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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you find an Italian steel frame with 126mm spacing (1975-92?) but the paint is just okay and the decals need replacing...Do you touch it (buy it)? I guess the question is do you referbish the classics? If yes, do you paint it? Where do you find the appropriate decals? Stamp
 

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A guy just told me today that a classic bike is worth more to a collector if the paint and decals are original. That being said, you can get a great repaint with period correct decals from several houses, like Cycleops out of California. There've been a few great "restorations" in this forum, most with modern components. They ride just as well as they used to, and probably weigh a few pounds less.

There are many who would agree that since the 70s, builders have tried to get the new materials, aluminum and carbon fiber, to handle and ride as well as the cromoly steel products of the famous Italian masters, Masi, Colnago, DeRosa, Pinarello, and the lesser known builders who emulated them. So there's no question that resurrecting a dead classic would be a great idea.

Who made the bike originally?
 

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Worthy of restoration!

Is the frame straight? No rust on the joints or lugs? Chrome still unpitted? If so, you could enjoy many quality miles out of it, and it would be worthy of a nice paint job, right?

I've ridden my DeRosa since 1985, 20 years, kept it clean and in good adjustment, and it rides as nice as it did the day I bought it. I have a friend who took an Atala, an SLX bike from a lesser builder, from a rider who trashed it with sweat. He ground the rust off it, and had it repainted. It's his favorite ride. He says it does everything well, like my DeRosa and the Pinarellos of the time. Miguel Indurain rode Pinarellos during his reign as Tour champion; so did Pedro Delgado. It will increase in value as the years go by, repainted or not, but of course it'll hold up better under a fresh coat.

It would be fun to see some pictures. It could have been made with Columbus SLX or TSX tubing if made in the early 90s, probably lugged, with a fork crown which within a few more years would be relegated to the past by "unicrown," that is "no crown" forks.
 

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Fredrico said:
Miguel Indurain rode Pinarellos during his reign as Tour champion
he rode a bike with a Pinarello paint job, at the very least ;)

You also forgot to include a certain Jan Ullrich, who rode a Pinarello (or bike with a Pinarello paint job) to victory in the '97 TdF :D
 

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perhaps you mean to refer here to "cyclart", they who do carry the classic respray torch...

www.cyclart.com

they also have a great ebay presence as "cyclartist", an ebay store.


Fredrico said:
if the paint and decals are original. That being said, you can get a great repaint with period correct decals from several houses, like Cycleops out of California.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Thanks for the info gentlemen. I didn't buy the Pinarello, looked briefly into the restoration and the cost just got a bit high. But I am interested in a 126mm rear space bike, mid to late 80's. Currently I have a '72 Peugeot that I fitted with Zues in the early 80's, intending to buy a new frame later. Commuted for years on the thing. Weighs 25 pounds and is quiet as a church mouse. Unfortunately, it is English threaded and I want a top-end steel Italiano (long-held want). One of the things that I find amazing, I have ridden a lot of the new tech stuff, but I get home and the ride on my ol' clunker, I like it better. Well, actually, I rode a 2002 Mondonico Foco specially built for my ever-so lucky brother-in-law with full Campy Record and THAT was a ride! It was then I decided I wanted a vintage Italian steel frame. Now, If only I can find a frame I can afford!
 

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botto said:
he rode a bike with a Pinarello paint job, at the very least ;)

You also forgot to include a certain Jan Ullrich, who rode a Pinarello (or bike with a Pinarello paint job) to victory in the '97 TdF :D
Pegoretti built Mig's bikes and possibly Riis & Ullrichs 96/97 bikes. After 97 Dario started building for the public under his own name, so Pinarello and he ceased their relationship.
Judging by Dario's collection of drawings, he possibly built almost every Tour winner's bike in the 1990's bar 1! Lemond, Indurain & Pantani all had him build their frames in the 90's
 

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Pegoretti

ultimobici said:
Pegoretti built Mig's bikes and possibly Riis & Ullrichs 96/97 bikes. After 97 Dario started building for the public under his own name, so Pinarello and he ceased their relationship.
Judging by Dario's collection of drawings, he possibly built almost every Tour winner's bike in the 1990's bar 1! Lemond, Indurain & Pantani all had him build their frames in the 90's[/QUOTE

Didn't realize that. The friend who's riding the SLX Atala showed me these pictures. Its Pegoretti's "Luigino," lugged steel, flat fork crown, just like a classic DeRosa. Richard Sachs pays homage to this design in a few of his road bikes today.

I wonder how many other bikes Pegoretti made under the Pinarello logo, or if he was simply called in to build custom mounts for specific riders? At any rate, the classic bike is still alive and obtainable.
 

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botto said:
he rode a bike with a Pinarello paint job, at the very least ;)

You also forgot to include a certain Jan Ullrich, who rode a Pinarello (or bike with a Pinarello paint job) to victory in the '97 TdF :D
sure.. they were built by pegoretti but.. pegoretti was working w/ deda experimenting tube shapes. the radius tubing, used on pinarellos in mid 90s, was the result from that collaboration. soo, pegoretti was working for pinarello in a way and their results showed on OUR pinarellos. i don't see any rip off.
 
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