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All I can say about sizing is get a pro fit, pay a shop... and get a perfect fit. If you end up spending $60 to get a decent fit to a mid-level tri-bike like the Aero TT then its a good deal.
You need to remember that tri-bikes are fitted to people so that they are ready for the run after the 60+ mile ride.So the muscles in your legs are relaxed and ready for the run. Take a look at Youtube on Tri-bike fitting... and watch at least 6 different GOOD sizing videos.

So how you feel on your road bike is VERY!!!!!! different on how you would feel on a tri-bike.
 

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I used the fit calculator at CompetitiveCyclist.com with really good results. Note that they have a special tribike fit calculator thats different from their standard calculator. It spits out your optimal tube lengths after you input 8 or so different body dimensions.

Based on my saga of trying to fit myself, which involved that online tool as well as conversations with several longtime cyclists, posts to this forum (see my Windsor Knight thread), and waaayyy too much obsessive agonizing, i offer the following: get the 56.

Thats what i did after also feeling like i too needed the non-existent 57 (i'm just under 6'0" with about 32.5" inseam), and my choice has been validated by both my (totally enjoyable) riding experience and the LBS guy i paid to do my fitting after my Knight arrived. For tri racing you definitely want to err on the smaller side (for example, competitive cyclist said my body could range down to a 55 for a tri bike), but even for a standard road bike my understanding is that it's easier to tune a slightly undersized frame to work well than trying to do so for a slightly oversized one. Given our similarity in body size, your potentially shorter torso, and the fact that you'll be in an aero crouch most of the time, 56 seems to me to be pretty clearly the way you want to go.

keep in mind my advice is nothing but a couple pennies worth from an amateur on a web forum, but you asked for it and i'm being sincere. as they say YMMV.

now, to address the fact that several posters will follow up saying "go to your LBS to get sized for your first bike" thats probably true if money is not an issue, but the reality for me (and i imagine you given the Aero TT choice) is that i just couldnt afford to work through a LBS to get the bike i wanted. I was looking at hundreds more for a bike that matched the specs of my Knight. Heck, it was hundreds more for bikes with lower grade component sets. Furthermore, at my pricepoint, i came to trust my own judgment with respect to sizing more than the LBS guys, because in a few instances i left with the distinct impression that they viewed me as someone to shoehorn into some older stock rather than a customer to help get dialed in with the right gear. I concluded that, based on the information i had gathered for myself, there was as much a gamble in going that route as there was ordering a BD bike. I am really glad I went with the latter option, because i freakin' love my bike and how it fits and saved a ton of dough.

Maybe someday (doubtful) cash won't be an issue and i'll be able to go buy some hotrod from the LBS that entitles me to deluxe full service, but until then i'm pretty damn satisfied with the DIY approach and BD.

Good luck.
 

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Well my comments about the LBS were just added as a way to pay $60 to get your type of bike with the measurements you need and parts you can live with. I will always buy from Bikes direct, if the employee pricing at the shop is not going to give me a good deal, and since I understand bike fit now, my options are open to any bike I like Online or not.
 
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