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I have a little anecdote and wanted to see the myriad of responses as to what you all might do in the same situation...

So I recently picked up a new Felt road bike from the LBS and was out on the maiden trip a few days ago. I was in the middle of sprint intervals and noticed the front derailleur wasn't adjusted correctly (chain slip, the occasional grind). During a 25-27mph spin up the front derailleur kicked the chain off the big ring (high adjustment was too high apparently)...well imagine my issue of falling onto the top tube (onto my boyz), left foot comes free from pedal and the bike fishtails like crazy about three times...I come to a stop by dragging a cleat while sitting on my top tube, thanking the creator I still have front teeth and all my skin (almost went over the handlebars).

I immediately rode back to the shop and had them adjust it properly. After telling the story, they didn't really have much to say...I mean, what the hell?! They send a bike out the door without even servicing it and/or adjusting cables and derailleurs off the shop floor? wasn't too happy....but thankful I have all my teeth.

What would you do?
 

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What'd I do?
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Find a new shop. You weren't hurt. All the equipment still works. If they didn't offer an apology or anything, and you're not confident in the work they're doing, just don't go back. If you like them, talk to them, see what happened, see if they'll make nice (IT'S NOT AN OBLIGATION).
 

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a similar episode...

a similar episode happened to me. long story short...i will never go back to that shop. from other encounters with them it has been made clear to me that they want my $$$, but not my satisfacton.
 

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Yeah, that's crap. The LBS has an obligation to make sure the equipment they send out their doors is in safe working order. If that LBS is your only option, I don't know what to tell you. Otherwise, I'd spend my money somewhere else.
 

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Screwed

bahueh said:
...I was in the middle of sprint intervals and noticed the front derailleur wasn't adjusted correctly (chain slip, the occasional grind)...
...What would you do?
What I would do is probably take a screwdriver and fix it before doing any more sprint intervals. Hey the shop should not have sent it out that way but you bear some personal responsibility for ignoring an obvious problem.

Find a new bike shop and buy yourself a screwdriver.
 

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I don't let other people touch my stuff in the first place, so...

But if you saw the der wasn't adjusted right, why do sprints with it? Kind of like saying you saw your front skewer flopping loose and you decided to do a bunny hop.
 

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I'm w/Henry

Henry Chinaski said:
I don't let other people touch my stuff in the first place, so...

But if you saw the der wasn't adjusted right, why do sprints with it? Kind of like saying you saw your front skewer flopping loose and you decided to do a bunny hop.
I can't really imagine taking a brand new bike out and immediately doing sprint intervals on it. I'd want to see that everything was working right first, which means pushing the limits without being on the limit. It's like having a buddy drive you to the top of Mt. Evans with a brand new bike so you could find out how well it descends and brakes. :)
 

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My LBS spends a considerable amount of time (more than I would) getting everything all in tune and aligned before a bike ever leaves that shop. Although I must say, I did rough up one of the cross demo's pretty well first time out... but they do an awesome job.

It's all about customer service. Do it right the first time (damn, that's my father's voice...).
 

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Having once worked in a LBS I too would look for another shop, or at least talk to the owner if you didn't the first time, and maybe still look for another shop. With new bikes, we had the bike put together fresh out of the box (that's what I did as the shop grunt) and then one of the senior mechanics would give it a going over to make sure all of the initial adjustments were good, which they generally were! Typically a front deraileur wouldn't need much adjustment even fresh out of the box, at least that I recall, especially if a braze on.
 

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So, if I'm reading your description of the problem correctly, bahueh, you're upset that your bike wasn't functioning perfectly on it's maiden ride.

If this is accurate, you should stop and think for a minute before faulting the shop for poor mechanical procedures.

New bikes break in. Cables stretch, spokes detension, waxy chains stick, and other parts work their way into (and out of) position. This is unavoidable, and is to be expected.

Now, it's quite possible the limit screws were <i>severely</i> misadjusted. If that's indeed the case, your beef with the shop might have some validity. Otherwise, I recommend taking the break-in process into account when riding a brand-new bike for the first time.
 

