Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know the hubs on Mavic wheels are pretty wide and all but, my problem is I have a set of Easton tubbies that I want to be able to swap out without totally re-adjusting my RD. If I take out some of the spacers from the Mavic hub, the cassette is too loose and I can't shim in the Eastons much as then there's nothing for the ring to grab hold of (the Mavics sit pretty wide and the Eastons are closer to the hub). The spacing is about one gear out, so it's quite a lot. Has anyone had any luck with making something like this work?
 

·
Banned forever.....or not
Joined
·
24,573 Posts
I have a Mavic wheel that I use on my nine speed TT bike that I use for events. I do not have to make any adjustments when I remove my training wheel and put the Mavic on. I use the Mavic supplied spacer and the 9 speed cassette. I've also used the wheel on my ten speed bike (with a 10 speed cassette & 1mm spacer) with the same results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had no problem going from a Shimano hub to the Eastons running 9 speed but, on my 10 speed the Mavics and the Eastons are totally off. I've tried different spacer combos (the Mavic and the Shimano ones) and it none of them work. Either the I can't tighten the ring on, or the cassette is way too loose.
 

·
Banned forever.....or not
Joined
·
24,573 Posts
I have mostly Shimano hubs, but I do have that Mavic Rear, and some no-name made in China hubs that were sold by Performance. They are all spaced equally. No fiddling necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,846 Posts
In order to switch wheels without changing RD trim, you have to match the distance from the cassette to the face of the axle. Since you add the spacer behind the cassette on a Mavic hub it should end up fairly close to any other hub.

If not spot on look for a slightly thicker or thinner cassette spacer for the Mavic, or add a very thin spacer behind your other wheel's cassette.

Note adding spacers between the lockring and cassette doesn't change anything, only spacers behind the cassette or on the axle face, (or behind the right locknut if possible) change the critical frame to 1st sprocket distance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I realize it's a spacer issue but, it's out by well more then a couple of millimeters. It's out by a full gear. I can't get to my 23 and it dumps off the cassette into the frame if I go the other way. I've never seen one that far out before. Just wondering if anyone's seen anything like that before. The lbs guru wasn't in on Sat so I couldn't talk to him about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,846 Posts
wibly wobly said:
I realize it's a spacer issue but, it's out by well more then a couple of millimeters. It's out by a full gear. I can't get to my 23 and it dumps off the cassette into the frame if I go the other way. I've never seen one that far out before. Just wondering if anyone's seen anything like that before. The lbs guru wasn't in on Sat so I couldn't talk to him about it.
Something isn't adding up. Are sure you added a spacer behind the cassette to push it out beyond the edge of the body?.

If the first sprocket (11 or 12t) overhangs the cassette body by 1mm or so which is required for the lockring to compress it properly, than it has to be in about the right place.

The approximate cassette position is determined by the architecture of the hub and can't be changed by more than a tiny amount. Check it by comparing it to another hub or wheel, and measuring the distance from the inside of the frame, or axle face, to the outside of the the cassette body or the first sprocket. It should match within 1mm or so.

If not, either you put the cassette spacer in front of instead of behind the cassette, or you're missing a sprocket or spacer or someone added a spacer to the axle making it extend too far.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top