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Beetpull DeLite
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Discussion Starter #1
I took the bait and clicked on Neuvation's ad banner to take a gander at their wheels, and was pretty impressed. While reading about the production method, I noticed that they use Loctite on their spoke nipples.

I subscribe to the theory that if a wheelset is built correctly, there's no need for Loctite. When building my mt. bike's rear wheel, I used anti-sieze compound. Things happen sometimes and a wheel will get out of true, and I would hate to not be able to true them back up.

What are your all's thoughts on this? Would I be able to true these, or would the nipples be pretty well locked in place? I might email Neuvation's owner to get his opinion, but it doesn't hurt to have more than one.

Thanks,
Brian
 

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wheelbuilder
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2,220 Posts
GirchyGirchy said:
I subscribe to the theory that if a wheelset is built correctly, there's no need for Loctite.
Thanks,
Brian
You subscribe to the correct theory. Lock-tite is an indication of poor wheelbuilding technique. I only use spoke freeze on radial laced spokes because there is a chance thay might back out over time. I know I'm not alone in my thoughts on this.

-Eric
 

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Registered
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675 Posts
GirchyGirchy said:
I took the bait and clicked on Neuvation's ad banner to take a gander at their wheels, and was pretty impressed. While reading about the production method, I noticed that they use Loctite on their spoke nipples.

I subscribe to the theory that if a wheelset is built correctly, there's no need for Loctite. When building my mt. bike's rear wheel, I used anti-sieze compound. Things happen sometimes and a wheel will get out of true, and I would hate to not be able to true them back up.

What are your all's thoughts on this? Would I be able to true these, or would the nipples be pretty well locked in place? I might email Neuvation's owner to get his opinion, but it doesn't hurt to have more than one.

Thanks,
Brian
I think all the Neuvations use bladed spokes, so it isn't a problem to prevent them from winding up when truing them. Most pre-built wheels seem to come with spoke-freeze or a similar locking compound, probably "just for the hell of it" because it seems to imply to people that the wheel will never go out of true, yet it is still easy to true when the time inevitably comes. I'm also a believer in not using thread-locking compounds, especially when using alloy nipples.
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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6,491 Posts
GirchyGirchy said:
I took the bait and clicked on Neuvation's ad banner to take a gander at their wheels, and was pretty impressed. While reading about the production method, I noticed that they use Loctite on their spoke nipples.

I subscribe to the theory that if a wheelset is built correctly, there's no need for Loctite. When building my mt. bike's rear wheel, I used anti-sieze compound. Things happen sometimes and a wheel will get out of true, and I would hate to not be able to true them back up.

What are your all's thoughts on this? Would I be able to true these, or would the nipples be pretty well locked in place? I might email Neuvation's owner to get his opinion, but it doesn't hurt to have more than one.

Thanks,
Brian
There are many strengths of Loctite. They probably use the weakest which was designed to be used on adjustment screws for instrumentation. It prevents the screws from moving with vibration and, more importantly, allows for easier adjustment in the future. Very similar to Spoke Prep. Trying to tune a 4 year old wheel that was built without anything and you will appreciate the Loctite. - TF
 

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Arrogant roadie.....
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4,232 Posts
In the field of Machinebuilding, Loctite is very common. There is 222, a weak version, which would be perfect for spokes. 242 is a bit stronger, probably better for things more like, say, an alternator bolt on a car. 425 is used for plastic-metal interfaces (set screws in nylon gears, etc, and 680.....well, trust me, you don't want to use 680 on spoke nipples......
 

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4,103 Posts
Neuvations (at least the earlier models) had 16/20 heavy gauge (2.3/2.0mm) spokes in a medium weight rims. The rim is usually the limiting factor in spoke tension, meaning that the tension in these spokes could not be super high... meaning that they are not "stretched" very far compared to a wheel that uses light spokes (like 2.0/1.5mm). The load cycle for a spoke is primarily one of detensioning where the wheel meets the road, where the rim is deflected towards the hub. A heavy spoke can completely lose tension with the same wheel load that that would only reduce tension in a light spoke by 1/2. When spokes lose tension, they can unscrew if they are not locked. This is probably why Neuvation uses Locktite.

I think it is a bad idea to have spokes losing tension... Locktite or not. An adequate number of light butted spokes with proper tension and good building technique should result in the longest lasting and most trouble free wheels.
 
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