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So i've been riding a mountain bike all my life, but i've realized i've never actually been...mountain biking. I'm a college student by trade so bikes are everywhere on campus and the more i've been looking at the road bikes the more I want one.

So i'm trying to get informed on road bikes. I want one that's not expensive (cause its a college campus) but also something I could take on a longer ride if i felt like it.
Does anyone have recomendations? How bout what to look for in a used bike? Also, how do I know what size, i ride a 17" mtn but what does that mean in road bike?

Thanks for the help!!
 

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Best bet is to check several different bike shops. I say several because they don't all sell the same brands. One may sell Trek, Klein, etc. Another Giant, Specialized etc. find what you like. There are plenty of relatively low priced options out there. Good Luck.
 

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TECS said:
So i've been riding a mountain bike all my life, but i've realized i've never actually been...mountain biking. I'm a college student by trade so bikes are everywhere on campus and the more i've been looking at the road bikes the more I want one.

So i'm trying to get informed on road bikes. I want one that's not expensive (cause its a college campus) but also something I could take on a longer ride if i felt like it.
Does anyone have recomendations? How bout what to look for in a used bike? Also, how do I know what size, i ride a 17" mtn but what does that mean in road bike?

Thanks for the help!!
Deciding what kind of bike you want depends on how much money you want to spend. You could quite nicely for around a $1,000 - Trek, GT, LeMond, etc., all sell entry level bikes. One thing to remember - if you are going to use it primarily for transportation, look at touring or commuting bikes. No need to buy something to race on if you have no plans to race. A good touring bike will work just fine for longer rides and will also be usuable for hauling things around campus.
Proper sizing means proper measurement. Go to your local LBS and get fitted for a bike.
Finally, as you are on a college campus, invest in not one, but two good locks. Why two?
Well, get a solid bar lock to lock the frame to something secure, a bike rack etc. By the way, parking meters are a bad idea. A good thief will just lift the bike over it - lock and all. Second, get a cable lock to actually lock the bike, which means both wheels, etc. My son takes his seat with him when he goes to class. What you want to do with the locks is tell a thief that your bike is too much trouble, that he should move on to something else. Bicycling Magazine used to interview bike thiefs - there isn't a lock made they cannot defeat. But, they will move on if they decide it will take too long for them to steal a particular bike. They don't want to take too much time and attract attention.
Finally, something I always do with my bikes - write your name, address and phone number on a 3X5 card. Also write something like: "If Joe Jones did not bring this bike in for work, then it has been stolen. Please call ... " Laminate it. Put a string on it and then drop it down the tube where the seat goes. tape the string on the inside of the tube. In that way, if the bike is stolen, there is a chance a thief won't look there and an LBS will find it and return your bike to you. Good Luck
 

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TECS said:
So i've been riding a mountain bike all my life, but i've realized i've never actually been...mountain biking. I'm a college student by trade so bikes are everywhere on campus and the more i've been looking at the road bikes the more I want one.

So i'm trying to get informed on road bikes. I want one that's not expensive (cause its a college campus) but also something I could take on a longer ride if i felt like it.
Does anyone have recomendations? How bout what to look for in a used bike? Also, how do I know what size, i ride a 17" mtn but what does that mean in road bike?

Thanks for the help!!

Thoroughly. The questions you ask are all good ones, and as you might imagine have been covered 100 times.

For fitting, a good starting place is www.wrenchscience.com. It will describe how to measure yourself to get a sense of what might fit. But nothing beats the personal advice of someone at a good LBS.
 

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Cyclocross is way cooler than a touring bike!

Look up Cyclocross...

If somebody can figure out how to get this sport the marketing it deserves...

Basically, you have a good touring frame with decently strong (but still fairly light weight) wheels with wider ( but way narrower than mountain bike) tires and decent shifing components in a range that is really practical on the streets. Add on a road handlebar with multiple hand positions (so why add bar-ends to your MTB???) and it's utterly practical.

You go fast, and can handle potholes, road debris, snow, sand, gravel, and even off-road. When the terrain gets ridiculous for biking, you jump off and RUN. Many times, that's way faster than having a MTB and trying to ride up a cliff. Almost all cyclocross bikes have the braze-ons for touring racks and multiple waterbottles. It's absolutely the do-it-all bike setup.

So... how often does anyone use the 6 pounds of crappy suspension that I see hung on 90% of all campus bikes? Marketing. Well, 'Cross deserves it day. I suspect the market is not yet saturated with crappy MTBs.

'Meat
 
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