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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every once in a while this topic comes up, and no-calorie soft drinks take a thrashing when it comes to weight loss. I often read statements to the effect that they're no better than sugared soft drinks, or even worse.

Now, I've been on a weight reduction program that has worked very well for me. At 52 years of age and 5'10" I've plateaued my weight between 150 and 155 for the past two months, down from 185-190 last summer and a lifetime high of 235 5 years ago. In brief, this has involved a lot of mileage combined with much more fruit and vegetables in my diet, and restriction of simple starches and carbs. My fitness is pretty good--I made the podium in my first circuit race of the season weekend before last.

Here's my question. All along, I've been drinking zero calorie carbonated drinks. I also drink water, G2 (reduced calorie) Gatorade (which I buy in bulk) and nuun because I'm in south Florida and people sweat a lot down here, but my usual beverage is something like the Ice fruit flavored drinks or the BJ's zero calorie carbonated drinks. I moved to G2 from regular Gatorade because I wasn't happy with the calorie load in regular Gatorade, but I can't see any way in which the zero calorie drinks have had any negative effect on either my hydration or weight loss. Long story short, what exactly is so bad about them? If a calorie is a calorie, how can a zero calorie beverage impact my weight loss?
 

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All calories are not the same. Research is now showing that the body doesn't treat fructose the same way it treats glucose. This is a currently active field of research, and how long have glucose and fructose been around? Now compare that to how long artificial sweeteners have been around. The jury is still out on your question and you are conducting your own experiment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If a calorie is a calorie why not just eat your daily amount at McDonald's?

Did you research Aspartame or whatever they are calling it this week?
Thanks, that was helpful. FWIW, I can't remember the last time I set foot in a fast food place of any kind.

I have done enough reading and enough living to wonder whether the anti-zero-calorie-drink stance is founded on substantial objections or some form of ideological zealotry, if I may put it so bluntly. If aspartame gives you migraines, then that's obviously a serious drawback. It has that effect on my wife, but not on me. I quit cooking with Splenda for that reason. That a study in 2007 found there might be a slight increase in cancer risk from aspartame for the offspring of lab mice fed very high levels of the stuff seems like very small beer. Just about anything can give you cancer if you eat enough of it, and with my family history I'm a lot more worried about high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes and congestive heart failure. Per Wikipedia:

"Sucralose has been accepted by several national and international food safety regulatory bodies, including the FDA, Joint Food and Agriculture Organization / World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives, the European Union's Scientific Committee on Food, Health Protection Branch of Health and Welfare Canada, and Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ). Sucralose is one of two artificial sweeteners ranked as "safe" by the consumer advocacy group Center for Science in the Public Interest. The other is neotame.[21][22][23] According to the Canadian Diabetes Association, the amount of sucralose that can be consumed on a daily basis over a person's lifetime without any adverse effects is 9 milligrams per kilogram of body weight.[24][25]

"In determining the safety of sucralose, the FDA reviewed data from more than 110 studies in humans and animals. Many of the studies were designed to identify possible toxic effects, including carcinogenic, reproductive, and neurological effects. No such effects were found, and FDA's approval is based on the finding that sucralose is safe for human consumption." For example, McNeil Nutritional LLC studies submitted as part of its U.S. FDA Food Additive Petition 7A3987 indicated that "in the 2-year rodent bioassays...there was no evidence of carcinogenic activity for either sucralose or its hydrolysis products..."[26]


Have you researched these substances yourself?

Now, I'm not really trying to come off as a defender of these products. I simply find that I've consumed them for years and don't see any evidence of deleterious effects. I've never had a sweet tooth and I still don't--I might be the last ****** in Miami who never puts sugar in his coffee. My Dominican wife and our daughter, neither of whom drink artificial sweeteners, both eat several times as much sugar as I do despite my scolding. The drinks I'm talking about don't contain fructose or anything like it.

I'm not trolling here. If there's smoke, I'd like to see the fire.
 

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The best part is when I'm eating with someone who sees me drinking diet soda and then they try to be clever by citing those articles that explain how it leads to weight gain. I'll let them finish before saying anything. Sometimes they'll go on and on. They have that "I know something you don't know" smirk on their face while explaining this... you can tell they're proud of themselves. They'll say crap like "So if you keep drinking that stuff you won't be skinny for long ha-ha!" Once they've finished, I smirk back and say something like, "Oh yeah totally, I know what you mean. I've lost 60 pounds." They smile and congratulate me, but suddenly have a hint of confusion in their expression. They're not sure how to interpret that. "Yeah, I lost it... by drinking diet soda," (which is an exagerration but I can't help it) then I intentionally take a sip and look directly at them (while trying not to laugh and spit up soda). Some of the looks are priceless. That moment when you realize you're not smart, just out of your league.
 

