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Slow but not so steady
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This past winter I was going to buy an American made frame. I traded emails with a company and made some phone calls. I was going to have close to $1300 in it and it was a stock frame. The $1300 price caused me to look around and I ended up emailing Lynskey and then spoke to them on the phone. I ended up purchasing an '09 for a slight discount. It was a smooth professional transaction. Brief summary after riding it since Spring.

Frame: Size XL Industrial finish. Weight 3.15lbs. Made in the USA.

I have never been a fan of the Ti look until I went to the Handbuilt show in Indy and found that Ti in person is different than Ti in a photo. The quality of frame is top notch. I'm not sure if the photos capture the quality.

Ride: My first and subsequent opinion is that ride is more like a non-compact steel frame but with the bottom bracket stiffness of my aluminum frames. I didn't appreciate the ride until I did a triathlon on chip/seal and blotchy blacktop roads. It handled the roads very well.

Handling: I had concerns with the short chainstays and somewhat short wheelbase but Lynskey runs a 72.5 seattube and 73 headtube. It's not a Crit bike but it is not a Comfort bike. It is a good mix for me. It dives into a curve with stability. It is also great in group rides.

Durability: This was a suprise I never considered with a frame. I lean it up against objects, put it on bike racks and basically treat it like my mountain bike. I have always 'babied' my painted frames but not this one. No more paint jobs. I'll just order new decals when needed.

Fork: I presently run the Alpha Q CS10 with steel steerer. Good fork but pathetic clearance. I did run Mich Pro Race 25 but can't. I went thru some water and then thru some fine gravel and the gravel shredded the clear coat underneath the fork crown. I have also used Ozuo Comp which is a solid fork too.

Verdict: I would buy again.
 

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Bacon!
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Very nice.
 

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nice bike....

thanx for the report. i just ordered an ml size from crc in the uk. mine is the natural finish and as per their email it will also come with the clover drop outs. :thumbsup:
 

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Is it a custom frame sized for you?

I'm thinking of going with a custom steel frame by Chris Kvale. I'll be able to interview with him, go for a ride with him, and then have some measurements taken. Chris is famous for his finely filed thin lugs and super pianting.

His frames are lugged steel but still very light. I'll probably go with the larger diameter thinner tubing. If I go this route the frame will cost me about $2500.00 This is reasonable for a frame in your color choice, your dimensions, and even some artistic flair in the lugs.

Congrats on your fine purchase. Was this a custom frame made to your own body specifications? If I were able to get a made to order TI frame, I would specify a horizontal tope tube, which I feel looks better with thinner tubes. Also I would opt for a thinner fork. Your present fork looks a bit too thick to me in relation to the frame tubes.

Again congrats. There is nothing better than having the ride you want and can enjoy for many years.
 

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Slow but not so steady
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598 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This is a stock frame which has worked well for me. I bought a custom frame back in 2003 and it was a nightmare. The main issue was that I did not get to communicate with the bike maker. I went thru my bike shop and the more people in the communication line screws it up. If you can afford it and you can speak directly with the builder: go for it.

The Lynskey's have a lot of tube manipulations that can't be caught in a photo. The fork looks good in person with the frame because the tubes are quite beefy.

Thanks,
 

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Always like the Ti stock finish

acckids said:
This is a stock frame which has worked well for me. I bought a custom frame back in 2003 and it was a nightmare. The main issue was that I did not get to communicate with the bike maker. I went thru my bike shop and the more people in the communication line screws it up. If you can afford it and you can speak directly with the builder: go for it.

The Lynskey's have a lot of tube manipulations that can't be caught in a photo. The fork looks good in person with the frame because the tubes are quite beefy.

Thanks,
Back in the days of six-day track racing in the US, there was a rider named Cecil Behringer. After his cycling days were over, Mr. Berringer went on to be a universally known metallurgist. One of his early experiences using Ti for bikes was his collaboration with Pino Moroni, a frame builder from Detroit, Mich.

I met Cecil Behringer around 1978 when he was assembling a bike racing track South of Minneapolis. Ironically, there is different kind of a track on that land now...a horse racing track!

http://www.classicrendezvous.com/USA/Behringer/Behringer_cecil.htm
 
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