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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The oversize length head tube on my Bianchi Intenso is proving to be problematic. It is 200mm and although my setup is almost identical to my former racing bike, I do not feel like I can get low enough when in a paceline.

My stem is pretty much "slammed" with the exception of a 4mm steel spacer which I assumed was part of the FSA Orbit C-40-ACB headset. I have 10mm of carbon spacers above the stem.

I am considering moving this 4mm steel spacer above the stem, with the 10mm carbon spacer on top of that. That would put my stem down another 4mm directly on top of the conical 15mm upper bearing cover.

Any concerns folks can think of not having the 4mm steel spacer between bottom of stem and the top surface of the upper bearing cover? Fwiw, I don't see this 4mm steel spacer anywhere in the headset diagrams. Came with the stem?
 

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You can run the stem directly on top of the bearing dust cover. You can probably get a super low profile dust cover for your particular headset to go even lower. Wont cause any problems
 

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すし + Sweet Potato Kugel
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I'm missing something here. The head tube on you model is as spec 1.1/8”- 1.5” A 200mm head tube is over 7 inches, almost 8.

Could you clarify this for me?

Here are the specs of your bike here.

2016 Bianchi Intenso Ultegra | ABC Bikes
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Eretz, the length of the head tube is 200mm. Most racing bicycles in my size would have head tubes 20mm or more less than that. My mistake for buying a considered "endurance racing", when I am most familiar riding true racing machines.
 

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The oversize length head tube on my Bianchi Intenso is proving to be problematic. It is 200mm and although my setup is almost identical to my former racing bike, I do not feel like I can get low enough when in a paceline.

My stem is pretty much "slammed" with the exception of a 4mm steel spacer which I assumed was part of the FSA Orbit C-40-ACB headset. I have 10mm of carbon spacers above the stem.
Another solution is to get a new stem with a greater angle drop - for instance if you are running the common 84/6 now, you could go to a 73/17, which would lower the bars. Ritchey sells a 73/17, my recall is others sell 80/10 bars.

How much? For a 100 mm stem, use sin (angle difference) = opposite / hyp. If you are using 6 degree drop now, 17-6 = 11 degrees.
sin (11) = x/100, x = 100 sin (11) = 19.0 mm more drop.
For an 80/10 stem it would give you 7 mm more bars drop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, Z.

I am not trying to make that radical of a change right now. I just want to flip that 4mm spacer from below to above the stem and my main concern that I am writing about is whether the stem can be directly on top of the top bearing cover.
 

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すし + Sweet Potato Kugel
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Eretz, the length of the head tube is 200mm. Most racing bicycles in my size would have head tubes 20mm or more less than that. My mistake for buying a considered "endurance racing", when I am most familiar riding true racing machines.
I missing something. You can also buy a set of bars with a deeper drop. I would do the easiest, take your spacer and put it on top. As some here have said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am mainly focused on the procedure of moving the 4mm spacer from under and putting it on top of the stem with the 10mm carbon spacer so that there will be no spacers between the upper bearing cover and the stem, i.e., I am concerned about carbon steerer tube integrity, etc. Not looking for alternative ways of getting lower, so thank you all anyway.
 

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I am mainly focused on the procedure of moving the 4mm spacer from under and putting it on top of the stem with the 10mm carbon spacer so that there will be no spacers between the upper bearing cover and the stem, i.e., I am concerned about carbon steerer tube integrity, etc. Not looking for alternative ways of getting lower, so thank you all anyway.
It should be fine to remove.
 

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Some carbon forks/steer tubes and are designed so that there shouldn't be spacers on top of the stem so that the compression plug provides support against the clamping force of the stem. I have no idea if that's the case for your fork, but you should check that out - contact Bianchi or someone who can give you expert advice on that, or maybe look at the documents for your bike / fork if they're available.

That said, I don't think there's any difference between the 10 mm you have on there now vs the 14mm you're thinking of having.... unless it changes the ability of the plug to support the tube against the stem clamp.

Other than that, the conical shaped thing on top of the bearings is nothing but a spacer, just shaped to make the transition from the diameter frame's head tube to the diameter of the stem. It's just a spacer, so you can put your stem right on top of it. Like others have said, if it's tall, you can get a shorter one.

If you can figure out how to do it, search for terms such as "slammed stem" there's a whole culture about getting that stem right down on the head tube.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I am thinking that I forgot to ask if I need to move the compression plug if the stem will now be sitting 4mm further down on the carbon steerer tube? My understanding is that the compression plug provides additional integrity when it is centered inside the steerer coincident with where the stem is clamped.

By the way, this is that FSA compression plug on Bianchis that is notorious for a hard rubber/plastic piece, above the expanding assembly, that constantly rattles. While I have the top cap off, I will certainly be trying to immobilize this black plastic piece to stop the rattles, whether or not I have to move the compression plug. I'm thinking for only a 4mm move of where the stem's clamping force is shouldn't require me moving the compression plug.
 
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