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I have a really nice Schwinn Paramount from the early 80's. I would like to sell this item. But I need help identifying the Providence of the Bike. So if you guys can help me with this. And a reasonable price to sell this at. I would much appreciate it. Thanks for your time and help. Edward Reiter. Bicycle Wheel Crankset Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Bicycle frame
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Apparently if you pay $50 Waterford will give you a Provenance report on old Paramounts. Looking at the photos I get the impression that this frame was repainted. The top tube sticker does not look original. Are there any tubing stickers or model numbers on the frame?
 

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Why not post a few pics that help ID the bike. My guess is that it is worthless but that’s hard to confirm from this somewhat weird choice of pics. Maybe I’m way off base...

Campy components and Cinelli stamp on BB? Cinelli made Schwinn frames?


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Apologies if suspicion is unwarranted, but the internet being what it is ...

The odd selection of photos makes it obvious that the OP knows nothing about bikes.

Hmmmm.
 

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Apologies if suspicion is unwarranted, but the internet being what it is ...

The odd selection of photos makes it obvious that the OP knows nothing about bikes.

Hmmmm.
Maybe that's why he is here asking for help.
 

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Well, whatever it is, it looks like it is brand new. The parts would be worth something to someone looking for some old parts. For all you guys reminiscing about riding old bikes, here it is, go get it.
 

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Apparently if you pay $50 Waterford will give you a Provenance report on old Paramounts. Looking at the photos I get the impression that this frame was repainted. The top tube sticker does not look original. Are there any tubing stickers or model numbers on the frame?
Didn't Schwinn put the serial numbers on the rear dropout?
 

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Why not post a few pics that help ID the bike. My guess is that it is worthless but that’s hard to confirm from this somewhat weird choice of pics. Maybe I’m way off base...

Campy components and Cinelli stamp on BB? Cinelli made Schwinn frames?


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I don't think that Schwinn used Cinelli bottom brackets, but a Cinelli bottom bracket doesn't necessarily mean a Cinelli built bike. Cinelli sold lugs and bottom brackets on the open market for any frame builder to use.

And, yes, Campagnolo components were used on Paramount frames.

Whether that bike is a Schwinn or not it isn't worthless, the quality of those Campagnolo components ensures that.
 

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I don't think that Schwinn used Cinelli bottom brackets, but a Cinelli bottom bracket doesn't necessarily mean a Cinelli built bike. Cinelli sold lugs and bottom brackets on the open market for any frame builder to use.

And, yes, Campagnolo components were used on Paramount frames.

Whether that bike is a Schwinn or not it isn't worthless, the quality of those Campagnolo components ensures that.
Yes, those old Campy parts have value, no doubt. Maybe part then out on eBay for a year or two waiting for that buyer looking for that legacy part for a retro restore.

I’ve stopped collecting parts I’m not using or I’m not going to use and I decided a while ago that I didn’t want to be an eBay parts seller.

This bike has some limited value but it’s value is isolated to folks that know a lot about bikes, and retro old bikes especially. You are talking about a pretty small number of people. If you are patient and know the market, you have some value. If you are asking on this forum what it is you have in terms of value than you probably don’t have any.
 

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I don't think that Schwinn used Cinelli bottom brackets, but a Cinelli bottom bracket doesn't necessarily mean a Cinelli built bike. Cinelli sold lugs and bottom brackets on the open market for any frame builder to use.

And, yes, Campagnolo components were used on Paramount frames.

Whether that bike is a Schwinn or not it isn't worthless, the quality of those Campagnolo components ensures that.
There was a similar thread (Cinelli BB on Paramounts) on Bike Forums. The addition of a Cinelli BB and new looking paint suggest the frame was repaired and repainted
 

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Did you look for a serial number?
 

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Why not post a few pics that help ID the bike. My guess is that it is worthless but that’s hard to confirm from this somewhat weird choice of pics. Maybe I’m way off base...

Campy components and Cinelli stamp on BB? Cinelli made Schwinn frames?


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The Paramount is a top of the line frame that would be appropriately outfitted with Campy, in this case Super Record, the best, hands down, what the pros rode. If Schwinn didn't build it, the bike shop or buyer would have chosen the components.

The paint job looks suspiciously different than the standard of the time. But that component group is golden, a sign of authenticity. I'd guess some aficionado might spend up to a grand on the package, the weird frame paint job being the only caveat. It's value may go up in a few more years. Agree with above, more money selling the frame and components by themselves.
 

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Uh, the Paramount is a top of the line frame that would be outfitted with Campy, in this case Super Record, the best, hands down. If Schwinn didn't build it, the bike shop or buyer would have chosen the components, as with all top of the line bike sales {back in the days of threaded BBs. 27.2 mm seat posts]. The components are what the pros rode.
You sound confident. You should buy it immediately! I’m sure you will get a good deal it’s resale will be astronomical because it’s a verified classic frame. Go for it right now!