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I drink Diet Mountain Dew. I quit diet soda for about a year once, then restarted. I never really noticed a difference in my appetite or weight regardless.
I did notice that every time I overate and didn't exercise enough I seemed to gain weight, and whenever I eat properly and exercise I seemed to lose weight and feel better. Breath-taking discoveries on my part I know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes.

What is positive about consuming Aspartame?
My drinks of choice contain sucralose. They taste good and don't make me fat.

It's really not complicated.
 

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One of the big problems with calorie free drinks and such is that it teaches peoples bodies that you can drink an unlimited amount of something sweet, without getting calories. This is not what your body expects so in theory, it will cause your body to crave more of it in order to get calories. Our bodies are programmed to get calories so we can survive.

Now, IMO, athletes have more will power than many Monday morning QB's out there who are likely to be fat. This allows athletes to better regulate what goes into our body (food, calories, cigarettes, etc...) which in turns makes athletes healthier and more likely to not be overweight. Personally, I think calorie free drinks have their place, especially in sports. If you have to drink G2, nuun, or Propel during a ride/run/workout/etc to get some hydration and electrolytes, then please do that.

There are my 2 cents.

PS- I think Truvia is the best tasting zero calorie sugar substitute. If I drink coffee, I put that in it.
 

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I am no expert but I understand that Aspartame is fermented or brewed as the bacteria flavum and glutamicum. Then aspartic acid and phenylalanine are extracted and combined. It is the presence of these two proteins together that causes humans to interpret the taste as sweet.

Other than that... they are harmless. They aren't chemicals, they aren't refined from barrels of oil or made from coal dust or anything. It's just highly refined food. Albeit... I try to avoid most highly refined foods... but that is a different topic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I will agree that eating less sugar causes me to be more sensitive to sweetness in foods, but in my case at least it doesn't follow that I crave more sugar or sweetened foods as a result of drinking sucralose. If I were going to label anything in this thread BS, that idea would be it, as if it's some kind of gateway drug to the abyss of hot fudge sundaes and tres leches cakes.

My in-laws are Dominicans, a cultural group that, as a broad generalization, loves sweets. I am notorious among that tribe as an avoider of sugar. They think there's something wrong with me.
 

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Not knowingly.

No thanks.

Really?

BS.
In order of appearance:
There are studies that link heavy exercise with heart problems, so that's one lol

But you looked up aspartame!

Yes, you can find studies that link almost every type of food and drink with cancer or some type of illness, either due to the nature of the food, the excess consumption of it, or both. It's kind of hypocritical when people avoid aspartame like the plague, yet eat processed foods every day.

Diet AW rootbear is amazing
 

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I too have heard and believed all of the negative stuff about diet coke etc. I recently went on a high protein diet and for the first time I have been able to lose weight very fast without being hungry. The people who coach this diet suggest diet coke smoothies and use of diet cokes etc in general if you are accustomed to using soft drinks as a source of caffeine.

I think that they are not suggesting starting a diet drink habit if you don't already have a caffeine addiction. It's more of a realization that water becomes a bit boring and occasional diet soft drinks are far better than the alternative soft drinks.
Every once in a while this topic comes up, and no-calorie soft drinks take a thrashing when it comes to weight loss. I often read statements to the effect that they're no better than sugared soft drinks, or even worse.

Now, I've been on a weight reduction program that has worked very well for me. At 52 years of age and 5'10" I've plateaued my weight between 150 and 155 for the past two months, down from 185-190 last summer and a lifetime high of 235 5 years ago. In brief, this has involved a lot of mileage combined with much more fruit and vegetables in my diet, and restriction of simple starches and carbs. My fitness is pretty good--I made the podium in my first circuit race of the season weekend before last.

Here's my question. All along, I've been drinking zero calorie carbonated drinks. I also drink water, G2 (reduced calorie) Gatorade (which I buy in bulk) and nuun because I'm in south Florida and people sweat a lot down here, but my usual beverage is something like the Ice fruit flavored drinks or the BJ's zero calorie carbonated drinks. I moved to G2 from regular Gatorade because I wasn't happy with the calorie load in regular Gatorade, but I can't see any way in which the zero calorie drinks have had any negative effect on either my hydration or weight loss. Long story short, what exactly is so bad about them? If a calorie is a calorie, how can a zero calorie beverage impact my weight loss?
 
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