fitting involves saddle height and fore/aft placement. The LBS will probably adjust so that the saddle position is neutral with your knees in the KOPS position (eg Knee Over Pedal Spindle) when crank arm is in the 3 o'clock position. This is standard and works nicely for most riders.

That being said, as you get more advanced in your riding, you will over time develop a feel for what you like. You might like a slightly higher saddle position - or a lower one with more knee bend. You might like to be further back with your shin almost perpendicular to the ground when at the 3 o'clock position. You get the idea, this is all personal to your individual body quirks and likes and feels. For instance I ride with my saddle slightly lower than what would be considered during a "standard" fit.

As to the steerer, that is the tube that extends up through your headset from your forks. Your stem and handlebars are clamped to it and as such allows you to "steer" the bike. The Madone comes stock-out-of-the-box with 3 10mm spacers (or some combination that adds up to 30mm) below the stem, and with the stem 7° angled up. This combination puts the rider in as upright a position that is possible for his/her chosen saddle height. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that and it is fine. Some riders as they get more used to riding road bikes want to get into a more aggressive position on their bikes. This is done by lowering the height of the bars, which in turn is accomplished by flipping the stem to 7° down, and/or with a combination of removing spacer(s) from under the stem. The spacer(s) are then placed on top of the stem and under the cap until the rider is SURE that is the position that he/she likes. At that time, the steerer is cut and the extra spacer(s) on top is/are removed. Note cutting the steerer cannot be reversed! Once cut, it is cut, and can only be cut further (to a point). The remedy for a steerer that is too short, is a whole new fork (which is $$$). If you end up cutting a steerer, it is only done after riding many many miles on your bike. For instance with me, I didn't cut my steerer until after about two months (2000 miles or so), even though I knew exactly where I wanted it. I wanted to get used to the new bike before I committed to cutting it. I apologize for the long explanation. There is actually much more too it, and pictures certainly would help.

You will love riding this bike. As you can probably guess, I ride a lot, and the new Madone's are by far the most comfortable road bike I have ridden, while still retaining the road feel and aggressiveness necessary for racing. I get off my machine fresh after hammering out a century or more. I have more 120+ mile rides under my belt this year than in recent years, if that is any indication.

Good luck
zac
 

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jsedlak said:
I got fit on my bike last night and it took a little over two hours. They did a lot of measuring and adjusting while we discussed how I like to ride and how fit I am. Adjusted some more, flipped the stem, talked saddles, practiced clipping, pedaling, and so on and so forth. The ride got better with each adjustment made too.

Also, I asked them to go over some of the more basic stuff like changing flats, etc and they were happy to show me. If this is your first bike, don't be afraid to just talk and ask questions. The more they know you and understand how you ride, the better the fit.
Awesome, I'm as excited for you as I was for me when I got my new Madone. Thats really exciting, and you will see, with each ride, it gets better and better!
 

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Cutting the steerer isn't as bad as it sounds...

Once you get your handlebar height where you like it (by adding or removing spacers and/or changing the stem angle), you can cut off any excess steering tube that sticks up above your stem. It's not something you would want to do right away because you can temporarily move spacers around above and below the stem to experiment with different heights, but at some point you may wish to cut off any excess. Otherwise, you might end up with a huge stack of spacers on top of your stem (like mine currently has :p ) which is rather unsightly.

...Err, it seems zac beat me to it.
 

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08Madone5.2 said:
Awesome, I'm as excited for you as I was for me when I got my new Madone. Thats really exciting, and you will see, with each ride, it gets better and better!
Thanks!

I can't wait till my core strength is tough enough for the bike. We flipped the stem and put the seat up a lot because that is how I like to ride and my flexibility allows for it. But man, after the 25 miles I did today, my lower back was very tired.
 
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