And 5 years from now, when you still have parts around and eBay listings that are so old people can’t access them anymore because they are in some antique IOS or app. Go for it!

If you are niche seller/buyer and have space and patience and do this as a living or time sucking side hustle, go for it. There is a place for this, as I’ve said, but it’s hanging with a micro fraction of serious retro interested cyclists. Do you want to build up a friction shifting 24 lb bike in 2022? I’m with the other 6 billion people on earth and I wouldn’t touch it but for scraps as a fun side project on the cheap.


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You sound confident. You should buy it immediately! I’m sure you will get a good deal it’s resale will be astronomical because it’s a verified classic frame. Go for it right now!

And 5 years from now, when you still have parts around and eBay listings that are so old people can’t access them anymore because they are in some antique IOS or app. Go for it!

If you are niche seller/buyer and have space and patience and do this as a living or time sucking side hustle, go for it. There is a place for this, as I’ve said, but it’s hanging with a micro fraction of serious retro interested cyclists. Do you want to build up a friction shifting 24 lb bike in 2022? I’m with the other 6 billion people on earth and I wouldn’t touch it but for scraps as a fun side project on the cheap.


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Sure, if you're obsessed with fashion, riding the latest tech that impresses your riding buddies. No way I'd spend ten thousand bucks on a carbon frame with 12 speed in back and one in front, battery operated shifting, hydraulic brakes. and now little motor assists! Is it a car or a bike?

That's a Cinelli bottom bracket shell, investment cast, stiff as hell. The crank won't loosen up. The lugged steel frame will climb like a bandit, despite the weight. Don't forget, steel is still real and maintains an elite market of riders in the know! They get in line for a Richard Sachs and wait months to get one! Youtube is full of videos of guys lovingly rehabilitating those old lugged steel frames, most of them mid range bikes in their day, albeit with modern drive trains, so there's nothing to sneeze at. Paramounts had great reputations, if they never fully overcame their Schwinn moniker.

24 pounds? A light weight gravel bike! Weight is irrelevant, well compensated for by crash worthiness. Those frames didn't break. They're keepers. If OP doesn't get a whole lot of money for it, at least he's passing along a classic that will make someone very happy. Don't knock the good stuff. The rear derailleur might be early Super Record or Nuovo Record, the preceding group. Bullet proof. If you raced, you used Campy. Nothing else came close.
 

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You know, there is a Paramount community out there (Called "Chicago Schwinns", if I remember correctly), and if you really want a verifiable answer, you should be asking there rather than at a couple of 'generalist' boards. Certainly you can't expect to get a decent answer over at Bike Forums.....
 

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Sure, if you're obsessed with fashion, riding the latest tech that impresses your riding buddies. No way I'd spend ten thousand bucks on a carbon frame with 12 speed in back and one in front, battery operated shifting, hydraulic brakes. and now little motor assists! Is it a car or a bike?

That's a Cinelli bottom bracket shell, investment cast, stiff as hell. The crank won't loosen up. The lugged steel frame will climb like a bandit, despite the weight. Don't forget, steel is still real and maintains an elite market of riders in the know! They get in line for a Richard Sachs and wait months to get one! Youtube is full of videos of guys lovingly rehabilitating those old lugged steel frames, most of them mid range bikes in their day, albeit with modern drive trains, so there's nothing to sneeze at. Paramounts had great reputations, if they never fully overcame their Schwinn moniker.

24 pounds? A light weight gravel bike! Weight is irrelevant, well compensated for by crash worthiness. Those frames didn't break. They're keepers. If OP doesn't get a whole lot of money for it, at least he's passing along a classic that will make someone very happy. Don't knock the good stuff. The rear derailleur might be early Super Record or Nuovo Record, the preceding group. Bullet proof. If you raced, you used Campy. Nothing else came close.
What makes one frame climb better than another if they are of equal weight?


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What makes one frame climb better than another if they are of equal weight?


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Resilient CRMO tubes joined together with rock solid investment cast lugs, climb like bandits! The tubes flex with each pedal stroke just enough to soften the blows, then bounce back to meet the next pedal stroke, a faithful partner. Find the rhythm the legs can handle, and it climbs like motor assist. All you have to think about is heart rate! Stand up, rock that baby back and forth, and it purrs, "Yes! Give it to me, sweetheart! Harder! Man up!"


Weight, 80% the rider, against the relentless vertical force of gravity is easily overcome by taking a piss. The key is "modulus of elasticity" unique to steel, that carbon tech has struggled to equal for 30 years. It'll never achieve all properties of steel, strength, comfort, reliability, the three properties that steel really shines, perfect for a manual instrument of two wheeled propulsion. Carbon tech can be engineered to meet two of these properties, but never all three. There will always be compromises. I'm sure there are light weight carbon frames that climb really well, but how many will be around in 20 years?
 
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