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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
to all those who've suggested making a tire boot out of an old tire: apparently i don't own the same pair of bolt cutters that you have. my wimpy little wire cutters just won't go through the bead. guess i'll just have to suck it up and eat a power bar...
 

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Dude,, there is a huuuuge difence between bold cutters, and wire cutters...
Besides, I think a dremal with a nice cut off wheel would do wonders for going through the beed....
 

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Cut the bead off

You do not need to cut through the bead wire. Just cut along it for the entire circumference of the tire. A utility knife with a new blade works just fine. This gives you what you need, the tire casing without the bead. Then just the cut casing straight across to make boots in whatever length you desire. I also recommend rounding the corners for easier boot installation. Ideally the boot will cover the inside of the tire you are repairing without overlapping into the bead area. You may have to trim down the width of the boot a bit to accomplish this. Just eyeball it; booting a cut tire is not an exact science. Personally, I size the boots I carry in my repair kit to fit the tires on that bike.

Boots should be made out of the most flexible material possible that will still give the casing of the cut tire the necessary support to contain the inner tube. While you can make workable boots from almost any tire, tires with flexible beads generally have more flexible casing and therefore make better booting material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
galanz said:
Making a tire boot? Where would you put the operating system, and where would the mouse go? ;)

Sorry, overtired computer geek with time to kill...

I haven't worked out the details yet, but I'm thinking I'll run Linux on it. I just got Debian running on another machine, so it would be a good match :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Stogaguy said:
You do not need to cut through the bead wire. Just cut along it for the entire circumference of the tire. A utility knife with a new blade works just fine. This gives you what you need, the tire casing without the bead.
Well, that makes a difference. I've never had a need for one before, just that "what if" part of my brain preparing for disaster. Thanks for the tip!
 

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I use Tyvek not tyres

Strips cut from race numbers last for a long damned time and can be done easily with a pair of scissors. Imho, booting a tire is a short term fix, not reconstructive tire surgery.
 

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Duct tape repairs

I have read about the Tyvek trick but never used it. Sounds like a really good idea. FedEx envelopes are supposed to work great.

On a separate note, I agree that booting is a temporary fix done on the road. However, I have made “permanent” repairs on tires with minor sidewall cuts with duct tape. Seriously, it works great. I clean the inside of the casing with rubbing alcohol let it dry and then apply 3 or 4 layers of duct tape to the inside of the casing. It is best to cut the duct tape to size rather than tear it.

Call me crazy (or cheep) but I have a hard time pitching a brand new expensive tire because of a minor cut. Yes, I agree that this is tempting fate to a certain extent. Therefore, I will never run a duct tape repaired tire on the front.
 

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What happens isn't always what I planned to do.

I don't plan on booting a tire and riding it that way for a long time. I have, however, taken a tire off and found a frayed piece of Tyvek and remembered that I put it in the tire months ago.

Ime, any cut on that is big enough to require a boot is likely, with time, to get bigger, so I don't plan on boots lasting very long. Otoh, they have!
 

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Stogaguy said:
I have read about the Tyvek trick but never used it. Sounds like a really good idea. FedEx envelopes are supposed to work great..

and for good reason

FedEx envelopes, building wrap, painter's suits, medical supply packs, car covers are all uses of Tyvek developed by Du Pont

its cool stuff. Easy to cut but really tough to tear.

I work in the architecture biz and the Tyvek rep gave us some bags made of tyvek. Perfect for putting the shoes in after wearing... (tyvek is a water barrier but not a moisture barrier) so your shoese can dry out but won't get other stuff nasty.

and CD sleaves, how did i forget CD sleaves...
 

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Park stick-on patches work ok. Stick it on the inside of the tire. They're remarkably difficult to remove.

My last new bike came with some wonderously light and thin Vittoria tires... both of which cut up from road debris in less than 1000 miles. They are so thin that I can cut them up with a pair of sissors. I now have a 10 years supply of boots.
 
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