Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Non non normal
Joined
·
10,102 Posts
If they quit blood letting it will help the stats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,615 Posts
No doubt. We know a guy who went into the hospital with a stroke, and while there, contracted MRSA, pneumonia, and I can't remember what else. :skep:

Taking the afternoon off tomorrow to wait for my sister during her surgery (some sort of lumbar issue, nothing crazy AFAIK.) She's been in the hospital before (benign brain tumor removal) and everything went fine. So I'm optimistic.... mostly!
 

·
Masters Neophyte
Joined
·
2,209 Posts
Scary stuff. I trust my doctors, I think. I always figure "this sort of thing happens to other people, not me".
Ridiculous, I know.
Plus, if you have to go to the ER or something, you have no control over who works on you.

I probably shouldn't have read this thread. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,615 Posts
A certain amount of error is to be expected as doctors hone their skills. Hence the "practice" of medicine.

Essentially, the cost of an experienced surgeon is human sacrifice, when you think about it. (And testing on rats is mostly inaccurate, it turns out.)

On that note, will be heading uptown a bit later as my sister goes for surgery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,713 Posts
A certain amount of error is to be expected as doctors hone their skills. Hence the "practice" of medicine.
That's what the medical establishment would have you believe. But the evidence is overwhelming that a huge percentage of these errors are avoidable by the adoption of better procedures (many of them simple, like checklists), better tracking and evaluation, and more honesty and transparency. These errors that kill and injure people don't all happen in complex surgical settings -- many are stupid and avoidable things like failure to check test results, medication errors, etc. The numbers in this study, while shocking, aren't really new. Multiple studies over the last 25 years have shown the same results: 200,000 to 400,000 avoidable deaths per year in the U.S.

Good luck to your sister. My wife is having cancer surgery the day after tomorrow. I think we have a very good surgical team.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,709 Posts
Good luck to your sister. My wife is having cancer surgery the day after tomorrow. I think we have a very good surgical team.
Good luck to you and your wife. Mine had a lumpectomy almost two years ago. It was a scary time for us, but everything turned out OK. Lesson learned: if it's serious, we go to Johns Hopkins.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,615 Posts
That's what the medical establishment would have you believe. But the evidence is overwhelming that a huge percentage of these errors are avoidable by the adoption of better procedures (many of them simple, like checklists)

Good luck to you and everybody else dealing with hospitals!

You are right, I'm sure doctors would like to put a more noble spin on "oops." It also helps to use a Sharpie and indicate, for example, "THIS LEG!" :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,415 Posts
All I know is my mother was sent to the hospital in serious condition from her nursing home, died shortly thereafter of a treatable injury, and her death certificate was a complete fabrication.

My father's doctors examined him regularly in the years following oral cancer surgery and treatment for nasal polyps but missed the large tumor growing in his nasal cavity.
 

·
gazing from the shadows
Joined
·
27,290 Posts
The links were a bit skimpy on details. And that is reason enough to dig deeper.

Not much time today, but for a taste of a pretty long take on this research claim:

https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.or...-third-most-common-cause-of-death-in-the-u-s/

I’ll conclude by giving my answer to the question that all of these studies ask, starting with the IOM report: How many deaths in the US are due to medical errors? The answer is: I don’t know! And neither do Makary and Daniels—or anyone else for sure. I do know that there might be a couple of hundred thousand possibly preventable deaths in hospitals, but that number might be much lower or higher depending on how you define “preventable.” I’m also pretty sure that medical errors, in and of themselves, are not the number three cause of deaths. That’s because medical errors rarely occur in isolation from serious medical conditions, which means it’s very to attribute most deaths to primarily a medical error. That number of 250,000 almost certainly includes a lot of deaths that were not primarily due to medical error, given that that’s 9% of all deaths every year.

But it’s even more than that. As I mentioned above, According to the CDC, of the 2.6 million deaths that occur every year in the U.S., 715,000 occur in hospitals, which means that, if Makary’s estimates are correct, 35% of all hospital deaths are due to medical errors. On its face, such a claim is very hard to believe, especially if you consider that, of those who died in a hospital, 75% were age 65 and over, and 27% were age 85 and over. That’s a lot of people prone to dying because they are old and ill, regardless of how good their care was. Add to that the fact that between 2000 and 2010, hospital deaths decreased 8% even though the number of hospitalizations increased 11%, and Makary’s numbers become less and less credible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
953 Posts
My wife is having cancer surgery the day after tomorrow. I think we have a very good surgical team.[/QUOTE]

I know what you are going through, and I wish you the best of luck. My wife had a complete hysterectomy with robotic surgery about a year and half ago. The next day she took the train home. I begged her to take a cab, but she insisted.
 

·
Doesn't like subtitles
Joined
·
3,808 Posts
I think the headline, but really the title of the study are somewhat sensationalistic. I think it is very difficult to argue that all of the deaths are caused by medical error. A more accurate term would more likely be "deaths in which a medical error occurred". the water in this river of data is very muddy.

Part of the argument of the study is that medical error is not an option on death certificates and this data would be more accurate if it were. Cause of death as listed on a death certificate is often a guessing game, based on a "most likely" scenario.
 

·
disgruntled pigskin fan
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
Meh, more living people just leads to more global warming. Fewer people mean fewer ills in the world. [\sarcasm off]
I will not dispute the fact that the world is overpopulated and this accelerates climate change and reduces overall quality of life. But your comment may be a bit insensitive in light of the stories others have shared here. Surely part of the solution is better birth control and education among the countries with lesser healthcare infrastructure, not apathy/indifference (sarcasm or not) toward those who've died unnecessarily.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,615 Posts
I will not dispute the fact that the world is overpopulated and this accelerates climate change and reduces overall quality of life. But your comment may be a bit insensitive in light of the stories others have shared here. Surely part of the solution is better birth control and education among the countries with lesser healthcare infrastructure, not apathy/indifference (sarcasm or not) toward those who've died unnecessarily.
It was sarcasm as posted here, but sadly, a lot of agencies (such as those who work for the DOT, for example) actually think along those lines. "Why put a stoplight there? Only two people have died so far. When another three are killed, get back to us."

Guess the medical community is similar in some ways.

In any case, my sister survived her surgery, but the really hard part will be the recovery (they took a dremel to part of her spinal canal to make it wider.)
 

·
Master debator.
Joined
·
8,777 Posts
I went through an extended period of heath issues related to my heart a few years back. The best thing you can do is research and educate yourself as best you can on what you have and the various treatment options etc. I think anyone that's ever stayed in a hospital bed has learned that the doctors don't really seem interested in talking to you, you have to pry the information out of them when they happen to pop their head in to visit you for a minute.

I have sat in a doctors office for a visit many times and heard them say "with the internet everyone self-diagnoses and thinks they are a doctor these days". But the internet is also a wealth of information, and it can help you know what to ask to help yourself. If you have a doctor that doesn't seem interested in involving you in your own treatment, drop them and find another one.

On a side note. I really hate that drug companies can advertise on television and radio. Think of how many people do think they have the symptoms the drug is claiming to cure, and actually can go in and get that drug because their doctor is more than willing to push the scrips nowadays. I've been offered depression meds by my doctor during a routine physical, I almost felt they were being pushed on me. It's out of control.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top