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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a few of questions on the mavic open pro rims.
i see it is available in 4 versions

silver, black anodized, cd, and ceramic.

are the black, cd, and ceramic heavier than the silver version?
is rim life extended with the anodized, cd, or ceramic versions? (braking surface)
are any stronger than the others?
is dry weather braking any better with any of the versions (not worried about wet weather)
are ceramics worth the extra $$?

tia,
paul
 

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The black anodized rim is a few grams heavier than the silver, but looks nicer. The CD rim is maybe 15-20 grams heavier, but the braking surface will stay coated for years and years (unless you ride thorough a lot of wet sand, all the time).... (some people say that naked aluminum has better stopping power than a CD coat, but I can't tell.)
Ceramic is only good if you ride in the wet very often, and if you have pads for ceramic rims (very abraisive)
 

· "Cypress Gardens" Fl.
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I agree with most of what Mr.Grumpy says, (only because his avatar scares me)

Seriously, I doubt the black anodise is any heavier than the silver, although it could be. The CD or "hard anodising" treatment is heavier, but reportedly increases the rim's strength by about 40%. My old "Open 4" rims were hard anodised and they were virtually scatch proof on up until they died. The surface treatment was very hard and they stayed looking good for a long, long time if you dont mind that almost black, dark grey color.

The ceramic rims offer superior braking in the wet, but will eat up brake pads if you dont use the correct ones. That is my understanding of it.
 

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CD is awsome. . .

croswell1 said:
The CD or "hard anodising" treatment is heavier, but reportedly increases the rim's strength by about 40%. My old "Open 4" rims were hard anodised and they were virtually scatch proof on up until they died.
I've a 5 year old set of Open Pro CD rims, and they are great. The braking surface is still in very good condition, and look good. A very tough rim, that's been beat on for years.:)
 

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Anodizing does not increase strength

croswell1 said:
Seriously, I doubt the black anodise is any heavier than the silver, although it could be. The CD or "hard anodising" treatment is heavier, but reportedly increases the rim's strength by about 40%.
Hard anodizing is an entirely inappropriate surface treatment for aluminum rims. It's negative qualities far outweigh its positives for this application.

Anodization is basically a method to create a layer of aluminum oxide on the surface via electrolysis. Aluminum oxide, being a ceramic, is harder than aluminum, and can add wear resistance to an aluminum surface. In addition, aluminum oxide is relatively inert, and so adds environmental protection against acids, corrosion, etc. However, because the anodize coating is brittle (i.e. it cracks instead of flexing), it imparts no additional strength to the base aluminum. In fact, the oxide layer cracks easily far below the yield point of aluminum.

The anodizing layer can be generated to varying thicknesses. A thin layer of oxide is relatively transparent. Different color coatings can be created by adding a dye to the oxidizing tank. The dye basically gets "trapped" in the oxide coating, coloring the surface of the final product. If a thick oxide layer is created, the dye can not be seen through the oxide, and instead remains the natural color of aluminum oxide (a slightly brownish grey).

As mentioned, the oxide layer is relatively brittle, as compared to aluminum, and cracks easily. If a thicker the the layer of oxide, the deeper the surface cracks will be. The deeper the cracks in the surface are, the more likely they are to propogate through the base metal. Hard anoded rims are therefore less durable than non-anodized rims in terms of fatigue cracks.

Aluminum oxide also has a lower coefficient of friction than bare metal. Hard anodizing on braking surfaces therefore provide less braking force. Typically, braking on hard anodized rims actually improves once the anodize layer on the brake track has been worn through.
 

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I have seen several used sets in my LBS's shop. The black wears off, the cd lasts longer and the ceremic even longer. BUT, the reason I didn't buy them was 3 out of 5 sets had loose grommetts or eyelets or whatever you want to call them. The clicking would seriously get on my nerves.
 

· "Cypress Gardens" Fl.
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Hard Anodising Does Increase Strength.........

Mark McM said:
Hard anodizing is an entirely inappropriate surface treatment for aluminum rims. It's negative qualities far outweigh its positives for this application.QUOTE]



What?....You think I thought this shiot up on my own?? I believe the engineers at Mavic would beg to differ, sir!!.........or for that fact, "FiR" and "Ambrosio" also.

The Mavic "Open 4 CD" rims I had were great. They looked good and stayed looking good for 10,000 miles over many rough roads, all under the heavy weight of my 240 lb. ass for six years.

I dont know about you, but that does'nt sound like a rim that has an entirely innappropriate surface treatment to it. ~ wtf :rolleyes:
 

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Suckered by marketing dept.

croswell1 said:
What?....You think I thought this shiot up on my own?? I believe the engineers at Mavic would beg to differ, sir!!.........or for that fact, "FiR" and "Ambrosio" also.
Hard anodization was first introduced in the early '80s, with all kinds of claims about stronger rims. It was all on how you measured it. In practice, hard anodization largely went the way of the dodo for all the reasons listed by Mark McM. The 40% strength increase was totally bogus in application. The rims failed at a very high rate. That's why you don't see this now, whereas in the mid-80s, many high end rims were hard anodized.
 

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paulieb00 said:
Eric,
could you please elaborate?
i am interested in your thoughts on this.

cheers,
paul
Mark McM is much better at explaining this than me. Basically hard adonizing can cause premature cracking. The Ceramic braking surface is very expensive and only somewhat better in wet conditions. I haven't found normal aluminium braking surfaces to be a problem.

-Eric
 

· "Cypress Gardens" Fl.
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So it was all marketing hype...........

Kerry Irons said:
Hard anodization was first introduced in the early '80s, with all kinds of claims about stronger rims. It was all on how you measured it. In practice, hard anodization largely went the way of the dodo for all the reasons listed by Mark McM. The 40% strength increase was totally bogus in application. The rims failed at a very high rate. That's why you don't see this now, whereas in the mid-80s, many high end rims were hard anodized.

truly tragic to be lied to,...........in the eventuality of it all.
 
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