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well-

My opinion since you asked-

you noticed the front derailleur was misadjusted - that would be the shop's fault

you kept riding it aggressively - NOW - that wold be your fault and everything thereafter is your responsibility

no?
 

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eminence grease
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You know what?

Every bike that I build works perfectly on the maiden ride. But that's because I know I'm going to be riding it. In other words, I take the time on the stand to make sure it's correct before I swing a leg over it. As much time as it needs.
 

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eminence grease
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You've just described why I took the time and money for books and tools and experience to do 100% of my work.

When I made the jump to my first "serious" bike (read: the mind boggling cost of $1100) I left the shop with a big fat grin on my face. I was in the big-time and I'd developed a real-live working relationship with my LBS. Well, the grin lasted until I blew a tube about 2 miles from my house out in the woods. Walked home during which time, the second tube blew also.

Now, I know how to change tubes, but I said "no, less than 10 miles on the bike, they can fix it." So I took the wheels in. First words out of the wrench's mouth "oh yea, I was wondering if anyone had put rim strips in that bike."

That was the last time I darkened their door, and you can only imagine the recommendations they've received from me.

I think the problem is two-fold. One, there are lots of incompetent people working on bikes and two, many just don't take the time to do the job like their life depended on it. And while they may have a huge service backlog, there is no excuse for the latter. As the business climate changes, and LBSs are forced to make the transition to earning their dollars through good service, they'd better figure that out.

Time for a new store for you, unless you want to do the right thing and learn how to do it yourself.
 

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terry b said:
You know what?

Every bike that I build works perfectly on the maiden ride. But that's because I know I'm going to be riding it. In other words, I take the time on the stand to make sure it's correct before I swing a leg over it. As much time as it needs.
A front der can shift great in the stand and not be quite right on the road the first time. Your first ride on a new bike should be kinda easy. Go easy with the front shifting to make sure it's dialed (if it's not you can mess up the finish of those new cranks, or worse). Also after the first ride or two recheck that the cranks are still tight and the hs hasn't loosed up a tad from the cups being set in better. You'll get some cable stretch/housing compression in the first couple of rides, too, and the wheels might need a wee tweak here and there.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
that's ingenious, thanks. so by that same token, if you were to buy a car and the fan belt was not tightened enough, I could go tell you to buy a laser timer and do it yourself?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I was in the process of checking the bike out actually...I could have been going a bit faster but have never experienced a chain popping off the big ring after it had been set there for a minute or two...my poor assumption was "once its on, its on"...which lead me to believe I could stand up on the pedals. the FD had only been rubbing up til that point..

I'm with some of you in that I do take personal responsibility for the condition of the bike (learned that while working in the aviation industry...its always the pilots responsibility to check the aircraft). The shop has some good guys in it so I'm hesitant to bash em...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I'm moving that direction slowly...one piece of shop equipment/tools at a time...I guess I just make the comparison to new cars...you expect the damn thing to work correctly when you drive it away.

but alas, in today's customer service environment (or lack thereof) the only person watching my back is me unfortunately..
 

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bahueh said:
that's ingenious, thanks. so by that same token, if you were to buy a car and the fan belt was not tightened enough, I could go tell you to buy a laser timer and do it yourself?
I can't tell who you were replying to, but I've never bought a new car. I do some of the basic maintenance on my old cars myself and personally know the people who do the rest. They are experts and more anal than me. I do a quick check of my tires before every drive and have the brakes checked frequently.

But a bike is not a car. Bikes are really really easy. Also, a mechanical problem on a bike can be much more dangerous than a mechanical problem on a car. I don't want to put myself in a position of being injured or killed cause some guy who gets paid $8 and hour doesn't know what he's doing. Ultimately, you are responsible for your own equipment. I know it's popular to play victim and blame others, but...

Or course you are right, the shop screwed up. But being right won't do you much good if you are dead.
 
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