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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was riding a 2014 Ridley Fenix with 10sp 105, but it was wrecked. I'm looking for a replacement.

The Fenix served me well, I was real happy with it. In fact if you know anyone stocking them, I'd consider just buying another.

That being said, I might as well shop around and see what my options are.

The bike has to be something I can use for group rides, as well as commuting and touring with frame bags (No racks). Here are my requirements:

* Bike must be available in 61CM / XL, I'm 6'4
* Needs to be rugged...it'll get 200-300 miles per week and carry no less than 200lbs. I'll be riding it 7 days a week. 5-10 miles of gravel / very mild off roading per week as well.
* 11sp shimano 105 or better
* Preference for aluminum and other alloys, as the bike will be used for ultralight touring using a setup similar to this
* Carbon forks and bars are fine though.
* I prefer endurance geometry over pure race geometry
* Part of me wants to go with a more aero road bike than the Fenix and see if I feel faster

What do you think would be a good fit for me? I have Trek and Specialized shops nearby, as well as dealers stocking Cannondale, Ridley and Fuji.
 

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Forget the aero business. It doesn't make any real difference and no aero bikes would come even close to be of any use for light touring or accept the tires you'd want for gravel riding.

What is your budget? Custom steel or ti is the obvious answer to your question but that's pricey.
 

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Check out the Jamis Renegade series. The top 2 models are carbon but the 3 under that are steel. The Exploit is the 105 steel bike that probably makes the most sense. Unlike many adventure bikes it performs as well on the roads as off and it's loaded mounts to attach everything.

Specialized just announced a new model with an old name the Sequoia. On paper it also sounds like something that would suit you. It's midway between a Roubaix and a Diverge according to the description. Hard to know how soon it will be available though
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Forget the aero business. It doesn't make any real difference and no aero bikes would come even close to be of any use for light touring or accept the tires you'd want for gravel riding.

What is your budget? Custom steel or ti is the obvious answer to your question but that's pricey.
The type of gravel riding I do is mild enough I don't need special tires. 25mm slicks handle it just fine.

Budget is 2k. I want something built more for speed than anything. Purpose built touring bikes are typically overbuilt for the type of touring I do, and a compact double provides all the gearing I need even in elevation.

Also I tend to ride at a decent pace, which is why part of me was thinking aero. My commute is 15 miles and takes 38-45 minutes usually, for example.


Check out the Jamis Renegade series. The top 2 models are carbon but the 3 under that are steel. The Exploit is the 105 steel bike that probably makes the most sense. Unlike many adventure bikes it performs as well on the roads as off and it's loaded mounts to attach everything


Looks like a fun bike. I'd prefer something lighter though. My Ridley was about 20lbs even, and if anything I'd like to shed weight. Also the widest tires I'm likely to use is 25....maybe 28's, so I don't need clearance quite that wide.
 

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Soma Smoothie ES, Prestige welded steel.

Handles up to a 32mm tire or 28's with fenders. Has eyelets if you ever need them. Laid back road bike designed for mild off road and light touring as needed, so builds up lighter then a touring bike. Uses long reach 57mm side pull brakes.

About $600 for the frame and fork, leaves money for components.

Any parts salvageable from the Ridley ?. Anything re-usable can save you some money, brakes, h-bar, seat, wheels - though you might need a new rear wheel if the old one wasn't 11 speed compatable.,
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Soma Smoothie ES, Prestige welded steel.

Handles up to a 32mm tire or 28's with fenders. Has eyelets if you ever need them. Laid back road bike designed for mild off road and light touring as needed, so builds up lighter then a touring bike. Uses long reach 57mm side pull brakes.

About $600 for the frame and fork, leaves money for components.

Any parts salvageable from the Ridley ?. Anything re-usable can save you some money, brakes, h-bar, seat, wheels - though you might need a new rear wheel if the old one wasn't 11 speed compatable.,

I'm not 100% that they're salvageable, but there's a chance I can use my seatpost, seat, pedals, tires, brakes and fork. The fork is carbon and the frame was destroyed in a head on impact, so I'm going to have to give it a really thorough inspection. Frame is trashed, front wheel pretty bent, shifters no good and bars took some damage.

Rear wheel, cogs and chain were 10 speed so doubt I'll have any immediate need for them, but if they still work I'll hold on to them. They had a lot of miles anyways so I'd like a fresh set.

I saw a Ridley Fenix 11 speed with ultegra group for about 1150. I think that's my current pick, but after checking out those Ti frames I'm kind of intruiged by them. Gonna keep poking around and see if I can find some Ti frames for a lower price.
 

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You will never find anything Ti with a budget of $2,000.

I'm getting mixed messages as to what you really want.

You say you want something for touring, but you want something light and fast.

You say you prefer an endurance frame, but you want something aero.

Too many contradictions to recommend something. My advice would be to visit some reputable bike shops and test ride some bikes to find out what you really want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
You will never find anything Ti with a budget of $2,000.

I'm getting mixed messages as to what you really want.

You say you want something for touring, but you want something light and fast.

You say you prefer an endurance frame, but you want something aero.

