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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is kind of a followup to this thread to be in the proper forum:
http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=62111

I'm 165 pounds and looking for good strong wheels I can use for commuting but also want them somewhat light enough to keep up on club rides (I seem to average 13mph right now in the hilly area I live but working on getting faster). I currently have bontrager select wheels which have never been trued since I get them (came with the bike) and still seem pretty true (based on looking between the brake pads) after 2.5 years and 2000 miles. I plan to run 700x25 tires.


These were recommended:
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=131&subcategory=1197&brand=&sku=17460&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=

Which are at least 1950grams based on the weight of these which are lower in spoke count:
http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/12008-365_SHIUL1-3-Parts-136-Shimano-Parts-Road/Shimano-Ultegra-Wheelset-w_-Mavic-Open-Pro-Rims.htm

I'm trying to stay below $400, any opinions? (although if I can get a set that is stronger then my current set, better performance, so basically a good set of wheels I can use for everything and will last a long time I'd be willing to pay more) I know the whole pick two rule, but I'm pretty sure I'm planning to spend more then the cost of my original wheels so shouldn't I be able to get better wheels?

Thanks
 

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Easy answer

Colorado Cyclist and Excel Sports both have wheel builds based on stock parts that will come in under your $300 target and be way lighter than 1900 gm. If it were me, a set of hubs of your choice from Campy or Shimano, 32 spoke, 3X, 15/16 spokes, and Velocity Aerohead/Aerohead OC. Scratches all itches from a performance standpoint, easily maintained, never has to go "back to the factory" for repair due to some proprietary parts. Typically, such a wheel set will be from $100 to $400 cheaper than the factory wheel that has the same performance and features.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So you think 36 spokes is overkill? My current 20 front 24 rear are still true, but then I've only commuted through the city for a few weeks now (the rear hub does have issues though). So 32 spokes front and back?

If my drivetrain is all Shimano (mostly Ultergra) does it matter using a campy hub? (i.e will the hob work with my 9 speed ultegra gears?)
 

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enki42ea said:
So you think 36 spokes is overkill? My current 20 front 24 rear are still true, but then I've only commuted through the city for a few weeks now (the rear hub does have issues though). So 32 spokes front and back?

If my drivetrain is all Shimano (mostly Ultergra) does it matter using a campy hub? (i.e will the hob work with my 9 speed ultegra gears?)
Use either ultegra or 105 hubs with the build. Both are high quality and durable. You won't have any compatible issues with 9 or 10 speed drivetrains with those hubs.

-Eric
 

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enki42ea said:
Pretty sure they are including the weight of the skewers in that 1950g... so for comparison they would be just over 1800g.

Get butted spokes and a good build with Shimano hubs and brass nipples. I hear Velocity rims are good, and a good value. Ergott actually builds wheels, so you could PM him and see what he could do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Kerry Irons said:
Colorado Cyclist and Excel Sports both have wheel builds based on stock parts that will come in under your $300 target and be way lighter than 1900 gm. If it were me, a set of hubs of your choice from Campy or Shimano, 32 spoke, 3X, 15/16 spokes, and Velocity Aerohead/Aerohead OC. Scratches all itches from a performance standpoint, easily maintained, never has to go "back to the factory" for repair due to some proprietary parts. Typically, such a wheel set will be from $100 to $400 cheaper than the factory wheel that has the same performance and features.
Going by Colorado Cyclist using 32 front/back with your recomendations (except MAVIC Open Pro rims as they didn't have Velocity Aerohead) seem to be about the same weight (slightly more) then my current Bontrager Select wheels. Would these be much stronger then my current wheels? (would be nice if under hard pedalling the rear rim wouldn't hit the brake pads, but then that may be related to the problem I'm having with the rear hub) So would seem like I'd get stronger wheels but they wouldn't have any effect on my speed (maybe a bit slower as my Select rims seems slightly more aero)

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No difference

enki42ea said:
Would these be much stronger then my current wheels? (would be nice if under hard pedalling the rear rim wouldn't hit the brake pads, but then that may be related to the problem I'm having with the rear hub)
There would be little difference, but you would have a solid, cost effective, and easy to maintain wheel set. If your brake pads are rubbing, consider setting them wider. A lot of people seem to think that they should be set super close to the rim, but in fact you will get better braking control if the levers bottom out just short of hitting the bar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Kerry Irons said:
There would be little difference, but you would have a solid, cost effective, and easy to maintain wheel set. If your brake pads are rubbing, consider setting them wider. A lot of people seem to think that they should be set super close to the rim, but in fact you will get better braking control if the levers bottom out just short of hitting the bar.
I can hit the lever to the bar, but only when in the drops and when I squeeze as hard as I can. The wheel also only hits the brake pads lightly on hard climbs so its not that bad.
 

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enki42ea said:
I can hit the lever to the bar, but only when in the drops and when I squeeze as hard as I can. The wheel also only hits the brake pads lightly on hard climbs so its not that bad.
What kind of wheel are you riding? I am 215# and don't rub the brakes under effort with a 3x32 Open Pro wheelset. I don't think that I make any of my wheels rub and that includes a Spinergy Xaero with PBO spokes. My light commuter wheelset that I use on the days I take the road all the way in vice 3/4 of the way on a MUT is a set of Roval Pave cyclocross wheels. They weigh around 1900 grams and roll really nice. Not as heavy duty as my Salsa/ultegra/14g/3X32 wheelset with armadillos, but close.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It doesn't rub much now that I opened up the brakes and some of the movement is from the hub, Still true so I'm guessing its the hub more then the rest of the wheel causing it. Its the Bontrager Select wheels the bike came with.
 

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Neutrons aren't any "better" than protons, just lighter, which means for your purposes they're a little less durable.

Both have excellent hubs.

Campag wheels have a good reputation for reliability -- among the best of the factory-builts. Several teammates have and love 'em. My teammate, a middleweight at 175#, has run his Euruses in everything, from a certain memorable ride down an 8-mile gravel descent on a snowy day, races in all conditions, seen 3 crashes, and with only re-greasing are still "perfect."
 
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