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This bike just got dropped off at my church rummage sale. Can anyone help me out with what I am looking at? Are there any other pictures that would be helpful?


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This bike just got dropped off at my church rummage sale. Can anyone help me out with what I am looking at? Are there any other pictures that would be helpful?


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Bike was built late 70s, probably. Simplex rear derailleurs were common on mid level road bikes, just before Shimano came out with its "600EX" group around '80.

The 3 main tube are Reynolds 531, top of the line butted tubing of the time, but the lugs are stamped, not "cold forged" and no doubt machine brazed, looking at the lug in the pix of the shifters, which looks like it could be coming apart from rust built up in the badly brazed joint. The fork blades, chain stays and seat stays are probably straight gauge "hi tensile steel," heavier and not as responsive. The bike sold for around $300-400. You could buy a top of the line frame for $600 and a full Campy equipped bike for $1200-1400 back then.

It might be fun to restore, but it probably has oddball French threaded BB and headset. It also might have 27" rims, but probably 700C. 27" rims have been obsolete since the 80s, so the selection of replacement tires is limited. The other components were pretty much standard. Parts are still available. I fixed up a cherry Schwinn that had lived in a pawn shop forever, with the same tubing and equivalent component package, put a pair of new tires on, and gave it to a teenage kid. He preferred it to my custom Columbus SLX bike, hand brazed with nice stiff investment cast lugs. It was plenty stiff when climbing, not quite as quick to respond as the SLX, but you got what you paid for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bike was built late 70s, probably. Simplex rear derailleurs were common on mid level road bikes, just before Shimano came out with its "600EX" group around '80.

The 3 main tube are Reynolds 531, top of the line butted tubing of the time, but the lugs are stamped, not "cold forged" and no doubt machine brazed, looking at the lug in the pix of the shifters, which looks like it could be coming apart from rust built up in the badly brazed joint. The fork blades, chain stays and seat stays are probably straight gauge "hi tensile steel," heavier and not as responsive. The bike sold for around $300-400. You could buy a top of the line frame for $600 and a full Campy equipped bike for $1200-1400 back then.

It might be fun to restore, but it probably has oddball French threaded BB and headset. It also might have 27" rims, but probably 700C. 27" rims have been obsolete since the 80s, so the selection of replacement tires is limited. The other components were pretty much standard. Parts are still available. I fixed up a cherry Schwinn that had lived in a pawn shop forever, with the same tubing and equivalent component package, put a pair of new tires on, and gave it to a teenage kid. He preferred it to my custom Columbus SLX bike, hand brazed with nice stiff investment cast lugs. It was plenty stiff when climbing, not quite as quick to respond as the SLX, but you got what you paid for.
So, bottom line, would it be worth dropping $100 on for a nice project bike to tinker with and keep for casual riding?


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Bike was built late 70s, probably.
my guess is '77 or '78.

the op should search those peugeot catalogues and also try to lookup the serial number and/or component date codes.

The 3 main tube are Reynolds 531, top of the line butted tubing of the time
this puts it below the px10 and in the pr10 or pkn10 level of peugeots.

looking at the lug in the pix of the shifters, which looks like it could be coming apart from rust built up in the badly brazed joint.
i wouldn't worry about that at all. maybe it's rust under the paint, but 9.999/10, it's nothing to worry about. since the paint is black, you can sand away any rusty blemishes and then seamlessly fill with enamel in a black satin or similar.

It might be fun to restore, but it probably has oddball French threaded BB and headset.
no problem. he likely won't need to replace either anyway. if you do need to replace the bb or headset, look up a bike co-op in your area before going off to ebay.

the biggest issue for me is the derailleur hanger. often, these peugeots don't have a stop piece to allow a campy or suntour derailleur, and you're left with simplex. if the derailleur needs replacement, the nice simplex stuff on ebay is really expensive. people have modified the hangers, too.

the other issue is the pedals. they could be french thread. if the pedal axles read "d" and "g" instead of "l" and "r," they're french threaded. either way, the left (non drive side) pedal is always reverse threaded. lyotard pedals should be rebuilt like the rest of the bike. it's easy.

It also might have 27" rims, but probably 700C.
either is fine. good tires are available in both sizes.

27" rims have been obsolete since the 80s.
not "obsolete." sun still makes 27" rims for vintage bikes just like this. but if new rims are needed, 700c is preferred.

if the bike just needs all new consumables (tubes, tires, bar tape, cables and housing), the parts will run $70-100. tools to overhaul the bike yourself should cost less than that, so it's definitely worth doing.

if the frame is straight and the paint is good, you can sell a fully overhauled bike like this in a big market for around $400 or more this time of year. it should retain its value fairly well.

i've rebuilt two peugeots like this. both worked out great. the '74, i sold for over $700. the '80 i sold for over $400.
 

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Great info! There was a shim or washer that had a detente on it that would adapt Simplex derailleurs to standard dropouts I seem to remember. They're probably still around. Velo Orange would know about that.

Do you think OP could get bike for a nominal $35-50?

The bike has no value to the owner. He hasn't ridden it in years and is one step away from throwing it away. He's "donating" it to a church rummage sale, presumably to raise money for charity. So whatever money the bike earns is a contribution to charity, not payment to the original owner. If it were at a garage sale it would be lucky to get $15-20. Collectors bid prices higher, but this bike is no cherry. $100. is generous for this bike in the condition its in, IMO.
 

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... adapt Simplex derailleurs to standard dropouts...
interesting, but not an issue for this peugeot.

Do you think OP could get bike for a nominal $35-50?
don't know, but in its current state, it is certainly worth about $100 or less.

with a new wheelset, it would be a really nice riding bike, i imagine. i'd rebuild the hubs on new sun rims and get some kool stops for those mafac center-pulls ($20ish on ebay).

i hate simplex dt shifters with a five speed. the throw is just too long. i'd spread the frame to 126mm (with a 2x4) and use a new 6-speed sunrace freewheel. that will greatly improve the shifting.
 

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looking at the pic, the pedals should probably be tossed as they're unserviceable (i.e., you cannot remove the dust caps and rebuild them).

if they're french thread, this would be a setback for the project, as good french pedals are fairly expensive unless you have a good bike co-op in your area.

as 1980 approached, peugeot was moving more to standard practices, so the pedals could be standard thread, which would allow you to use japanese pedals.
 
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