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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Peeps
Getting lower back pain after bout 30-40 mins of riding seems to be mostly on the left side.
tried a few adjustments with no results. Seems to be the harder I hammer the worse the
pain gets,not to the point where I have to stop but slows me down.:confused:
Any help would be appreciated:thumbsup:
 

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I don't get any pain while riding,. but sometimes I will feel stiff after. I have some sort of issue with my back, if I have to bend over and use back muscles to support myself. If I can use my hands for support, as in going to the drops, it doesn't bother me.

I'm sure there are people who could fill in volumes here on back exercise recommendations, etc. I even went to a PT who gave me a bunch of exercises, but they took up too much time for the benefit I was getting. I'll put up with the annoyance. The issue to determine is whether it is muscular or skeletal (like a disk problem). I'm pretty sure my problem is muscular, and it sounds like yours is too, unless it bothers you constantly, and gives a sharp stabbing pain.
 

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A few suggestions

spin easier gears
lower saddle a little bit
shorter stem or higher rise if the pain comes from reaching to the bars
longer stem or lower rise if the pain comes from road shock
strengthen core muscles
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I hate core exercises

spin easier gears
lower saddle a little bit
shorter stem or higher rise if the pain comes from reaching to the bars
longer stem or lower rise if the pain comes from road shock
strengthen core muscles[/QUOTE]

Thanx guys I'll try some of those and hope she gets better....its definitly a muscle
problem, my back rarely bothers me otherwise:thumbsup:
 

· classiquesklassieker
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Kerry Irons said:
So, you hate the solution to your problem? Core strengthening is the answer, or you can continue to suffer the pain. Your choice :)
I just posted this in another thread, but somehow this is also relevant to any question regarding back/neck/shoulder/arm pains in general.

Here you go:

Hate to tell you this, but this may be a case of "too much too soon". Beginners tend to tense up when they ride their bikes because they are not used to the riding position yet. Many factors play into comfort/pain. Basically you need good posture, good "attitude", and good support. All three are tied together, and depends on having good bike fit, good core strength, and just plain getting used to riding a bicycle.

People will now start throwing suggestions like "more upright", "push your saddle aft", and "shorter stem". None of this adds to comfort in general. There is a natural position that is different for every person, at different levels of exertion, but you won't even get to considering this unless you are used to riding a road bike in its general posture in the first place.

I would say that your best bet is to find a club or buddy to ride with, and watch him/her and ask for advice. And don't forget that really small things can make a huge difference, including handlebar width, the tilt/angle of your shifters, the angle of your saddle, etc. If I don't ride my bike for a long period of time, upon returning to riding I too have small pains in my neck, back, etc., and having learned to diagnose myself, all of it comes from simply being tense on the bike. This is what I meant by good "attitude". Even the most expensive so-called "Pro" fit can't help me in that case! A good fit is a good starting point, so check on that, but most people have to then make small adjustments.

So keep at it, learn to self-diagnose, and be open-minded. Who knows, maybe the pain will just go away once you get used to riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
orange_julius said:
I just posted this in another thread, but somehow this is also relevant to any question regarding back/neck/shoulder/arm pains in general.

Here you go:

Hate to tell you this, but this may be a case of "too much too soon". Beginners tend to tense up when they ride their bikes because they are not used to the riding position yet. Many factors play into comfort/pain. Basically you need good posture, good "attitude", and good support. All three are tied together, and depends on having good bike fit, good core strength, and just plain getting used to riding a bicycle.

People will not start throwing suggestions like "more upright", "push your saddle aft", and "shorter stem". None of this adds to comfort in general. There is a natural position that is different for every person, at different levels of exertion, but you won't even get to considering this unless you are used to riding a road bike in its general posture in the first place.

I would say that your best bet is to find a club or buddy to ride with, and watch him/her and ask for advice. And don't forget that really small things can make a huge difference, including handlebar width, the tilt/angle of your shifters, the angle of your saddle, etc. If I don't ride my bike for a long period of time, upon returning to riding I too have small pains in my neck, back, etc., and having learned to diagnose myself, all of it comes from simply being tense on the bike. This is what I meant by good "attitude". Even the most expensive so-called "Pro" fit can't help me in that case! A good fit is a good starting point, so check on that, but most people have to then make small adjustments.

So keep at it, learn to self-diagnose, and be open-minded. Who knows, maybe the pain will just go away once you get used to riding.
Yes I have new bike and have been friggin' with 3 seats for the past couple weeks, so dialing in is sketchy with diff seat thicknesses/fore/aft positions, I'll keep at it till it works.:thumbsup: I've been riding for 10 years but new bike = new problems
 

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reality based biking....

sorry for the weird title, I just wanted to point out that there is another perspective on this. Here it is:

Medical data tells us that most of us will suffer some sort of back problem in our lives. Man, let that sink in. One of the things which we can do to provoke them is exerting while in a bent-over position. Your symptoms are classic back problem. Just like mine.

Many people do not recognize early manifestation of back issues. We like to think about the back "injury" as being similar to the injuries we have in other parts of our bodies, like slightly pulled muscles, tendon inflammation, etc. But it ain't necessarily so. We think that the back symptom is muscular, a tweak or twinge, or something else temporary. Well the symptoms might go away, but it isn't gone.

Try the suggested lower seat, higher/less extended stem. And in daily like, stop bending over at the waist. Bend your knees. Try to keep your back straight. It sounds unusual, may feel unusual, but it could extend your back's service life.
 
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