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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey guys, its week 2 with the new allez and i'm thinking i'm going to make the move to clipless pedals and shoes, i've never used a clipless set and I want to know what are some good brands of shoes and pedals :D
 

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I went to the store and tried on every pair of shoes they had from $65.00 to $580.00; ended up with a very comfortable Shimano R099 - 129.00. I am just amazed at how they feel like my running shoes. The pedals I chose were Speedplay because I've heard they are easier on a beginner's knees and easy to get out of, but then I watched a video on bike fitting that said you produce more "wattage" out of a pedal with zero play and the knee issues are due to not stretching enough most the time. So Speedplay Zero next time.
 

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pedals will come with cleats that you screw onto the bottom of your shoes. Most popular pedals companies use 3 hole cleats. most road shoes are compatible with 3 hole cleats. But mountain biking pedals/cleats will not work with 3 hole road shoes.

road cleats

road shoes


mountain biking cleats

mtb shoes


comprende?
 

· I like the BIG RING
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I use MTB

Hello,

I use Specialized MTB shoes with Shimano SPD pedals. Sure, they weigh more than road pedals, but if I need to lose weight, it's in the mid section, not footwear!:) Also, if in a senior moment, I forget something back in the house I can walk across the floor without my wife castrating me!:blush2:
I practiced clipping in and out while on the trainer and have only fallen over once, DUH! Since then, I always unclip at a reasonable distance before my projected stop, as clipping back in with SPD's is easy as they are double sided.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
rogerstg said:
I depends on the type of riding you do.
right now just casual riding trying to get back in shape but more serious latter I would like to also stay sub 250 for shoe and pedals but If it would really make a difference price I'll just save more and buy some later, don't really want to cheap out on the pedals if it means breaking my neck trying to get out of them
 

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In that case, get a pair of brand name SPD shoes in the $70-$90 range, and spd pedals for $50-$70. Double sided are a bit heavier, but make getting in after a stop easier. Set the tension so that you can get our easier.

FWIW, my GF uses this setup and rides about 130 miles weekly. I started that way, but went to Speedplay this year because my knees would start to bother me after about 20 miles.
 

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hollandbk said:
hey guys, its week 2 with the new allez and i'm thinking i'm going to make the move to clipless pedals and shoes, i've never used a clipless set and I want to know what are some good brands of shoes and pedals :D
Much depends on user preference, which you might not even know yet. I'll try to pose the questions and then you can try to state a preference and then folks can give you advice on good choices.

1) I want a shoe that is easy to walk around in off the bike vs I don't plan on being off the bike much, it does not matter.
2) I want a pedal with lots of float because they are easier on the legs vs I want a pedal with no float for that solid connection to the bike they give.
3) I like equipment the pros use vs I could care less what pro riders do
4) I like to corner hard, clearance matters vs I've never knocked a pedal on a turn in my life, what's this clearance you speak of.
5) I like a pedal with double sided entry (flats) vs I like a pedal with single sided entry (toe clips)

Some of the above have variations so it might be also helpful to state your degrees of preference for the extreames I state above in your reply.

Scot
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Scot_Gore said:
Much depends on user preference, which you might not even know yet. I'll try to pose the questions and then you can try to state a preference and then folks can give you advice on good choices.

1) I want a shoe that is easy to walk around in off the bike vs I don't plan on being off the bike much, it does not matter.
it would be nice to have shoes that I might be able to walk around in a little and not kill my feet but its not overly important since I wont really be commuting in this bike
2) I want a pedal with lots of float because they are easier on the legs vs I want a pedal with no float for that solid connection to the bike they give.
really don't know what my preference is here since i've never used a clip pedal before
3) I like equipment the pros use vs I could care less what pro riders do
I could care less what the pros use
4) I like to corner hard, clearance matters vs I've never knocked a pedal on a turn in my life, what's this clearance you speak of.
never knocked a pedal on a turn
5) I like a pedal with double sided entry (flats) vs I like a pedal with single sided entry (toe clips)
don't really care if its double sided

Some of the above have variations so it might be also helpful to state your degrees of preference for the extreames I state above in your reply.

Scot
I think i'm to go to the lbs to check some out any other brands you guys think I should keep in mind or avoid :D
 

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What they said...

...I guess the only thing I'd add is that get the shoes first, and think mostly about comfort, then worry about pedals next. As somebody noted, shoes are something you need to try on, and more $$$ doesn't necessarily equate to comfort. For example, my tennis coach got a pair of mid-level Performance road shoes that were very comfortable and I thought very well made and efficient.

When it comes to pedals, you have lots 'o' choices, although some pedals aren't compatible with some shoes. For example, I have foot problems (too many years in ski boots) so I just got a pair of Shimano custom fit R220s, a great shoe. They'll only work, I gather, with Shimano and Look pedals, which is fortunate because I use Look pedals.

For pedals, you're looking at a lot of different thingies, one of which is "How much platform does it have, and how much do you want?" I don't do well with pedals like Speedplay, which have a relatively small platform...I like something substantial like Look. On the other hand, with Speedplay (and most MTB pedals), you can enter on either side...which isn't true of Look pedals. Another reason I like Look pedals is the release tension is adjustable (also true of most pedals) and the float (how much they'll rotate laterally before starting to release) is also adjustable. I don't know why they did it, but in the Keo series, Look made the amount of float dependent on the cleats you use. I use Look CX-6, and with the same cleat, you can adjust float to 0, 3, 6, or 9 with a dial on the back of the pedal. As you start spending more $$ on pedals, you get lighter pedals, and better bearings, but even low to medium end pedals will probably serve you pretty well.

There's no way of knowing...although you can talk to people at the shop...but different people have (or do not have) problems getting in and out of some brands of pedals. I think it's just a getting used to thing, but getting in and out of Looks is easy for me, but I hate Shimanos...which I have on my mountain bike, which I only ride about once a summer...
 

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Shimano PD540's, and Specialized's Sport MTB shoes worked for me. The PD's are easy to get in and out of, don't look dorky(this is subjective, I know), and you're not out a ton of money with the shoes either.
 

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Another thing to maybe think about is how much time you might spend riding around in street shoes. Pedals with larger platforms (Shimano, Look, etc) will be better for the occasional errand compared to some other types.
 

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Pedals

I run Speedplay zero's as I found them the most comfortable and easily mounted/dismounted, but I do have a question for anyone else who runs them.....I have to replace the cleats about every three months. Does anyone know how to make the old work like new or why they stop working effectively? And what I mean by that is when they wear out I can't get my feet to dismount and end up heading to the ground at 0.5mph :cryin:
 

· Man, I'm Awesome
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If you like to get off your bike every now and then and be able to walk around you should get some mountain shoes and pedals. Mountain bike shoes have a recessed cleat so you can walk in them. The pedals just have a different type of clip to clip into.

I have a pair of Specialized Tahoe shoes


and a pair of shimano PD-A520 pedals


I really like being able to get somewhere and be able to walk around for a while. In road shoes you can't really walk, unless you like walking around on very slippery plastic like a duck.

And yes, this pedal/shoe combo is on my road bike.
 

· I like the BIG RING
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My Two Cents

I use these Specialized MTB shoes with Shimano M520 pedals. The pedals clip in on both sides and the shoes are very comfortable. I currently ride 75-100 miles per week, and have completed 2 centuries this year so far. No issues. :thumbsup:
 
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