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I am hoping someone else had this problem and/or might be able to shed light on this. I'm a 6'2" roadie (Cat. 2), with a long torso and short legs. I've always had some knee/hip/ankle pain. Years ago I was fitted, and was told that I needed to move my seat forward to achieve proper knee over pedal spindle position. However, I was really far behind that point and the guy only moved me about halfway between where I was and where I should be. So recently I was fitted again, and they want to move me a further 3.5 cm forward. This means that my seat tube angle would have to be somewhere around 75 degrees, with very little set back on the post. Riding in this position feels good insofar as my lower body is concerned (obviously I'm scrunched up across the top tube). Anyone have similar experience and/or advice on frame design to address this problem? Thanks...
 

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The web is a MUT
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Might not be much help here but I'm built similar, but a little shorter than you. I found that bike frames with longer relative top tubes fit me better, Colnago and Lemond frames for example tend to have longer top tubes.

If you're now getting scrunched over the top tube then that can lead to other issues.
 

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Go Custom

motloc13 said:
I am hoping someone else had this problem and/or might be able to shed light on this. I'm a 6'2" roadie (Cat. 2), with a long torso and short legs. I've always had some knee/hip/ankle pain. Years ago I was fitted, and was told that I needed to move my seat forward to achieve proper knee over pedal spindle position. However, I was really far behind that point and the guy only moved me about halfway between where I was and where I should be. So recently I was fitted again, and they want to move me a further 3.5 cm forward. This means that my seat tube angle would have to be somewhere around 75 degrees, with very little set back on the post. Riding in this position feels good insofar as my lower body is concerned (obviously I'm scrunched up across the top tube). Anyone have similar experience and/or advice on frame design to address this problem? Thanks...
Talk to a custom builder. I worked with a guy that did a fit for me that had a fit cycle and a spin scan. He gave me the measurements for where I was the most comfortable and producing the most power. We sent those measurements to Joe at Primus Mootry who built the frame to my specs. I had the opposite problem, long legs and short torso, so Joe played with the angles to produce a frame that fit and didn't handle like crap. The frame actually handles better than anything else I've ridden including Fondriests, Wilier, and obviously mass produced things.

So my advice, go custom and work out the specs with the builder, they're good at that stuff. You can check our Primus Mootry at www.primusmootry.com.
 

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motloc13 said:
I am hoping someone else had this problem and/or might be able to shed light on this. I'm a 6'2" roadie (Cat. 2), with a long torso and short legs. I've always had some knee/hip/ankle pain. Years ago I was fitted, and was told that I needed to move my seat forward to achieve proper knee over pedal spindle position. However, I was really far behind that point and the guy only moved me about halfway between where I was and where I should be. So recently I was fitted again, and they want to move me a further 3.5 cm forward. This means that my seat tube angle would have to be somewhere around 75 degrees, with very little set back on the post. Riding in this position feels good insofar as my lower body is concerned (obviously I'm scrunched up across the top tube). Anyone have similar experience and/or advice on frame design to address this problem? Thanks...

stocks bikes are made to fit the avg joe. With a steep STA requirement of 75 degrees, typically found on small bikes (50cm) and not bigger ones, you prob need custom. Remember, STA affects the effective top tube, and even on bigger stock bikes, those with longer TTs will have a slacker STA, so if you get your saddle positioned right the cockpit will still feel tight. You could throw of a real long stem, but handling might be thrown off. Custom.
 

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IIRC Chris Boardman rode a 52st x 59tt bike so its not uncommon. Colnago's always been on the short side TT-wise, so stay away from them.

I'm shorter than you and I've had pretty good luck with Specialized bikes over the years.

Custom may be your best option.

Russ Denny makes great bikes. I've got one and love it.

M
 

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Have you considered frames with a sloping top tube? I'm sort of in the same boat as you (5'10" with a 31" inseam) and have issues finding a bike with adequate stand-over and the proper top tube length. Granted, I'm not 6'2" so things might be different when you get up to those heights but if you can fit onto a mass-produced frame, that's potentially money saved.

