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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a set of Look 396's, and they are OKAY, but I have yet to find a cleat position that doesn't give me hot spots/pressure point pain after about an hour or so. It's not pain like "oh no I have to stop now", but it's just annoying.

I have a pair of Sidi Genius 4's, so it's not a case of the shoes being too soft in the sole, etc.

I was thinking of trying another pedal, probably shimano, but am not sure if I have tried everything to try to fix the pressure spots.

Any ideas? Anyone with similar situations? Any pedal recs that shouldn't cause a pressure point?

-10k
 

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10kman said:
I have a set of Look 396's, and they are OKAY, but I have yet to find a cleat position that doesn't give me hot spots/pressure point pain after about an hour or so. It's not pain like "oh no I have to stop now", but it's just annoying.

I have a pair of Sidi Genius 4's, so it's not a case of the shoes being too soft in the sole, etc.

I was thinking of trying another pedal, probably shimano, but am not sure if I have tried everything to try to fix the pressure spots.

Any ideas? Anyone with similar situations? Any pedal recs that shouldn't cause a pressure point?

-10k
When hot spots occur, my exerience point to the shoes instead of the pedals. I tried SiDi Genius for about a week and had to switch to another shoe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I thought it was the shoes too, but it seems to be such an isolated point of pain, that I am blaming the pedals. I've had similar things on the MTB, and switching pedals fixed it.

Could be the shoes though, who knows. Maybe trying aftermarket insoles could help? Superfeet possibly??
 

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same problem, same pedal

i found i had to move the cleat farther forward than i was used to riding with and not crank the pedals down as tight so that i had more lateral movement. do you run? i am a distance runner as well and i overpronate so naturally i am on the outside ball of my foot, same place i was getting hot spots from the pedal.the pedal position was forcing my foot to an unnaturally painful position. i made a few minor adjustments and everything was fine. by the way i ride with specialized shoes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yupp, I do run, but not as much as I was. I have a very neutral gate, so I have normal pronation. I think the pain is pretty much on the outside ball of my foot, like you describe.

I am reluctant to move the cleats forward, I don't feel that I'll get as good of a power transfer that way. I like the cleats centered under the ball of my foot (like most do I guess).

How much did you move them up toward your toes?

thanks for the confirmation, I knew someone else out there HAD to have this problem!!
 

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cleat movement

i moved them just over 1/8th an inch. i didn't notice any difference in power transfer. they are barely forward, not all the way out on the toe like you may be thinking!
 

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Look's have the largest contact area of just about any pedal. The new Shimano's are close. So are speedplay. Your shoes might not fit your feet right. I've got a pair of Addais shoes with carbon soles, that cause my feet to have hot spots after an hour. With my Shimano carbons, I can ride all day.
You may need a different brand of shoe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was really hoping it wasn't the shoes, they are such a pain. You get new, try them, if you don't like them, there goes 150 bucks, and you can't return them, they are used.

Pedals you can resell on ebay or something, or just get cheap used ones to try before you invest in a new pair.

sigh, i've got some thinking to do. i may try moving my cleats up a little bit like brad suggested above.
 

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Try new insoles first, I use the exact same shoe and pedal combination. Very versatile, but I changed to Superfeet in the first week.
 

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Two other things to try

Before you sell your shoes or pedals, try moving the cleats BACK. This is the standard fix for hot spots - getting the ball of the foot a bit forward of the pedal axle.

Try a different set of insoles. You could get a pair of any number of athletic orthotics, swap some insoles from other shoes, Dr. Scholls, etc.

There is nothing inherently wrong with either your shoes or pedals, so it's worth experimenting a bit before giving up.
 

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I'm in agreement with bradnicholson

Moving the cleats forward 2 or 3 mm (~1/8") will not cause you to loose performance. I've found that the performance increased and definitely eliminated 'hot spots', even for rides >60 miles.. :cool:
 

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Agree with back

Kerry Irons said:
Before you sell your shoes or pedals, try moving the cleats BACK. This is the standard fix for hot spots - getting the ball of the foot a bit forward of the pedal axle.

Try a different set of insoles. You could get a pair of any number of athletic orthotics, swap some insoles from other shoes, Dr. Scholls, etc.

There is nothing inherently wrong with either your shoes or pedals, so it's worth experimenting a bit before giving up.
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Two years ago I was experiencing real bad hot spots and it got so bad that at times I had to stop and get off my bike. You're talking pain that made you whelp like a puppy. I thought it was my shoes, so I purchased a new pair of shoes and the pain was still there. I got on the internet and found a site about cycling foot injuries and it told you how to locate the ball of your foot (distal head of your first metatarsal bone)and locate the ball of your foot over your pedal spindle. I ended up moving my cleats BACK, almost as far back as they would go, then forward a couple of mm's. If you read the instructions that come with the Look cleats they tell you how to set them up. I never paid any attention to them. The ball of your foot over the pedal spindle is the neutral position. Before that I had my cleats set almost all the way forward. I pedal sort of flat footed, so the neutral position works best for me. If you try the ball of your foot method, then new foot beds and the pain is still there, then you can start thinking about new shoes. But I would start with the ball of your foot position first. Unless you wear 44.5 Sidi's, then buy new shoes and send the Sidi's to me.
 

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Switched from 356's to 206's

I switched from the same reasons you listed and I also have Sidi shoes. I have used Look pedals for years now, but the 356's felt like they were just too narrow a platform. Based on Doug's advice, I switched to the 206's and everything was fine.
 

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No way could it be the Look pedals.....

They have about the most adjustment of anything out there. I have had pain on the outside of the foot before and a wider shoe ( Northwave)along with the Peterson power beds saved me.
 
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