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I have Bontrager wheel sets, two of them. 16 / 20 spoke config. Radial spoke front wheel.

Yeah, OK, you can heap abuse upon my geriatric, lard butt. These days I'm up to about 240 lbs. (No, I'm not ten feet tall.)

I'm fastidious about picking a line through the crap in the pavement, cracks, expansion joints, asphalt patches, pot holes -- I avoid it all. (I don't get flats either. I watch the road, comes from years and years of racing on sew-ups.)

700 C X 25 tires, medium heavy, the stock stuff on a Trek 1500.

The shop tells me I'll be OK on these wheels. But I'm seeking a second opinion. (And by April/May I'll be back down under 200 lbs.)

Thoughts/discussion ??? :confused: :confused: :confused:
 

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mine broke

mine held up for around 9000 miles. I ended up pulling a spoke thru the rim. After looking closer the rim was cracked around alot of the spokes. I just didn't notice cuz it looked like dust and dried water marks. After getting stiffer wheels I could tell how noodley the bonti's were, not bad or slow just alot of flexing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
b987654 said:
mine held up for around 9000 miles. I ended up pulling a spoke thru the rim. After looking closer the rim was cracked around alot of the spokes. I just didn't notice cuz it looked like dust and dried water marks. After getting stiffer wheels I could tell how noodley the bonti's were, not bad or slow just alot of flexing.


Yeah, but what do you weigh and what are you riding on? I mean road surface, what tires, what tire pressures?

Cleaning the bike thoroughly after a ride should provide an opportunity to inspect rims, spokes, wheels generally.
 

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155. nice roads and some chipseal. only a few railroad tracks and I hop them lightly. mich carbon 23's 110 in the winter and conti gp3000 and vittoria open courso in the sun.
 

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I'm 244, riding some Supergo Korsos--and doing it single-speed no less. This is done on the streets of Tucson, which are much like the dirt paths followed by the ancient peoples who lived here centuries ago, but significantly rougher, covered in bigger rocks, and possessing more broken glass.

I've had no worries at all, but you need to be TRULY "fastidious about picking a line," and not just well-intentioned. I'm also very careful to stand up a lot, transfer weight around, and apply all the other assorted MTB tricks I know on these wheels. I run 25c Conti GatorSkins on them as well. 28s won't work with the frame I have, but they might be a nice bit of (relatively) cheap insurance.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
28's won't clear my stays.

But yes, super fastidious about the line. I rode sew-ups for years when racing. Natural rubber and then cut with just thorns and sharp rocks. I "unweight" at bumps and RR tracks. Actually stop and ease over the track unless I know the line on it from experience.

Mostly I just wonder about the weigh limit on these 16/20 laced wheels. I weighed nearly 100 lbs less when I was racing back in the 60's. Those days are gone forever I think.
 

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I have a trek 1200 with the stock wheels - I got ~1500 miles out of the stock tires and have only had to have my rims trued once after a wreck/pile-up in the group I ride with. I've ridden it on dirt rails, gravel roads, barely paved roads, and nicely paved roads - usually decent paved roads. My current tires are 700x23 conti 3000 4 seasons that I normally run at 120psi and need replacing; however they have only had one true flat (two other flats due to using too old of a tube and having it blow out at the stem). I weigh between 220lb and 235lb depending on if I'm lifting or not - maybe one day I'll be back in the 205 - 215 range.

For duarability I'd say I'm happy with the wheels after ~4k miles of lunch time rides/quasi-friendly races and commuting. However, I do need to upgrade the frame/BB-crank/wheels as they are noodles for me when I'm sprinting.
 

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open pros

At 220 lbs I blew up the rear wheel of a set of Race X Lites while traversing a RR track. It was nasty: a couple spokes broke and both the rim and hub were totalled. I'm probably somewhat to blame, but even so it convinced me that low spoke count wheels aren't necessarily ideal for big guys. Switched to a set of CO Cyclist built ultegra open pros and couldn't be happier. They stay true, they're comfortable and I don't have to worry excessively about "picking a line". It allows me to enjoy the ride more, especially when I'm out in the boon docks.
 

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Best piece of advice I can give in this situation: if it makes you uncomfortable enough to ask us for an opinion, don't ride the wheels. Piece of mind is very important when you're out in outer BFE.

I have the Ritchey Pro wheels (20/28) 'cause I firgure they're gonna be strong enough to hold up under my fat arse (~200# at the moment) and not flex much. Turned out to be a good choice 'cause I haven't had any problems with them in the few years I've had them.