Also, I'm curious as to what "kind" of fit specialist are you going to? Someone who plops you onto a bike a tweaks the stem/saddle until it looks right or someone with an full-fledged adjustable "frame", such as those used by Serrotta? IMHO, I think it might be worth your time and effort to go with a fit specialist that employs the Serrotta or (something similar) to get your measurements. If you want your cake and eat it too, try to find a fitter that's as tall as you, so you'll have someone that can empathize with you.

Good luck,
Sam
 

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I've got a similar problem--i'm about 6'1" with a 32 in inseam. My first road bike was a Lemond and it never felt right because I could get the correct KNOP and still have adequate reach (though i got it pretty close). My second bike was Llitespeed sirius with a sloping top tube. I got an XL which game a very long top tube without having to worry about standover. I love that bike and will probably stick with sloping top tubes from now on.

So, I agree with SamDC--try a compact frame. Custom would be nice too, but too darn expensive for me in most cases.
 

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Same issue here. I paid for a custom fit, then searched for a stock frame to match. Found a slopped TT Merlin that had specs almost dead on to what I needed.
 

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nmnmnmnm
 

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motloc13 said:
I am hoping someone else had this problem and/or might be able to shed light on this. I'm a 6'2" roadie (Cat. 2), with a long torso and short legs. I've always had some knee/hip/ankle pain. Years ago I was fitted, and was told that I needed to move my seat forward to achieve proper knee over pedal spindle position. However, I was really far behind that point and the guy only moved me about halfway between where I was and where I should be. So recently I was fitted again, and they want to move me a further 3.5 cm forward. This means that my seat tube angle would have to be somewhere around 75 degrees, with very little set back on the post. Riding in this position feels good insofar as my lower body is concerned (obviously I'm scrunched up across the top tube). Anyone have similar experience and/or advice on frame design to address this problem? Thanks...
knee over pedal spindle is only a rough guide, and you have to find your own position from there. frankly, you're a cat 2 rider and you should already know by now. but if you don't, you have to keep experimenting - the previous fitter probably didn't want you to make too big a jump, which would be why he only moved you halfway.

anyway, most bikes in your size will have STAs more like 73 degrees. if being too far behind the pedal spindle is really what's causing your pains, you would need a custom bike. for now, get a zero-offset post like a Thomson and move your seat forward. me, the STA on my custom roadie is 75.5 degrees with a zero-offset post. I'm 5'4".
 

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We could almost be clones. I'm a former cat 2, 6'3" tall with a 32 inseam. My sleeve length is 36.5" I'm riding a 60cm DeRosa. It has a 59cm top tube & I'm using a 140 stem. Fits me perfectly.

I'd shop for bikes with relatively long top tubes. I've never owned a sloping tube bike, and know little about them.
 

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Lemond Zurich

I'm 6'2" too also and I found a 61cm (c-t-c) LeMond Zurich fits me perfectly with a 13cm stem with a 12cm handlebar drop. Nice roomy cockpit for all day riding down in the drops (if I wanted to). Like other posters here I have a zero offset seat post.

I also have a Schwinn Fastback (sloping top tube) that I was able to transfer the same position as my LeMond.
 

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Don't Do It....

I'm willing to bet that none of these fitters has ever measured the weight balance of you on your bike, in an agressive cornering position. Moving the saddle that far forward could place far too much weight on the front of the bike and too much weight on your hands. Ideally, you want 45-46%.

What sort of frame geoemtry are you using? What stem length?

Placing the knee directly over the pedal is NOT necessary for efficient pedaling. I've experimented with saddle positions that covered at least a 3cm range, all with the knee well behind the pedal spindle. What I found is that I could apply more torque to the pedals with the knee further back. Moving the saddle forward promoted a higher cadence and lower torque pedaling style.

Your leg shortness must be due to a short upper leg. It's hard to imagine a femur so short that you would need a steep STA and a no-offset post. The ony time I've ever used a no-offset post is with a 72.5 degree STA.
 
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