Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I am getting into road biking and leaning towards either a Specialized Sirrus or Sequoia (both lower-end base models).

My budget is around $500-600 and I am wondering if it's common for people to ride on the MS150 with straight handlebars? I am a younger guy, in decent shape (28 years old).

I've only test driven the curved handlebars before and it seems great for racing, but not very practical for everyday use? Just like to get some expert opinions on this issue, as it has me flip-flopping between these bikes.

Another question is that I found a 2004 Specialized Sequoia for $550, which hits my budget sweet spot. It sounds like a good deal to me, but can someone confirm this?

http://houston.craigslist.org/bik/1062393871.html

Thanks for your help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,474 Posts
One thought, rantish.

longhornguy said:
I've only test driven the curved handlebars before and it seems great for racing, but not very practical for everyday use?
Drop bars (curved) exist mainly to reduce a rider's wind resistance by lowering the upper body when the hands are moved from the top part to the bottom part (the drops) of the bars. It's almost a given that during an MS150, you'll hit some headwinds. When you do, you would find that riding on the drops will make it a little easier to keep your speed. An added benefit of drop bars is that they allow you to temporarily change hand position, upper body position and wrist angle for comfort. That doesn't mean anything on a 2-mile test ride, but it makes a huge difference in your comfort on a 75-mile ride.

But the (avoidable) problem with drop bars is that many of them are on bicycles too small for the rider. The current fashion is to ride (and to buy on bad advice) a bicycle as small as possible. A bicycle on the small side puts drop bars much too low for touring comfort. There are several ways to raise the drop bar on a bicycle too small: many spacers under the stem, an upjutter stem, rotating the bar up, moving the brake-shift levers up, and other goofy ways to search for comfort. And even then, almost all riders of these bikes too small will never, ever ride with the hands on the drops.

For your purposes, it would be better to buy a drop-bar bicycle as large as possible, with the top of the drop bar at least even (better, a few centimeter higher) than the top of the saddle adjusted to your leg length. You'd cruise in comfort just as you would with a flat bar. But come a headwind, or just the need to change hand-, wrist- and upper body position for a while, riding on the drops will actually feel good.

/w
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,484 Posts
longhornguy said:
Another question is that I found a 2004 Specialized Sequoia for $550, which hits my budget sweet spot. It sounds like a good deal to me, but can someone confirm this?

http://houston.craigslist.org/bik/1062393871.html

Thanks for your help
No, not a good deal. That's WAY too much money for that bike used.

But read the previous post and look how it's set up -- the handlebars are higher than the saddle. As a newbie, you will almost certainly like a setup like that. As you develop skills and prefences and get a little more serious, you may want something lower.

Still and all, curved bars are way yonder better than straight bars for road riding. Even if you never get down in the drops, you have many more hand positions on the curved bar than you do on a straight bar -- and you'll find you need them for relief on longer rides.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks a bunch, this advice was super helpful and looks like I will be ponying up the extra cash and going for a Sequioa, brand new, from my LBS.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,484 Posts
longhornguy said:
Thanks a bunch, this advice was super helpful and looks like I will be ponying up the extra cash and going for a Sequioa, brand new, from my LBS.
Great, but one tiny bit of advice: Don't rush in there and hand over whatever's on the sticker. Ask the salesman 'OK, what's your best price on this bike?' He may offer you a bit of a discount. Or offer to throw in something. Doesn't hurt to ask, and most times, there's some wiggle room on the price.

My nephew got a new Sequoia for $550 that way,
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top