I usually (95% of the time) ride a pair of 32/32 Reflex Ceramic wheels. I save the aero stuff for intervals and fast group rides.

HTH,

M
 

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My MTB is a trek 8000, and the Rolf Sattelite wheels on that are very similar to the Bonti's on the 1500. In the 7 years that I've had that bike I've ranged from a high of 250 to a low of 189, and have raced, trained, played, crashed, commuted on those wheels. They have been rock solid. I did last summer start having a problem with one of the spokes un-screwing. I replaced it and the nipple and spoke prepped it, and it's back to true and holding solid. I say if you know how to ride light (bmx racing since I was 6) you can keep any well built wheel alive, and I think these are well built wheels.
 

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Buy some 1700 gram M28 Neuvations. Ride them a lot. Lose 300 grams (or more) off your ass.
The 300 grams in your wheels won't make a difference...
 

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MShaw has it right

MShaw said:
Best piece of advice I can give in this situation: if it makes you uncomfortable enough to ask us for an opinion, don't ride the wheels. Piece of mind is very important when you're out in outer BFE.

I have the Ritchey Pro wheels (20/28) 'cause I firgure they're gonna be strong enough to hold up under my fat arse (~200# at the moment) and not flex much. Turned out to be a good choice 'cause I haven't had any problems with them in the few years I've had them.

I usually (95% of the time) ride a pair of 32/32 Reflex Ceramic wheels. I save the aero stuff for intervals and fast group rides.

HTH,

M

I'm 6'5", 250lbs (also coming down, but my football/hockey days will still have me at 225 when "thin"). I have ridden everything from Rolf Pros, Velomax, etc. I was OK with these as the rims were higher profile and sturdy. What I did not like was the lateral flex from the low spoke count. I am currently riding a set of Campy Proton's, where I love the ride, but every time I look at the DT Revolution thin spokes (20/24) I get nervous. As MShaw put it, I wasn't comfortable, so I needed to change.

I did my research, and decided to get a nice set of handbuilts from Mike at www.oddsandendos.com. I want a light, fast set of wheels that I am just not going to worry about. He is building me a great set of DT Swiss 240 hubs, Velocity Aerohead rims, 32 spoke front and rear (2x front, 3x DS/2xNDS rear). Total weight should be about 1550 grams (but who's counting!). $490 for the set (DT Swiss hubs are amost $400 by themselves at Excel, etc.) The important thing is I will not be worrying about whether the next bump or leap out of the saddle is going to shred the wheels.

The new wheels should be here in about 10 days. Can't wait. BTW, I have an amost new set of Protons about to go on eBay!
 

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Take them off and put them on E-bay and use the proceeds to by a nice solid set of wheels with 28 spokes up front and 32 3x in the back. When one of those spokes goes while you're in a downhill and going faster than blazes cause your 240, should you recover, you will kill that guy at the LBS....

I'm 215 and wouldn't get on those if my life depended on it. At least with non-paired wheels, you have a chance surviving. With a broken spoke on those wheels, you are going over the handlebars....

The Flash
 

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The Flash said:
Take them off and put them on E-bay and use the proceeds to by a nice solid set of wheels with 28 spokes up front and 32 3x in the back. When one of those spokes goes while you're in a downhill and going faster than blazes cause your 240, should you recover, you will kill that guy at the LBS....

I'm 215 and wouldn't get on those if my life depended on it. At least with non-paired wheels, you have a chance surviving. With a broken spoke on those wheels, you are going over the handlebars....

The Flash
That's right: you'll catapult right over the handlebars as your front tire, with an insanely huge coefficient of friction stops dead in the road, without skidding. No, wait, I know: the rear wheel will lock up, generate tons of heat through skidding, causing the rear tube to explode, catapulting you over the bars. No? Oh, I know, your hyperbole got the best of you.

I doubt the Bontragers would taco and send a person over the handlebars. Sure, the'll go way out of true and hit the chainstays or the front brake, but that's just gonna cause tires to lock up. Sure a guy might crash, but he's not going to become a projectile, rocketing over his handlebars.
 

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So you don't think you are going over the bars when the front wheel collapses because one of those paired spokes breaks?!?!? You must be an eternal optimist....

At 240lbs, when that spoke goes, even at 10 miles an hour that wheel will probably just collapse the hub to the ground, grinding that fork into the pavement making for quite the awkward angle to hold ones' balance on. This is the problem with the paired spoke concept...amazingly light, but when they break, they break big.....

He's goin' over.....

The Flash
 
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