Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,644 Posts
DanceDropDie said:
Well I've been looking to shed some weight off my bike. So far I have everything stock as listed here :http://www.bianchiusa.com/05_eros.html

Where should I start in shedding off weight?
lighter wheels is probably the best place to start

maybe a compact crankset instead of the triple.

even just some lighter wheels (depending on what kind of surfaces you ride on)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,627 Posts
Time machine? People don't generally buy a Reynolds 631 steel frame with a triple crankset and Alex wheels in the first place if they're thinking about saving weight. But given what you have, if you've got the money lighter wheels might actually make the bike "feel" lighter.

However, even your current wheels are not crazy heavy. According to Weight Weenies, they come in at about 1720 grams. So getting lighter wheels will cost you. You could go to a place like Excel Sports and put together a custom set with DT Swiss hubs and rims, spokes. That would be 1650 grams and cost you $515. That saves you only 70 grams, or about .15 pounds. Or you could go to someplace like Williams Wheels and get the 30s (1520 grams) for $479.

You could probably sell the Alex wheels on eBay for $125, so subtract that from your cost. But you might want to keep an extra wheelset around for emergencies.

$515 is nearly half the retail price of your Eros. That's why it's smarter to pay as much as you possibly can for a complete new bike if you want weight savings.

You can start with ultra-light tires and inner tubes, though, if you want to do it on the cheap. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Yep, a lighter wheelset and some folding bead tires is a great place to start. Also, the Mirage components are pretty heavy, so as suggested above, maybe switching out that heavy triple for a compact double (Campy shifters will work fine with the current front derailleur since they are friction for the front).

BTW-Campy compatible wheelsets are sometimes harder to find, but Wheels Manufacturing makes Campy spaced 9 speed cassettes that work on Shimano compatible wheelsets.
 

·
Banned forever.....or not
Joined
·
24,573 Posts
If you really want a lighter load to pedal, you're got to either loose the Bianchi eros, or loose 5 pounds of body weight. Loosing the body weight, is a lot cheaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,671 Posts
not to sound rude or anything, but changing some components on that frame is a bit like putting lipstick on a pig. You'll spend a lot per gram that way. Better bet if you're interested in light is to start with a lighter frame/fork.
 

·
Frog Whisperer
Joined
·
41,515 Posts
I ride a 2002 eros frame......full Veloce drive train and brakes, Michelin pro-race2, steel fork, triple, Brooks saddle, Brooks tape....Mavic 32 spoke on veloce hubs....what does it weigh?.......20...21?...so what, I care not....

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=134395

I have lighter bikes, I have heavier bikes.......it's all about the engine....and fwiw....at 5 foot 10, 120 pounds....go eat!....you need more meat......what the he11 you using for fuel?

btw...the Eros decal will scrape off.....then it is just another bianchi......
 

·
Satanic Watch Winder
Joined
·
4,897 Posts
30K on an Eros

Bought new in 1996. Factory saddle and post were landfill when new. In 1998 had Velocity Aeroheads with Record hubs built because the factory rims were cracking along the spoke eyelets. Probably eliminated 400 grams at $.82 per gram.

Forget "upgrading" from Mirage. My Mirage 8 stuff is 12 years old and works like new. The shifters get a shot of ProLink every spring and I wrap them in plastic food wrap if I carry the bike long distances on the back of a car. I've had Chorus 10 shifters on another bike for four years and they've been re-built twice. Unless the Italians have forgotten how to make steel, I wouldn't bother swapping out the fork for carbon like I did. Another waste of money.

Even though it's speed is limited only by the rider, an Eros is not designed to be a crit bike. I've had mine on a trainer and found BB sway to be almost nil and I can't make the brakes rub when out of the saddle ( and I run them close ). At the end of the day, you could spend the price of the bike and not drop it's weight by two pounds. Enjoy it for what it is. One of the best "all day" bikes of the last 20 years.

LOOKs come and go but, my Eros stays
 

·
Frog Whisperer
Joined
·
41,515 Posts
oily666 said:
Unless the Italians have forgotten how to make steel, I wouldn't bother swapping out the fork for carbon like I did. Another waste of money.
fwiw, the '05 had a carbon fork from the factory. My '02 was the last year they had steel if I am not mistaken
One of the best "all day" bikes of the last 20 years.
I have to agree....mine is indeed, incredibly comfortable....all day....and the next day...all day and the next..........all day.....................

I've lost track of the miles on her, I could figure it out but I'm not going to...I do know it's in excess of 15,000 miles.

Bottom line, if you want a lighter bike, by all means do what you can or get a new one, but I would HIGHLY recommend keeping the Bianchi....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
MR_GRUMPY said:
If you really want a lighter load to pedal, you're got to either loose the Bianchi eros, or loose 5 pounds of body weight. Loosing the body weight, is a lot cheaper.
It can be cheaper!
My gym membership and trainer cost a fortune this winter! :D
But I'm lighter and more fit than ever.

In the grand scheme of things, better long term than a 2nd Cervelo...
 

·
Shirtcocker
Joined
·
60,886 Posts
DanceDropDie said:
Well I've been looking to shed some weight off my bike. So far I have everything stock as listed here :http://www.bianchiusa.com/05_eros.html

Where should I start in shedding off weight?
I wouldn't knock yourself out (I have an Eros as a second bike BTW). Probably cheaper to just buy a new bike in the long run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I would get a new frame - cheapest and best solution. Keep the frame if you want. Not trying to sell on here, but as an example, I have an '01 Schwinn Factory Fastback frame (USA-made alu - their best) that is pretty damn light with a Reynolds Ouzo Pro fork on it I'd let go for $300. Perfect size for you, compact geo.

Plenty of deals like this are around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I have an '02 Imola which is pretty similar. Eventually I may get something lighter but will keep this for long rides as it is pretty comfy. It will be a while before the bike is holding me back anyway. I bought this used to introduce myself to more road riding and to help prepare for longer mountain bike races.

You won't get the kind of parts deals a manufacturer does on a new bike so if a vastly lighter bike is the goal it pays to buy a complete.
 

·
Registered
Escorted from the White House
Joined
·
38,735 Posts
One cheap an' easy thing to do is to saw off any excess seatpost. You really don't need any more than 2 1/2 to 3 inches in the frame.

I saved a couple of ounces this way, and it "don't hardly cost nuthin' ". :D

Beyond that, I'd focus a lot more on shedding rotating weight (tires, rims) than static.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top