Too many contradictions to recommend something. My advice would be to visit some reputable bike shops and test ride some bikes to find out what you really want.
Ok, well people were suggesting Ti when I listed my budget as 2k. I've never bought a Ti bike so I wouldn't know.

The touring I do is ultralight touring with an emphasis on speed. i.e. most people carry 40-60lbs of gear when they do and do 50 mile days with 1 rest day a week. I bring 8-11lbs of gear, do 100-150 mile days, and don't take rest days. So I'm going to use this bike to tour, but the type of touring is going to emphasize speed and covering large amounts of ground per day.

I do long rides which is why I prefer endurance frames. But as a noob to road bikes I was wondering if aero would benefit me, since I'm typically riding over 20mph regardless of what type of ride I'm doing.

I have tested out a lot of bikes, but a 5 mile test ride isn't enough to tell me if aero is worth anything to me at all.

I know my requirements are odd, but I don't find them contradictory. These requirements are based on how I used my last Ridley, and it handled all this just fine. People told me I couldn't tour on it, and I did over 2.5k touring miles on it last year. *shrug*

Same with the commuting part. When most people here commuting bike, they think rack, bags, fenders, upright seat positiin etc., but thats not me. I setup my bike the same for my commute as I would a group ride. I go fast and hard. Clearance for 30mm+ tires and mounts for fenders and racks don't mean anything to me because I'll never use them.
 

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Ok, well people were suggesting Ti when I listed my budget as 2k. I've never bought a Ti bike so I wouldn't know.

The touring I do is ultralight touring with an emphasis on speed. i.e. most people carry 40-60lbs of gear when they do and do 50 mile days with 1 rest day a week. I bring 8-11lbs of gear, do 100-150 mile days, and don't take rest days. So I'm going to use this bike to tour, but the type of touring is going to emphasize speed and covering large amounts of ground per day.

I do long rides which is why I prefer endurance frames. But as a noob to road bikes I was wondering if aero would benefit me, since I'm typically riding over 20mph regardless of what type of ride I'm doing.

I have tested out a lot of bikes, but a 5 mile test ride isn't enough to tell me if aero is worth anything to me at all.

I know my requirements are odd, but I don't find them contradictory. These requirements are based on how I used my last Ridley, and it handled all this just fine. People told me I couldn't tour on it, and I did over 2.5k touring miles on it last year. *shrug*

Same with the commuting part. When most people here commuting bike, they think rack, bags, fenders, upright seat positiin etc., but thats not me. I setup my bike the same for my commute as I would a group ride. I go fast and hard. Clearance for 30mm+ tires and mounts for fenders and racks don't mean anything to me because I'll never use them.
OK then. It sounds like you could probably get away with a day pack on a Topeak Beam Rack which clamps around the seat post. Only requirement there is seat post must NOT be carbon. I don't consider what you do as touring, so that was the confusion. So a road bike it is.

If you do 100-150 mile days, you will most likely want an endurance type frame, not a race frame. If you decide at some point that you want to be more aero, you can always invert your stem or move the spacers on your headset to get a lower more aggressive position. This is easier than trying to get a more relaxed position on a race bike if you are finding a race bike is too harsh on longer rides.

Some endurance road bikes are:

Cannondale Synapse
Giant Defy
Trek Domaine
Specialized Roubaix

Just to name a few.
 

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You might check out Volagi. They make some nice bikes that are designed to do what you are doing.

Volagi Cycles | Endurance Bicycles and Components

The Liscio is their carbon frame that leans leans more towards 'fast road bike', where the Viaje is steel or Ti, and a little more endurance oriented.

Depending on the build, they are a little over your budget, but might be worth considering.

They are both available in various builds, or as a frame.

Norco also has a nice line of road and adventure bikes, and are good bang for the buck. You aren't paying for a big name, and can usually get better components for less money with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
OK then. It sounds like you could probably get away with a day pack on a Topeak Beam Rack which clamps around the seat post. Only requirement there is seat post must NOT be carbon. I don't consider what you do as touring, so that was the confusion. So a road bike it is.
I don't like seatpost mounted racks, tried them. This is the setup I use: https://i.imgur.com/QfhITN3.jpg

This is why in my original post I provided that link and specified no carbon seat posts, because even though its just a frame bag, I wouldn't want to hang 5lbs of gear off a carbon post not designed with that in mind.

So with 9-11lbs in fabric frame bags you can see why I don't need or want a "proper touring bike." I can sacrifice some of the ruggedness typically found in a touring frame for speed and lightness usually found in a proper road bike.

If you do 100-150 mile days, you will most likely want an endurance type frame, not a race frame. If you decide at some point that you want to be more aero, you can always invert your stem or move the spacers on your headset to get a lower more aggressive position. This is easier than trying to get a more relaxed position on a race bike if you are finding a race bike is too harsh on longer rides.
I inverted the stem and removed the spacers on my Ridley Fenix. That combined with other aero-based changes improved my speeds, which is why I thought maybe using an aero frame would also prove beneficial.

Some endurance road bikes are:

Cannondale Synapse
Giant Defy
Trek Domaine
Specialized Roubaix

Just to name a few.
I've tested all of those out besides the Defy. I likd how the cannondale felt second best compared to the Ridley I ended up with.
 
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